Guglielmo Marconi

Italian pioneer of long distance radio transmission, 1874-1937

Guglielmo Marconi was an Italian inventor and electrical engineer, known for his pioneering work on long-distance radio transmission and for his development of Marconi's law and a radio telegraph system. He is often credited as the inventor of radio, and he shared the 1909 Nobel Prize in Physics with Karl Ferdinand Braun „in recognition of their contributions to the development of wireless telegraphy“. An entrepreneur, businessman, and founder in Britain in 1897 of The Wireless Telegraph & Signal Company (which became the Marconi Company), Marconi succeeded in making a commercial success of radio by innovating and building on the work of previous experimenters and physicists.

Source: Wikipedia

Marconi, Guglielmo

italienischer Radiopionier, Unternehmer und Nobelpreisträger (1874-1937). Eigenh. Billet m. U. o. O. 32mo. 1 p.
$ 455 / 400 € (60121)

„To Professor. Siegfried Burghauer | very sincerely | Gulielmo Marconi“. - Bereits in jungen Jahren interessierte ihn besonders die Elektrizität. Neuere Untersuchungenzeigen, dass er sich mit der Verbesserung der Leistungsfähigkeit von Batterien beschäftigt hat. Als er die Schriften von Heinrich Hertz studierte, wandte sich Marconi der drahtlosen Telegrafie zu und gilt zusammen mit Nikola Tesla als Pionier der drahtlosen Kommunikation. 1895 begann er auf dem Landgut seines Vaters, der Villa Griffone bei Bologna, mit Laborexperimenten.

Im Sommer 1895 stellte er auch einige seiner ersten Versuche über 2,5 km Entfernung in Salvan in den Schweizer Alpen an. 1896 baute Marconi ein „Gerät zur Aufspürung und Registrierung elektrischer Schwingungen“ von Alexander Stepanowitsch Popow nach und ließ dieses im Juni 1896 vor Popow patentieren. Später verlegte er sein Labor auf die Kreideklippen der Isle of Wight, ließ sein System in Großbritannien patentieren (britisches Patent Nr. 12039) und gründete 1897 das Unternehmen Marconi's Wireless Telegraph Company Ltd. mit Sitz in London. Am 27. März 1899[3] kam es zur ersten drahtlosen Verbindung über den Ärmelkanal vom South Foreland Lighthouse (Leuchtturm von South Foreland) bei Dover nach Wimereux. Am 12. Dezember 1901 gelang der erste transatlantische Funkempfang eines Signals (Buchstabe S des Morsecode) aus Poldhu auf der Halbinsel The Lizard in Cornwall auf dem Signal Hill bei St. John's in Neufundland. Im folgenden Jahr konnte Marconi Testnachrichten in beiden Richtungen über den Atlantischen Ozean übertragen und gründete die American Marconi Wireless Corporation mit Sitz in New York. Am 18. Januar 1903 gelang die erste öffentliche transatlantische Kommunikation: Marconi tauschte von der Marconi Wireless Station in Cape Cod, Massachusetts, Grußbotschaften zwischen US-Präsident Theodore Roosevelt und dem König von England Eduard VII. aus. Das System wurde von der Kriegsmarine übernommen. Auch von der südwestirischen Mizen-Halbinsel kommunizierte Marconi mit dem vorbeifahrenden Schiffsverkehr auf dem Atlantik. Am 26. Juni 1905 erhielt Island das erste Telegramm seiner Geschichte, noch bevor ein Seekabel verlegt wurde. Seit 1907 bestand ab dem westirischen Ort Derrygimla bei Clifden ein drahtloser transatlantischer Telegrafendienst für die Öffentlichkeit. Die Sendestation wurde während des Irischen Bürgerkrieges 1922 zerstört. Im Jahr 1909 erhielt Marconi gemeinsam mit Ferdinand Braun den Physiknobelpreis. Später beschäftigte er sich mit der Anwendung von Kurz- und Mikrowellen. Es gelang ihm, in den Anfangstagen der drahtlosen Nachrichtentechnik zur See fast ein Weltmonopol zu errichten. Gegenspieler in der Technik waren vor allem deutsche Entwicklungen durch Ferdinand Braun (Siemens, Telefunken) und Adolf Slaby (AEG). Zusammen mit Papst Pius XI. und Giuseppe Gianfranceschi SJ gehörte er zu den Schöpfern von Radio Vatikan, das am 21. September 1930 seinen Betrieb aufnahm. Wikipedia..

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Marconi, Guglielmo

Italian inventor, father of long distance radio transmission (1874-1937). The papers of Richard Norman Vyvyan, Marconi's Chief Engineer, comprising over 30 letters by Guglielmo Marconi, letters by other correspondents including Sir Ambrose Fleming, and Vyvyan's journal recording their trial operations. Mostly London and New York, but including Mullion, Cornwall, Newport, R.I., etc. 8 ALS (6 March 1902-1 July 1905, 4to and 8vo, 41 pp.) and 23 TLS (29 Aug. 1907-10 June 1909, 4to, 36 pp., plus one fragment of a letter signed) by Marconi. 1 ALS by Marconi's wife Beatrice (n. p. o. d., "Friday", 6 pp.). Also includes Vyvyan's illustrated.
$ 90,968 / 80.000 € (34049/BN29763)

A major archive relating to the early years of transatlantic telegraphy. The engineer Richard N. Vyvyan was to a large measure responsible for both the construction and operation of the transmitting station at Poldhu in Cornwall, from where the first ever transatlantic signal was sent to Newfoundland on 12 December 1901, and in charge of the station at Cape Breton the following year when the first signal was sent the other way and a regular service established. His 1933 book "Wireless over 30 Years" remains an important source for the history of wireless.

