Ernest Hemingway

American author and journalist, 1899-1961

Hemingway had a strong influence on 20th-century fiction, while his life of adventure and his public image influenced later generations. Hemingway produced most of his work between the mid-1920s and the mid-1950s, and won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1954. He published seven novels, six short story collections, and two non-fiction works. Additional works, including three novels, four short story collections, and three non-fiction works, were published posthumously. Many of his works are considered classics of American literature.

Source: Wikipedia

Hemingway, Ernest

American novelist, Nobel laureate (1899-1961). Exceptional group of four letters from Hemingway to his close friend Guy Hickok. France, Spain, the Bahamas, Cuba, and aboard the S.S. Volendam of the Holland-America Line. 4to and 8vo. 18 pages.
$ 54,581 / 48.000 € (47476)

Exceptional group of four letters from Hemingway to his close friend Guy Hickok, comprising one ALS, two partial autograph letters, and a one-page TLS. The longest ALS, signed “Ernest,” nine pages on five sheets, May 7, [1931], was written aboard the S.S. Volendam of the Holland-America Line. In part: “When my kidney was being weird had to give up drinking for about 6 weeks but now can drink and have drunk for ever since a year ago last February—I may have made a certain amt. of dough which has all been give away, loaned or spent but I am a son of a bitch if I have become respectable and no later than last winter was forced to sleep all night on the front porch—not being a good size for Pauline to carry up stairs—and on going to church the next morning was supposed to be healed…just because I had bumped into the holy water fount, that I saw the car was standing with the top down and the 3/4 empty bottle very visible (it had been invisible in the dark) in front of the church with the French nameplate to identify it! Don’t want to claim to be a drunk like you but have not become respectable Gros—The reason I didn't write you about the book is because it is hard enough to write it without writing about it.

But listen if you will come down to Madrid you can read it typed…besides which we could see who can drink and who not and see the bullfights—The dope is this…will go to Madrid and work like a bastard on this book until finished—Have 280 some pages done—most to be written over and 1/3 or more to be added—I think you’ll like the damn book.” He goes on to discuss his travel plans and the repayment of a loan, before discussing an arm injury suffered in Montana: “I couldn't write then because my arm was still paralyzed. Have only been able to write since 3 weeks. It will be absolutely all right if keep after it. Anyway can shoot, fish and write with it now, but can't sock anybody.” Here, he sketches a diagram of his arm’s range of motion. Hemingway also provides a sketch of his new home in Key West, pointing out his favorite features, including a “flat roof, see all over town and sea.” The second, a partial autograph letter in pencil, unsigned, one page both sides, June 18, [1935], in part: “Listen stupid when you get in a money jam why in hell don’t let me know?…God dammit I was always suspicious of that Syndicate job…Gingrich of Esquire is coming here July 3-6 to fish and I will talk to him about your staff.” The third, a partial autograph letter in pencil, signed “Ernest” and “E. Hemingway [within his address],” one page, no date, in part: “Address here is E. Hemingway, c/o Captain George D. Kreidt, 1437 S.W. 5th Street, Miami, he brings mail on pilot boat once a week. Just got Mary’s letter last night. Don’t be afraid to cash this check as have 438 in bank by latest statement. Also 1000 coming in on July 1.” The fourth, a TLS signed in pencil, “Hemingstein,” one page, no date, in part: “It was swell to hear from you and thanks the hell of a lot for sending me the 100 bucks. I appreciate it like hell and know how damned hard it is to get money together in chunks as big as that. It came in damned handy because have been writing on this novel since last March First and during that time make no dough. Had seventy four bucks in my bank account when got your hundred.” At the conclusion, Hemingway jots down his Cuban address: “Address, Hotel Ambos Mundos, Havana—Cuba.” Also includes three letters in another hand (apparently dictated by Hemingway) as well as one unsigned typed letter, frequently referencing loans between the two. In overall very good to fine condition, with tears to the bottom of the typed letter. A young Ernest Hemingway first met the recipient of these letters, Guy Hickok (addressed here as “Gros”) in the early 1920s when they were both acting as foreign correspondents for North American newspapers in Paris. Hemingway, working for the Toronto Star, began what would become an enduring friendship with the good-natured Hickok, who was on assignment for the Brooklyn Daily Eagle. Hickok even provided the inspiration for Hemingway's short story ‘Che Ti Dice La Patria?’ (collected in Men Without Women, 1927). This fabulous correspondence is congenial, unrestrained, and mildly profane, and lends tremendous insight into Hemingway’s life and work..

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Hemingway, Ernest

American writer and Nobel Laureate (1899-1961). Autograph envelope signed. Malaga. 12mo. 1 page.
$ 1,706 / 1.500 € (59839)

Envelope addressed to „Monique Lange de chez Gallimard“ with his signature and address on the verso of the envelop „E. Hemingway Apartado 67 Malaga Espagne“.

