George Bernard Shaw

Shaw, George Bernard

Schriftsteller (1856–1950). Portraitphotographie mit eigenh. U. („G. Bernard Shaw“). O. O. u. D. 258:158 mm.
$ 592 / 500 € (13102)

George Bernard Shaw (1856–1950), Schriftsteller. Originalphotographie mit e. U. („G. Bernard Shaw“). O. O. u. D. 258:158 mm. – Leicht unscharfes Altersportrait mit Stock. – Mit kleinem, alt montiertem ms. Schildchen am linken oberen Rand: „Miss RADIE HARRIS“ und e. Ergänzung: „Signed on the black visible slantwise in red“. – Die Journalistin und Kolumnistin Radie Harries (1904–2001), eine der bekanntesten Bühnenreporterinnen ihrer Zeit, war seit den 1940er Jahren mehrere Jahrzehnte lang für den „Hollywood Reporter“ tätig und hatte auch zeitweilig eine Radiosendung bei CBS.

buy now

Shaw, George Bernard

Schriftsteller (1856–1950). Questionnaire with autograph answers. O. O. 2¼ SS. Gr.-4to.
$ 10,057 / 8.500 € (26187)

Shaw is answering four questions concerning the political situation in Europa after WW II; the questions had been sent by James E. Brown from the International News Service: „[...] I would be very grateful if you could spare a few minutes of your time to answer four questions. The recent foreign affairs’ debate in the House of Commons revealed a striking degree of agreement on general policy between the Conservatives and Socialists. Since the government will, therefore, presumably act along these lines, your answers to the following non-hypothetical questions would be of great interest to the world: 1.) Do you approve of Mr.

Bevin’s proposals for a western European union? [Shaw: ] I do not see what else Mr. Bevin can do under the circumstances than play for what union he can get in Europe or elsewhere out of politically uneducated electorates and pseudo-statesmen who do not know what their shibboleths mean. Meanwhile he must borrow what he can from the U. S. A. in view of the general European bilking that followed 1918, and the frequent prodigious bilk that is politely called devaluation of the franc. Poincaré over again! – 2.) Do you believe some measure of material prosperity in western Europe will halt the spread of Communism? [Shaw:] No. I believe that the spread of Communism will enormously increase the material prosperity of the world if civilization be not wrecked by childish rulers playing with atomic bombs and the like. Even the atomic may be superseded by the discovery of a poison gas lighter than air, which will kill men without destroying their works. That would civilize us if anything can. – 3.) Do you agree with Mr. Churchill that the western powers ‘should bring matters to a head’ with the Soviet Union before the Russians perfect the atom bomb? [Shaw:] That depends on what the head is. A thick head may mean war. A clear head may save the situation, for a while at least. The clearest head available at present is Stalin’s; but no man is more dangerously misunderstood both here and in the U. S. S. R. where his official supremacy is in fact as precarious that we in the west should give him all the support and countenance in our power. Stalin is a Communist in principle; but so was Trotsky, who declared him to be a vulgar ugly upstart poisoner, and would have had him shot had he supplanted him in the Politbureau. The issue between them was between Fabian tactics, a British invention (called H. F. P. in Russia) and instantaneous catastrophic universal economic revolution throughout the world: a flat impossibility. It is for us to back Stalin as an arch Fabian against the world, including Russia. – 4.) Do you feel the ‘straight speaking’ to Russia now in vogue in Britain and the U. S. A. will prevent war between the East and West by forcing Soviet Russia to delay or halt her world expansion policy? [Shaw:] There has been no straight speaking except from Stalin, who stands for Socialism In A Single Country as against Imperialist expansion. He knows that Soviet Russia cannot afford another war, and has to beware of warmongers in Russia as well (or ill) as in America and the British Commonwealth. He has to deal with Churchillian Tory Democracy, alias Fascism or the annexation of Fabianism for the benefit of the private owners of the natural sources of production, and Labour Party chiefs like ours, who are actually to the Right of Mr Churchill with their senseless denunciations of Communism as such, and of Totalitarianism, which is Anarchism; for a law that is not totalitarian is no law. The real mischief is the silly notion that constitutional policy can be totalitarian. All civilisation begins and endures with Communism. Nobody proposes to decommunise our streets, bridges, water, police, courts of justice and the rest, nor to abolish Cobdenist free trade utterly. Without Communism we should starve. Without Cobdenism we should stagnate. Without Fascism betwixt and between the transition to Socialism would not work. There is no such animal as a totalitarian Socialist, Individualist, Democrat, Tory, or Whig: there are only human beings, described by Carlyle as mostly fools. But I must bid you gooday, as I doubt whether you understand a word I am saying [...]“..

