Charles Kean

Kean, Charles

englischer Schauspieler (1811-1868). Letter signed. O. O. 1 S. 8vo.
$ 0 / 200 € (939155/BN939155)

"Mr. Kean regrets extremely that it is not in his power to accede to Mr. Grosskopf's request as the nature of Mr. Kean's engagement at Drury Lane theatre does not grant him the privilege of placing a name on the free list of that establishment […]".

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Kean, Charles

British actor (1811-1868). Autograph letter signed. Keydell House, Horndean (Hampshire). 8vo. 2 pp. on bifolium.
$ 0 / 250 € (77442/BN49878)

To Mrs. Horner, probably Anne Susanna Horner (1786-1862), wife of educational reformer Leonard Horner (1785-1864), in response to an invitation: "It will, I assure you, give Mrs. Kean and myself great pleasure to wait upon you at Dinner next Monday 26th. We hope to reach no. 3 Torrington Square tomorrow evening and had intended to return home next Saturday but as we cannot resist your kind invitation we shall delay our stay in Town until Tuesday morning 27th. - We must steam to Guernsey on Saturday 31st [...]".

- The letter was written shortly before the successful American tour undertaken by Kean and his wife, the actress Ellen Kean (1805-80), for the theatrical seasons of 1845/46 and 1846/47. The possible identification of the recipient with Anne Susanna Horner would be consistent with the provenance of the letter from the autograph collection of Baron Leonard Lyell, Horner's grandson. Letters provide evidence that Anne Susanna Horner's eldest daughter Lady Mary Lyell was acquainted with Charles Kean and his wife. - With traces of former mounting..

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Kean, Charles

British actor (1811-1868). Autograph letter signed. London. 8vo. 2 pp. on single leaf. With portrait photograph of Charles Kean (67 x 104 mm).
$ 0 / 250 € (77443/BN49879)

An invitation to a theatre performance to conchologist and geologist Lady Mary Horner Lyell (1808-73), wife of famous geologist Sir Charles Lyell (1797-1875): "I had the pleasure of meeting Sir Charles the other day, who informed me that you were in Town, and moreover that you had visited our little Theater and had been so much gratified with the Comedy of Twelth Night. As you have seen my wife in Viola, I shall be really jealous if you do not pay the same compliment to Hamlet and therefore venture to hope you will avail yourself the admission to a Private Booth for Monday 28th [...]".

- A charming testimony to the friendship between Charles Kean, his wife and stage partner Ellen (1805-80) and the Lyell family. In 1849 Charles Kean and his wife had acquired the "Princess's Theatre" in Oxford Street, where they successfully performed in historicizing Shakespeare productions for ten years. - With slight traces of former mounting..

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Kean, Charles

British actor (1811-1868). Autograph letter signed. [New Orleans. 8vo. 1 p. on bifolium. With autograph address "C. Lyell Esq. No 18".
$ 0 / 250 € (77444/BN49880)

Letter of excuse to the important geologist Sir Charles Lyell (1797-1875): "I am in bed! Mrs. Kean's maid has just found your kind note in our sitting room. - I am unfortunately under the influence of blue pill and we act Macbeth to night, which always obliges us to keep very quiet. - otherweise we should have the greatest pleasure in accompanying you in your drive [?]. Pray let us see you before you leave N. Orleans. [...]". - On 1 March 1846 Charles Kean and his wife and co-star Ellen Kean (1805-80) arrived in New Orleans as part of their two-year tour of the U.S.

A first performance of "Macbeth" was given on 4 March and repeated on the 6th. On 21 March 1846 the engagement in New Orleans ended and the Keans continued their tour in Mobile, Alabama (cf. Richard Denman Strahan, The American Theatrical Tours of Charles Kean, PhD diss., University of Florida, Gainesville 1984, pp. 90-93). This timeframe overlaps with Charles Lyell's documented visit to New Orleans from 24 February to 10 March 1846 (cf. Hubert Skinner, "Charles Lyell in Louisana", pp. 243-245, in: Tulane Studies in Geology and Paleontology 4.12 [1976]). - The "blue pill" refers to a common mercury-based medicine, also called "blue mass" that was believed to alleviate various kinds of ailments. It was most famously used by Abraham Lincoln to treat his "melancholic disposition". - Traces of former mounting..

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