Henry Morton Stanley

African explorer, 1841-1904

The Welsh journalist and explorer was famous for his exploration of central Africa and his search for missionary and explorer David Livingstone. Upon finding Livingstone, Stanley reportedly asked, „Dr. Livingstone, I presume?“ Stanley is also known for his search for the source of the Nile, his work in and development of the Congo Basin region in association with King Leopold II of the Belgians and for commanding the Emin Pasha Relief Expedition which tarnished his name because of the conduct of the other Europeans: British gentlemen and army officers, who behaved with extreme cruelty and even offered an 11-year-old girl to cannibals.

Source: Wikipedia

Stanley, Henry Morton

Afrikareisender (1841–1904). Autograph letter signed („HenryMStanley“). Wohl London. 1 S. auf Doppelblatt. 8vo.
$ 2,127 / 1.800 € (23120)

To Felix Stone Moscheles (1833–1917), son of composer and conductor Ignaz Moscheles, accepting his invitation to lunch on Sunday: „It will give me great pleasure to lunch with you next Sunday [...] Mrs Stanley will not be able to come as her mother is not strong + she must take her place with the friends who generally call on Sunday afternoon. 1.30 P.M. I observe is the hour at which time I hope to be with you [...]”. – On stationary with embossed address.

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Stanley, Henry Morton

African explorer (1841-1904). Autograph letter signed. [London]. 8vo. 1½ pp. on double leaf. With autogr. envelope.
$ 1,773 / 1.500 € (33374/BN28467)

J. C. Andrews, responding to an invitation to visit America: "In reply to your kind letter just to hand, I have to state that as I have not yet made any arrangements to visit America, it is not possible for me, at present, to engage myself [...]". - On stationery with embossed letterhead; letter good, envelope worn.

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Stanley, Henry Morton

African explorer (1841-1904). Autograph letter signed. Pirbright, Surrey. 8vo. 3 pp. on 3 ff.
$ 10,044 / 8.500 € (44405/BN30941)

A sharp letter revealing Stanley's sensitivity to cultures other than his own and his desire to impart this on others. To Robert Stein, criticizing his correspondent's remarks about the French, Germans, Americans and the English: "It is impossible to read your article without coming to the conclusion that you are an accomplished writer, & I feel immensely flattered at being asked to endorse what has been so ably & eloquently argued. I am sorry however to say that my rude common sense prevents me from approving your suggestion.

I am neither pro-German, or pro-French and I distinctly see that the ideas you broach will not please Frenchmen nor indeed any American or Englishman who is of clean unbiassed mind, & I doubt, whether the higher class of Germans will regard them as wise. I cannot divest my mind quite from the suspicion that there is some irony concealed in your proposals, & if I were a Frenchman I feel I should be furiously angry. You may be innocent of all intention to provoke Frenchmen, but it is too evident your exaggerated ideas of German[y] might border perilously near being offensive. If America talked of American projects with such exaggerated insinuation of her power, & her wealth &c, she would be simply insufferable, & no lover of Germany would care to put ideas in her mouth which would estrange the good will of every nation. Germany is too rich & powerful to need such language to impress her greatness & her value as one of the foremost among the nations. As yet she feels the need of more land, but if out of inordinate conceit she proclaims her greedy love of it & wantonly promotes discord to indulge it, she will end in making herself as detested as the French did previous to 1870-71 [...]". - On his imprinted stationery; very scattered spotting..

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