- Marconi's autograph letters, written at the time of the first transmission of telegraph signal from Canada to England, are almost all to Vyvyan, but one it to the engineer's wife, informing her that he has been "working very hard to try and find out what are the somewhat occult causes which make signals good one night and unobtainable the next, and also the reason of the great difference in distance over which signals can be sent by day compared to night. For this purpose I have had to carry out a very great number of tests between [Poldhu] and other stations on the east coast and in Scotland, and I believe I have found if not very clearly the cause of the effects noticed at least the means by which to obtain signals across the Atlantic by day as well as by night" (5 Aug. 1903). On 15 May 1904, in a "Private" letter of eight 4to pages, he provides Vyvyan with "a statement of the results obtained from the working of the Poldhu station during the last voyage of the S. S Campania, from Liverpool to New York [...] I have undertaken to carry out a series of tests to war ships stationed at different points, the receiving apparatus being taken in charge of by our assistants. I shall try various sending arrangements at Poldhu [...]". Other letters cover more domestic matters, such as Marconi's marriage ("It seems rather strange that I should have got married - doesn't it? but I am so glad that I have and we are very happy..."), their respective children (Marconi standing as godfather to the Vyvyan's daughter Mildred), and their life together in a shared house at Cape Breton. - Marconi's typed letters to Vyvyan constitute a more formal series, written in Marconi's capacity as Managing Director to Vyvyan at Glace Bay, discussing personnel and equipment: "Since my return here from London a few days ago I have been carrying out some interesting work. We are at present using only about half the available power of the plant, and the results of the programme, according to latest reports, are satisfactory in the light of the arrangements which we are using at this end. I hope that, by the time this letter reaches Glace Bay, you will have received the discs which were sent in charge of the operator of the 'Empress of Ireland' last Friday" (29 Aug. 1907). - Of especial interest are Vyvyan's illustrated autograph "Notes on Long Distance Wireless Telegraphy", beginning in 1900 with their work on the first transatlantic transmission ("In March of 1900 Mr Marconi after his invention of transmitting jigger decided that wireless telegraphy across the Atlantic was possible") and running on up to February 1904. A continuation volume is lacking. - The remaining correspondence archive comprises 9 letters by Sir Ambrose Fleming, co-worker with Vyvyan for Marconi and inventor of the thermionic valve ("I read of the death of Marconi in a four-days-old London Times newspaper when having tea at Vadheim in Norway [...] The obituaries which I have seen since return to England of him in the newspapers and magazines do not do justice to the cooperative work of his colleagues or of his contemporaries and I think it may be necessary to repair this omission [...] I agree with all you say about M. He had genius of a certain kind but he over-reached himself in thinking that he could appropriate the whole credit for wireless", 1901-1937), a letter by Vyvyan to his brother ("Baby has had the distinction of being the first who has ever had its birth announced by wireless telegraphy"), and a series to him by Godfrey C. Isaacs ("I would point out to you that this letter is marked 'Confidential' and therefore the handing of a copy of the letter to you must be treated as equally confidential") and by Alldin Moore ("how the dickens is [...] anyone at the Admiralty to deal with your Company except through you [...] you were & are the man one could say anything to without the fear of it being brought up in evidence later"). Several news clippings ("Television impossible [...] Official view of B.B.C.") and contemporary photographs of the transmitting station top off this fine collection that provides a vivid image of the nascent stages of a revolutionary invention..

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Marconi, Guglielmo

E. Albumblatt mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Guglielmo Marconi (1874–1937), Physiker und Elektroingenieur. E. Albumblatt mit U. Rom, 25. März 1932. 1 S. Carte de Visite-Format. – „Good luck!“ – Auf Briefpapier mit gepr. Vignette „Senato del Regno“.


Marconi, Guglielmo

Portraitphotographie m. e. U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Guglielmo Marconi (1874-1937), Italian physicist, inventor of Wireless Telegraphy. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1909. SP 3.5 x 5.75 inch, G. Marconi, n. p. n. d. The photograph shows Marconi in a head and shoulders pose, looking slightly away from the camera. Signed in black fountain pen ink. The photograph is under a passepartout and is framed. In fine condition.


Marconi, Guglielmo

Portraitphotographie m. e. U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Guglielmo Marconi (1874–1937), physicist and Nobel laureate. Portrait photograph with dedication signed, Santa Margherita Ligure, 2 September 1936, large 4to. Half-length portrait in semi-profile facing right.


Marconi, Guglielmo

Portraitphotographie mit eigenh. Unterschrift.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Signed and dated at lower edge. - From the studio of Bruner, Trento; right margin slightly cut off.