Sigmund Freud

Austrian neurologist, 1856-1939

Sigmund Freud is known as the father of psychoanalysis. In creating psychoanalysis, a clinical method for treating psychopathology through dialogue between a patient and a psychoanalyst,[7] Freud developed therapeutic techniques such as the use of free association and discovered transference, establishing its central role in the analytic process. His work has suffused contemporary Western thought and popular culture. In January 1933, the Nazis took control of Germany, and Freud's books were prominent among those they burned and destroyed. He died in his London exile on 23 September 1939.

Source: Wikipedia

Freud, Sigmund

physician, founder of psychoanalysis, (1856-1939). Autograph Letter Signed ("Freud"). Berchtesgaden. 8vo. 1 page. On personal letterhead.
$ 24,321 / 22.000 € (47415)

Letter to Dr. Dorian Feigenbaum, in full (translated): “I will be very pleased writing for you a preamble to your forthcoming publication.  This introduction shall contain nothing more than remarks regarding the way this is studied in America and also a confirmation that the source for competent and pertinent information shall come from you and your team. I shall write this in German and it will be up to you making arrangements for translation.” In fine condition, with a paperclip impression to top edge. Upon meeting Otto Gross, the counterculture icon and maverick disciple of Freud, in the army during the First World War, Dorian Feigenbaum went on to be analyzed by and train under the controversial psychoanalyst.

After six years working as a psychiatrist in Switzerland, he moved to Palestine, where he served as a psychiatric adviser to the government; from there he traveled to America and joined the New York Psychoanalytic Society. Despite Freud’s falling out with Feigenbaum’s mentor, he gladly accepted the doctor’s request to write an introduction for a special issue of The Medical Review of Reviews. When it was published in 1930, it appeared with Freud’s invigorating words, ending, ‘It is to be hoped that works of the kind that Dr. Feigenbaum intends to publish in his Review will be a powerful encouragement to the interest in psycho-analysis in America.’ An rare handwritten letter from field’s founding father, helping promote international interest in his colleagues’—and his own—work..

buy now

Freud, Sigmund

physician, founder of psychoanalysis, (1856-1939). Autograph letter signed „Freud“. On the verso an ALS (1 page) by his wife Martha Freud to the same recipient. n.p. 8vo. 1 page.
$ 27,638 / 25.000 € (59809)

A significant unpublished one-page autograph letter signed by Sigmund Freud, October 14th 1926. Freud comforts a woman who, it appears, is suffering from cancer; Freud himself had been suffering since 1923 from cancer of the jaw. He opens, “Dear woman, Please do not interpret my long silence as a lack of empathy on my part! I can absolutely identify with everything such an event engenders, I just find it very difficult to put my feelings into words, particularly as one who is no longer enjoying life in its fullness, and as one who certainly doesn’t count himself entirely among the living.” He goes on, “You perhaps are unable to fathom the degree to which this condition changes a person’s general outlook in regard to everything in this world.

I am not trying to console you, and do not wish to disturb your legitimate grief, I only offer my heartfelt regards as your kin. Yours devotedly, Freud.” To the reverse is the last page of a letter from Freud’s wife, Martha, to the same recipient – the first page of Martha’s letter was undoubtedly written on an integral leaf that is no longer present. Martha Freud writes, in part, “I would love to learn, dear Hanna, how you are doing now, whether it is possible for you to work professionally, and whether you are still living by yourself in that large house… I have not visited Hamburg in exactly two years, but in our hearts we are close and enjoy our deep friendship despite the great distance between us. For today I remain with best wishes and a heartfelt embrace. Your loyal, Martha Freud.” In very fine condition. Freud wrote widely on the subject of death. Ahead of his death drive theory, set out in Beyond the Pleasure Principle (1920), Freud wrote in 1915, “It is indeed impossible to imagine our own death; and whenever we attempt to do so we can perceive that we are in fact still present as spectators. … At bottom no one believes in his own death … In the unconscious every one of us is convinced of his own immortality.” In the context of Freud’s own writings on the subject, one might then presume that Freud chooses his words carefully when describing himself as “(not) entirely among the living”. A moving insight into Freud’s thoughts on his own mortality that is unknown to scholars..

