Arnold Sommerfeld

German physicist, 1868-1951

Sommerfeld was a German theoretical physicist who pioneered developments in atomic and quantum physics, and also educated and mentored a large number of students for the new era of theoretical physics. He served as PhD supervisor for more Nobel prize winners in physics than any other supervisor to date. He introduced the 2nd quantum number (azimuthal quantum number) and the 4th quantum number (spin quantum number). He also introduced the fine-structure constant and pioneered X-ray wave theory. He was nominated for the Nobel Prize 84 times, more than any other physicist (including Otto Stern, who got nominated 82 times), but he never received the award.

Source: Wikipedia

Sommerfeld, Arnold

Physiker (1868-1951). Autograph letter signed ("A. Sommerfeld"). Aachen. 1 S. auf Doppelblatt. Gr.-8vo.
$ 2,851 / 2.500 € (49484/BN33887)

To the unnamed Austrian physicist Stefan Meyer (1872-1949), a student of Ludwig Boltzmann who became a pioneer in research on radioactivity. Sommerfeld is sending a manuscript for a commemorative publication for Ludwig Boltzmann.

buy now

sold

 
Sommerfeld, Arnold

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Arnold Sommerfeld (1868-1951), Physiker. E. Brief m. U., München, 14. Februar 1921, zwei Seiten 8°. Gelocht [dadurch minimaler Buchstabenverlust]; kleine Klammerspur. An den Physiker Rudolf Ladenburg in Berlin über die Quantentheorie: „[…] Es ist mir sehr recht, wenn Sie Ihre Notiz im Jahrbuch veröffentlichen. Ich habe daraufhin an der betr. Stelle mein M[anu]s[kript]. etwas gekürzt. Ich habe mir erlaubt, in Ihr[e]m M[anu]s[kript] zwei Stellen anzuzweifeln. Die Berufung auf die ‚Grenzbedingung’ scheint mir nicht am Platz. Der Grund, weshalb das Spektrum kontinuirlich wird, ist vorher von Ihnen genau bezeichnet. Aber das Correspondenzprincip findet streng genommen nur Anwendung, wenn [es folgen einigen Formeln zur Quantentheorie] also z.B. beim Übergange von n von 101 zu 100. Hier aber findet ein unendlich großer Quantensprung statt. Sodann ist mir Ihre Auffassung des kontin[uierlich] erzwungenen Röntgenspektrums problematisch […] Ihr Mechanismus ist mir zu gekünstelt. Auch scheint mir die Intensitäts- u. Härteverteilung des ‚Bremsspektrums’ so nicht zu folgen. Ich trage gerade im Colleg über die Anwendung des Correspondenzsp. auf das ‚Br.-Sp.’ vor ohne zu wissen, ob ich durchkommen werde […]“ – Sommerfeld erweiterte 1916 das Bohrsche Atommodell, so dass es auch für höhere Atome galt und wandte als Erster die spezielle Relativitätstheorie auf die Quantentheorie an.


Sommerfeld, Arnold

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Arnold Sommerfeld (1868-1951), theoretical physicist. ALS. Munich, 14 February 1921. 2 pp. 8°. With punched holes (insignificant loss to letters) and slight traces of stapling. In German, to the Berlin physicist Rudolf Ladenburg, regarding Quantum Theory: "[...] I would be most happy if your were to publish your note in the Yearbook. In view of this, I have compressed in my ms. the relevant section. I took the liberty of questioning two passages in your ms. The invocation of the 'limiting condition' seems out of place to me. You have already precisely stated the reason why the spectrum becomes continuous. But, strictly speaking, the principle of correspondence applies only when [here follow several quantum-theoretical formulae], for example, when n changes over from 101 to 100. This, however, is an instance of an infinitely large quantum jump. Furthermore, I find your conception of a continually forced Roentgen spectrum problematic [...] Your mechanism appears too contrived. Also, the distribution of intensity and hardness in the 'deceleration spectrum' would to me not seem to follow thus. I am just giving a lecture on the application of the correspondence principle to the 'deceleration spectrum' without knowing whether I am going to make it [...]". – In 1916, Sommerfeld generalized Bohr's model of the atom to make it apply to higher atoms. He became one of the founders of quantum mechanics and was the first to apply the Special Theory of Relativity to Quantum Theory.