buy now

Shaw, George Bernard

Schriftsteller (1856-1950). Autograph postcard signed on the reverse. Ayot Saint Lawrence. 1 S. 8vo.
$ 1,893 / 1.600 € (4059)

To Henry Charles Duffin, the author of his biography „The Quintessence of Bernard Shaw“: „Dear Duffin | Have a look at the current | Times Literary Supplement. | Quintessences have now | become soft soap. | G. Bernard Shaw […]”. The postcard shows an impressive portrait of Shaw in his nineties. Accompanied by I. Duffin, H. CH., The Quintessence of Bernard Shaw. London (1920). – First edition. – With autograph quotation to his wife Dorothy, who is also the addressee of the printed dedication on p.

5: „To ‚the most delightful woman I ever met’ H.“. With an autograph note by Dorothy: „June 19 1920“. II. „CORRESPONDENCE between George Bernard Shaw and Henry Charles Duffin“. Typed copy with some autograph corrections by G. B. Shaw. Ca. 1949. – Copy of letters written during 24 December 1919 and 5 July 1922 concerning the printing proofs of the “Quintessence”. – With a carbon copy of the same manuscript..

buy now

Shaw, George Bernard

Irish playwright and critic known for his plays Saint Joan and Pygmalion (1856-1950). Autograph Manuscript unsigned. [London, December 4, 1929.]. 4to. ½ p.
$ 4,141 / 3.500 € (78292)

[To Henry Losti Russell.] Shaw’s autograph response to a typed question inquiring: “In your opinion, if the forthcoming Five-Power Disarmament Conference terminates in an agreement, will this alter materially the attitude of the people toward war or contribute in any concrete way to the cause of peace? If, on the other hand, the Conference fails, do you think that this fact is likely to increase the possibility of future wars, harm the cause of peace generally or embitter the relations between nations? Why, or why not?” “No.

The thing will be called a Disarmament Conference; but it will really be an Armament Conference playing Beggar my Neighbor. Since Russia called our pacifist bluff at Geneva by offering to disarm in earnest if the others would, and they all instantly refused to speak to her, even when Mr. Kellogg promptly called it again and was humbugged by the Self Defence reservation, our Pacifists are only crying Peace where there is no peace. Signor Mussolini, who openly promises glory to the Italians without remonstrance, is franker and less alarming.” Shaw began his writing career on April 21, 1894, when his play Arms and the Man, which explores the futility of war, opened to great acclaim in London. His foremost international success, it represented “the true beginning of [his] recognition as a popular dramatist,” (Encyclopedia Britannica). Likened by some to Shakespeare, Shaw combined satire, comedy and social criticism in his more than 50 plays. His famous stage works include Saint Joan (for which he was awarded the Nobel Prize in literature in 1925), Man and Superman and Pygmalion, the inspiration for the popular musical My Fair Lady. World War I prompted Shaw to abandon the creation of socially critical drama, and instead write criticism about the horrors of the period. During the war Shaw published a controversial pamphlet, Common Sense about the War, suggesting that both Great Britain and the Allies were as responsible as the Germans committing atrocities, and argued for negotiation and peace. He also gave numerous anti-war speeches that provoked much domestic criticism. In 1928, Shaw authored The Intelligent Woman’s Guide to Socialism, Capitalism, Sovietism and Fascism, and by the 1930s he had self-identified as a communist. Shaw’s strong opinions on the Treaty of Versailles signed at the end of World War I and his published comments on these matters likely led to the frequent soliciting of his opinion. In 1922, the United States, Japan, France, and Italy signed the Five Powers Treaty at the Washington Conference, which limited future naval growth. President Calvin Coolidge invited the signatories to revisit the subject in 1927, however, France and Italy declined, leaving Japan, Great Britain and the United States to meet at the Geneva Naval Conference and discuss naval limitations. However, the parties failed to reach an agreement, which led to a third meeting, the London Naval Conference of 1930, at which time Great Britain, the United States, Japan, France, and Italy attempted to discuss disarmament and revise the terms of the Five Power Treaty of 1922. Penned more than seven months after the effective date of the Kellogg-Briand Pact, co-named for American Secretary of State Frank Billings Kellogg (1856-1937), which called for peaceful settlement of future disputes between its original signatories, France, the United States and Germany, and later the United Kingdom, Soviet Union and other countries who agreed to adhere to its principles. Our manuscript, in which Shaw mentions Italian Prime Minister Benito Mussolini (1883-1945) by name, illustrates the playwright’s unabashed cynicism regarding international affairs, but also his misguided support for Mussolini and other dictators like Lenin, Stalin and Hitler. Beggar-my-Neighbour is a British card game which is sometimes used to describe the mutually destructive nature of protectionist policies. Folded and in very fine condition..