buy now

Freud, Sigmund

physician, founder of psychoanalysis, (1856-1939). Autograph letter signed „Freud“. Wien, Bergasse 19. Gr.-4to. 1 1/2 pp. (287 x 228mm) (minor marginal soiling and wear, tape repairs to folds in blank portion of verso, touching one letter). On his printed letterhead.
$ 71,858 / 65.000 € (59941)

Freud writes to a South African psychoanalyst Dr. Wulf Sachs with a commendation for a series of lectures the latter intends to publish, describing them as ‘an instructive and valuable introduction into the science of psychoanalysis, which is so hard to depict’ (eine lehrreiche und wertvolle Einführung in die so schwer darstellbare Wissenschaft der Psychoanalyse), noting that this recommendation is available for publicity purposes. On Sachs’s reports of difficulties, Freud is not at all surprised – ‘Why should it be different in South Africa from elsewhere?’.

He goes on to make a number of specific comments on the manuscript, particularly in regard to Sachs’s presentation of the anal stage (‘Daß ich den Analcharakter vor der Libidoentwickl[un]g beschreibe, ist nicht richtig’), and to the presentation of the Oedipus complex, noting that whilst childhood passions are as a general rule openly voiced, oedipal emotions tend to be unconscious only after their renewal during puberty (‘Ubw [i.e. Unbewusst] sind die Oedip.-Regungen zumeist bei ihrer Erneuerung in der Pubertätszeit’), adding a further note about the development of consciousness with a warning against drawing conclusions from brain anatomy, and concluding with warm wishes on the endeavours of Sachs and his colleagues.

The pioneer of psychoanalysis in South Africa, Wulf Sachs began his training in 1929. His key work is Black Hamlet (1937), a ground-breaking psychoanalytical biography of a black Zimbabwean traditional healer named John Chavafambira (The Freud Encyclopedia (2002), p.13)..

buy now

Freud, Sigmund

Begründer der Psychoanalyse (1856-1939). Eigenh. Briefkarte mit Unterschrift. Wien. 8vo. 1 p.
$ 8,291 / 7.500 € (60669)

„Nehmen Sie den Ausdruck wahrer innigen Teilnahme an Ihrem unersetzlichen Verlust entgegen - im Namen aller Meinigen [...]“. - Wohl an den Wiener Mediziner Josef von Halban. Dessen Frau, die bedeutende Sopranistin Selma Kurz-Halban, war am 10.5.1933 verstorben. Ihr von Fritz Wotruba auf dem Wiener Zentralfriedhof gestaltetes Grabdenkmal, eine „Grosse Liegende“, sollte 1934 eine heftige Kontroverse auslösen, da es neben dem Grab des Theologen und christlich-konservativen Bundeskanzlers Ignaz Seipel stand.

buy now

Freud, Sigmund

physician, founder of psychoanalysis, (1856-1939). Typed Letter Signed, "freud". Vienna. 1 page. 8vo. On „Prof. Dr. Freud“ stationery.
$ 8,291 / 7.500 € (61403)

To an unnamed recipient, "Esteemed Sir," in German, explaining that his work at the "magic mountain" leaves only the evenings to socialize and arranging a meeting after dinner. „I am very sorry that your recent visit to me was unsuccessful. My day in this magic mountain or cave is divided in such a way that I have only the evening for enjoyments. May I suggest that you honor me with a visit today, at 8 or 8:15 after dinner, to exchange ideas and have a cigar? Or give the bearer some other time?“ - Thomas Mann's novel, Magic Mountain, in which several themes are developed including the health of the mind and body, was published in 1924, two years prior to the writing of this letter.

buy now

Freud, Sigmund

physician, founder of psychoanalysis, (1856-1939). His personal visiting card. London. 32mo. 1 p.
$ 2,764 / 2.500 € (61448)