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Hemingway, Ernest

American novelist, Nobel laureate (1899-1961). Collection of 4 (1 autograph and 3 typed) letters, all signed ("Ernie"). San Francisco de Paula (Cuba) and apparently Madrid. Large 4to. Altogether 4¼ pp. on 5 pp. With one autogr. envelope.
$ 62,541 / 55.000 € (44185/BN30219)

To George Brown, the owner of a gymnasium in Manhattan, Hemingway's personal trainer, boxing coach, and friend. - I: Hemingway's affection for his sporting pal is evident in this revealing and highly personal letter, written shortly before Ernest and Mary left for an African safari: "How are you kid? Mary sends her best. We are fine and in very good shape and think of you often. Were out on a trip together on the boat for two weeks and we go to bed every night after it gets dark and have plenty of time to talk and to sleep good [...]".

Hemingway then gives news of his sons and mentions his youngest son ("Gig"), who, in his early twenties, was turning violently hostile to his father: "I am sorry I spoke against Gig since he is a friend of yours and used to be of mine as well as my favorite son. But he changed very strange very fast. As bad as though the devil was managing him. I couldn't ever see him again; not even to go and see him hanged. But if he seems good to you, O.K. I haven't heard from him since last November when he came of age [...]" (Finca Vigia, San Francisco de Paula, Cuba, 12 May 1953). - II: Written on the eve of the latter's visit to Cuba and while preparations are being made for the filming of "The Old Man And The Sea": "George you can't have any confidence in any of those characters. They are all tighter than a hogs ass in fly time. That Goldwyn kid was nice as could be when it was a question of seeing us and thus becoming an old pal of old Ernie […]" (ibid., 18 August 1955). - III: Written from his sickbed. Preparations were still being made for the film, and Hemingway had spent September trying to get actions shots of leaping marlins for the producer Leland Hayward. Apparently, too, Hemingway was making an effort to get Brown involved in getting Spencer Tracy in shape, for he writes: "I am very sorry about [Peter] Viertel [who wrote the screenplay] behaving so carelessly. He is a very selfish boy but I think he has a little bit of an excuse in that he was with Zinneman on the script and was expecting you out there. While Zinneman was down here we discussed the whole thing about your getting Spencer in shape and agreed it was absolutely necessary and we spoke about it again on the long distance phone […]" (ibid., 25 November 1955; with several autograph lines in pencil). - IV: In early 1954 Ernest and Mary Hemingway suffered two near-fatal plane crashes in Uganda, and Hemingway's injuries were extensive (according to Carlos Baker, "The crash at Butiaba and the fire at Shimoni had [...] left him no more than a shadow of his former vigor"). "Just got your letter of Jan 14 George forwarded back from Nairobi. Sure glad you liked the first hooks piece with the pictures. We'd only been out 4-5 weeks then and I wasn't really in shape. In 5 months of that stuff got down to under 190 before those crashes. Now no exercise since Jan 23-24th except early necessary damaging exercise (pitching rocks left-handed with a busted back type of exercise). Good thing I was in shape though. All doctors look at you like some kind of freak like Joe Grimm because you are alive. Am tired of being so smashed up. But always remember you and your head. We beat this one I guess but the smashed vertebrae etc is a no good rap […]" ([Madrid], 24 May 1954). - I to III: On personal stationery of Finca Vigia; IV: on sheet of hotel stationery ("Palace Hotel, Madrid"). - Partly light-soiled, otherwise in fine condition..

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Hemingway, Ernest

American novelist, Nobel laureate (1899-1961). Autograph letter signed ("Ernie"). [Madrid]. 8vo. 2 pp. on bifolium.
$ 9,665 / 8.500 € (61047/BN45074)

To George Brown, the owner of a gymnasium in Manhattan, Hemingway's personal trainer, boxing coach, and friend. In early 1954 Ernest and Mary Hemingway suffered two near-fatal plane crashes in Uganda, and Hemingway's injuries were extensive. According to Carlos Baker, "The crash at Butiaba and the fire at Shimoni had [...] left him no more than a shadow of his former vigor […]". - "Just got your letter of Jan 14 George forwarded back from Nairobi. Sure glad you liked the first hooks piece with the pictures.

We'd only been out 4-5 weeks then and I wasn't really in shape. In 5 months of that stuff got down to under 190 before those crashes. Now no exercise since Jan 23-24th except early necessary damaging exercise (pitching rocks left-handed with a busted back type of exercise). Good thing I was in shape though. All doctors look at you like some kind of freak like Joe Grimm because you are alive. Am tired of being so smashed up. But always remember you and your head. We beat this one I guess but the smashed vertebrae etc is a no good rap […]" ([Madrid], May 24, 1954)..

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Hemingway, Ernest

Eigenh. Albumblatt mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Ernest Hemingway (1899–1961), Schriftsteller und Nobelpreisträger. E. Albumblatt mit Widmung und U. O. O. u. D. 1 S. 4to. "To Richard Ehm | with all good wishes" – Mit alt montiertem Portrait (Zeitungsausschnitt).