buy now

Shaw, George Bernard

Irish playwright and critic known for his plays Saint Joan and Pygmalion (1856-1950). Autograph Manuscript unsigned. [London, December 4, 1929.]. 4to. ½ p.
$ 2,958 / 2.500 € (78293)

[To Henry Losti Russell.] Shaw’s autograph response to a typed question inquiring: “IDo you believe that the prevention of future wars is likely to be made any surer by Anglo American cooperation and friendship? Why or why not?” “Unter existing cirumstances it might just as easily produce a war as prevent it. The co-operation of Germany, Austria & Turkey produced the co-opeation of Britain, France and Russia; and the two co-operations produced a war. A combination of the United States, the British Empire, France and Germany would make war very risky for the rest of the world if these Powers were really resolved not to tolerate it, especially if they ceased plotting to destroy Russia.

But there is no evidence that they have any such resolution, or that they trust one another’s pacifist professions.” Shaw began his writing career on April 21, 1894, when his play Arms and the Man, which explores the futility of war, opened to great acclaim in London. His foremost international success, it represented “the true beginning of [his] recognition as a popular dramatist,” (Encyclopedia Britannica). Likened by some to Shakespeare, Shaw combined satire, comedy and social criticism in his more than 50 plays. His famous stage works include Saint Joan (for which he was awarded the Nobel Prize in literature in 1925), Man and Superman and Pygmalion, the inspiration for the popular musical My Fair Lady. World War I prompted Shaw to abandon the creation of socially critical drama, and instead write criticism about the horrors of the period. During the war Shaw published a controversial pamphlet, Common Sense about the War, suggesting that both Great Britain and the Allies were as responsible as the Germans committing atrocities, and argued for negotiation and peace. He also gave numerous anti-war speeches that provoked much domestic criticism. In 1928, Shaw authored The Intelligent Woman’s Guide to Socialism, Capitalism, Sovietism and Fascism, and by the 1930s he had self-identified as a communist. Shaw’s strong opinions on the Treaty of Versailles signed at the end of World War I and his published comments on these matters likely led to the frequent soliciting of his opinion. In 1922, the United States, Japan, France, and Italy signed the Five Powers Treaty at the Washington Conference, which limited future naval growth. President Calvin Coolidge invited the signatories to revisit the subject in 1927, however, France and Italy declined, leaving Japan, Great Britain and the United States to meet at the Geneva Naval Conference and discuss naval limitations. However, the parties failed to reach an agreement, which led to a third meeting, the London Naval Conference of 1930, at which time Great Britain, the United States, Japan, France, and Italy attempted to discuss disarmament and revise the terms of the Five Power Treaty of 1922. Penned more than seven months after the effective date of the Kellogg-Briand Pact, co-named for American Secretary of State Frank Billings Kellogg (1856-1937), which called for peaceful settlement of future disputes between its original signatories, France, the United States and Germany, and later the United Kingdom, Soviet Union and other countries who agreed to adhere to its principles. Our manuscript, in which Shaw mentions Italian Prime Minister Benito Mussolini (1883-1945) by name, illustrates the playwright’s unabashed cynicism regarding international affairs, but also his misguided support for Mussolini and other dictators like Lenin, Stalin and Hitler. Beggar-my-Neighbour is a British card game which is sometimes used to describe the mutually destructive nature of protectionist policies. Folded and in very fine condition..

buy now

Shaw, George Bernard

Schriftsteller (1856-1950). Autograph postcard signed ("Bernard Shaw"). London. 1 S. 8vo. Mit eh. Adresse.
$ 1,420 / 1.200 € (33414/BN28522)

To the French director and actor Aurélian Lugné-Poe (1869-1940) in Paris: "Mlle Newcombe me dit que vous allez jouer 'Peer Gynt'. Cela vaut bien un voyage à Paris. Voulez-vous avoir la bonté de me dire sur quelle soirée la reppresentation [!] aura lieu. Je n'en sais rien à présent; et Mlle Newcombe ne peut m'èclairer [...]". - Together with the poet and critic C. Mauclair, Lugne-Poe founded the Theatre de I’Oeuvre in Paris in 1893 and was its head until 1929; already in the first year he had given a piece of Ibsen, namely "Rosmersholm". - Slightly browned due to paper; one pinhead-sized hole on the upper margin.

buy now

Shaw, George Bernard

Anglo-Irish writer (1856-1950). 1 autograph letter signed and 2 autogr. lettercards signed (in full, or initials). London. (Small) 8vo. Altogether (1½+1+1 =) 3½ pp. on 4 ff.
$ 2,958 / 2.500 € (47156/BN31818)

To John Henderson, Secretary of the National Liberal Club. I: "[...] Would next Saturday be too sudden? I can think of nothing better, although I have two lectures to give on Saturday, + would rather appreciate an evening's rest beforehand. Still, as you say your room is a small one, I could take matters quietly in an address on 'Politics, Tory, Liberal + Working Class' [...]" (October 8, 1890). - II: "I have just been reminded that the Chrystal Palace concerto begins next Saturday. This will make it very inconvenient for me to go to Harlesden [...]" (October 9, 1890).

