Johann Georg [Grasel

[Grasel, Johann Georg

Räuberhauptmann (1790-1818)]. "Chronologischer Ausweis uiber die von dem am 19. November 1815 im Wirtshause zu Martersdorf bei Horn gefänglich eingezogenen berüchtigten Räuber Johann Georg Grasel verübten [...] 202 Verbrechen". Wien. 07.12.1816. Deutsche Handschrift auf Papier. 14 SS. auf 8 Bll. Folio. Geheftet.
$ 2,119 / 2.000 € (32085/BN22695)

Detailed table of the places, times, and circumstances of the 202 crimes committed by the notorious bandit Johann Georg Grasel, who terrorized Lower Austria's Waldviertel region in the early 19th century. An archival copy for the records prepared by Georg Vinzenz Höllinger, staff auditor with the Lower Austrian General Military Command. - Grasel committed 194 of his crimes "while still a civilian", while "the last 8 thefts were committed in the character of a soldier". The vast majority of his crimes, the first of which was committed in Raabs an der Thaya on 17 March 1806, were thefts, but the list also includes a few robberies and manslaughters.

The last entry is dated 10 November 1815: a theft perpetrated in Echsenbach. - Increasingly taking to drink, Grasel was finally captured through a plot in which he was drugged with opium. The principal reason for the death sentence which was finally carried out on 31 January 1818 was the crime listed here as No. 148: "Robbery with manslaughter or respectively with murder", perpetrated in Zwettl on 18 May 1814. - Old record registration "1815-13-81". In excellent state of preservation..

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[Grasel, Johann Georg

Räuberhauptmann (1790-1818)]. "Verzeichnis all derjenigen mittel und unmittelbaren Theilnehmer an den Verbrechen des Raubmörders Georg Grasel". Kriminalgericht Drosendorf. 24.10.1815. Titel und 10 SS. auf 6 Bll. Folio. Geheftet.
$ 1,589 / 1.500 € (32086/BN22696)

A table naming and describing all the 61 accomplices of the legendary bandit Johann Georg Grasl who terrorized Lower Austria's Waldviertel region in the early 19th century, prepared by the criminal court official Schopf shortly before the fugitive's arrest on 19 November 1815. The list notes the real names (if known) and nicknames, along with brief but often colourful signalment. Accomplices thus described include not only a significant portion of Grasel's own family, but also Theresia "Resel" Hamberger, "the mistress of the robber chief Grassl, a very brazen person", and her uncle Johann: "23 years old, of short stature, short brown hair, like eyebrows, no beard, small face, pointy chin, longish nose, pockmarked face, speaks German, a very rakish fellow who has taken part in many of Grassl's crimes".

A girl known as "Dog's Soup" (real name unknown) is described as a "young hussy with a scarred face who supports herself by begging"; a similarly nameless carriage driver from Weitersfeld is indicted for having given Grassl lodging; Isaac Stern, a "Jew from Bernschlag", is accused of having "knowingly bought stolen goods", while a tailor from Stalleck "is accused of fraud". - Grasel, who began his career with petty thieveries and ended with robbery and murder, increasingly took to drink and was finally captured through a plot in which he was drugged with opium at an inn. He was publicly hanged in Vienna on 31 January 1818, his last words supposedly being, "Jesus, what a crowd!". - A fascinating police signalment of Lower Austria's poverty-ridden criminal underworld in the early 19th century..

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