- III: "No: if I were to add ... chairtaking to my platform activities, it would finish me altogether. Besides, it is very bad economy for the Circle to waste a star speaker on the chair. It is hard enough to get him one; and when you do, you had better got the whole evening out of him [...]" (December 20, 1922). - Accompaned by a typed letter signed by Shaw's secretary, Blanche Patch..

buy now

Shaw, George Bernard

Anglo-Irish writer (1856-1950). Typed letter signed ("G. Bernard Shaw"). Apparently Adelphi Terrace (London). 4to. ¾ page.
$ 1,420 / 1.200 € (79031/BN50632)

To the writer Charles McEvoy: "You cant take me in: they have chucked you out of the clerkship because you cannot even be induced to date your letters. On my return from Ireland this morning I found this one waiting for me; and I havnt the least idea when it was written. The only thing to be done with a man like you is to give him a commission, thereby raising his pay and relieving him from any obligation to work. I always thought your father would be one of the best cards in your hand pending your achievement of a commanding literary position [...]". - With printed address and some larger stains.

buy now

Shaw, George Bernard

Anglo-Irish writer (1856-1950). Typed letter. Apparently Ayot Saint Lawrence. Oblong 8vo. 2 pages.
$ 592 / 500 € (79032/BN50633)

To the writer Charles McEvoy: "What a chap you are! You should have been an operatic tenor, always wanting people to attend to you. Here I am, after slaving myself to death to get my big book through, suddenly forced to stop to produce that wretched play at the Strand Theatre, and then, when I was starting to work overtime to make up for it, knocked out for a month by this infernal pyrexia they call influenza. And all the time you are moaning because, after touching me for - how much was it to get you out of all your difficulties? you immediately demanded £80 more to save you from ruin.

And when I throw your letters with oaths into the fire (half a dozen others having been busy cleaning out my loose cash just then) you conclude that my sensitive soul is wounded by your proposal to put it into a play, and modulate your moans accordingly. The reason your play is no use is that people dont [!] go to the theatre to hear that sort of thing. If they want Shaw (which is not invariably the case) they go to headquarters for it, and not to Bath. But that secondhand literary stuff is no use anyhow, no matter how you disguise it. Write a play about a superior young lady, who will not allow anyone to play jazz in her presence, or anything commoner than Bach, and who is revolted by the vulgarity of the cinema: in short, a first rate snob who thinks she is a ten foot highbrow. She meets and loves and is loved by a mistery man who is enormously rich, and loads with her presents, and sympathizes with her fastidiousness. Where, you will say, is the drama here? Very obviously the enormously rich connoisseur is Charlie Chaplin, unrecognizable without the moustache and bowler hat and baggy trousers, though he has a strange sense of having been haunted by his eyes. You can make another The Likes of Er out of that: at least I could. I canT [!] write any more: it puts up my temperature. G. B. S." - With printed address..

buy now

sold

 
Shaw, George Bernard

Autograph letter signed ("G. Bernard Shaw").
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

To Archibald Henderson, one of Shaw's chief U. S. advocates and biographer. Shaw notes that he encloses (not present) "what I have been able to do at odd moments and on rainy days to fill up that book for Harper. I can do more, and ought not to have done this, as it involved postponement of more important work for which I was too lazy. As to the agreement [...] the thing you sent me is absurd: Harper thinks he can escape his legal responsibilities by making a private agreement with someone to indemnify him, a proceeding which exposes him to prosecution [...] all he can exact from an author is an assurance that the book does not contain any hidden libel. For all overt libel, sedition, blasphemy or obscenity the publisher and printer are liable [...] Harper probably thinks that he could murder me and have you hanged for it if he could produce an agreement to that effect [...]". He thanks Henderson for some notes on "the New York Joan", and asks after Mrs. Henderson, mentioning his hopes that this reaches him at Skyland (North Carolina). - In 1925, Harper & Bros. published "Table Talk of G. B. S. Conversations on Things in general Between ... and his Biographer", by Archibald Henderson (1877-1963), professor of Mathematics at the University of North Carolina. - On Highland Hotel stationery.