Freud’s personal visiting card with his first address in London. Freud was living at this address only for three months. - Visitenkarte mit Freuds erster Adresse in London. Freud wohnte nach seiner Emigration nur drei Monate in der Elsworthy Road, da der Mietvertrag nicht verlängert werden konnte. Beilage: Blatt mit Adresse: 20 Maresfield Gardens, London NW 3 mit Stempel: "Per pro Sigmund Freud". Hier handelt es sich um Freuds zweite Adresse in London. Das Haus, das von der Familie bis zum Tod von Anna Freud 1982 bewohnt wurde, ist heute Sitz des Freud Museums London.

buy now

Freud, Sigmund

physician, founder of psychoanalysis, (1856-1939). 2 Autograph letters signed. Vienna. 8vo. 2 1/2 pages. Prof. Dr. Freud letterhead, with the envelopes. Folded. A 1cm tear on the lower margin of the 2nd letter very slightly affecting the first letter of the final word, not affecting the reading. .
$ 24,321 / 22.000 € (61539)

Very moving and intimate letters from Sigmund Freud to his sick former student Elis Révész a few days before her death and a condolences letter to her husband, Hungarian psychoanalyst Sandor Radó. Elie Révész was a Freud's student in the 1910s. Once she became psychoanalyst (of the so called "First generation"), she analysed Sandor Radó who she then married. 
When she got sick, Freud was informed by his friend and colleague Sandor Ferenczy and then send her a comforting letter: "I am writing to you with my sincere wishes for your speed and complete recovery (...) I am assuming your care is in the most experienced hands.

Ferenczi, I am certain, will be keeping me informed". She died a couple of days after the letter arrived. Freud then sent a moving letter to the widower, single father, and prominent Hungarian psychoanalyst Sandor Rado: "I am totally devastated over that outcome (...) Please do accept the expressions of my most sincere sympathy. (...) while a student of mine, your wife had been particularly dear to me (...) I was always impressed by her conduct, her quick grasp of any situation (...) Who is taking care of your little daughter? That sweet darling at her tender age being robbed of her mother's protection left to cope in this cruel world." Sandor Radó decided to move to the United States shortly after the death of his wife, where he took part of creation of the psychoanalytic department of Columbia University. .

buy now

Freud, Sigmund

Begründer der Psychoanalyse (1856-1939). Eigenhändiger Brief mit Unterschrift „Ihr Freud“. Wien. Berggasse 19. 8vo. 2/3 p. Gedr. Briefpapier.
$ 26,532 / 24.000 € (72537)

Großer Brief an den „lieben verehrten Freund“, seinen Wiener Kollegen, den österreichisch-britischer Historiker und Universitätsprofessor Alfred Francis Přibram (1859-1942): „Dank für Ihr Lebenszeichen. Es entschädigt mich dafür, daß Sie Wien verlassen haben, ohne persönlich Abschied von mir zu nehmen (Ihren Brief habe ich erhalten). Es schmerzt mich sehr daß Sie leiden. Ich kann nicht hinzusetzen noch immer an Ihren Vorschlag zur Correktur der ,Weltordnung’ man sollte den Glauben an eine Wiedervereinigung nach dem Tode haben misfällt mir etwas.

[…] Vor einigen Monaten hätte ich das Bedürfnis gespürt ein öffentliches Unglaubensbekenntnis abzulegen. Warum eigentlich? Ich weiß es nicht. Die Frucht dieser Lesung war ein Büchlein die Zukunft einer Illusion das ich Ihnen vom Verlag schiken lasse. Nicht grade zum Trost, dazu ist es nicht angethan sondern weil ich freundschaftlich liebe und schätze. Ich gebe eben was ich habe. Ich halte noch ziemlich zusammen u. hoffe daß mein Mut und mein Trotz mich nicht vor meinem Ende verlassen werden. Was Sie von meinem Buch in Amerika schreiben läßt mich natürlich sehr kühl aber nicht darum weil ich gegen Lob abgestumpft bin. Ich bin es auch gegen Tadel, Geringschätzung u. Misverständnis. Eine der Haupteigenschaften des Amerikaners dieser total misratenen Kulturprodukte ist seine Respektlosigkeit Abkömmling seiner Urteilslosigkeit kann aber meine erscheinen auf einer amerik. Bühne einen Brief von Ihnen veranlassen sollte will ich es einnehmen. […]“ - Pribram, zu dessen Freundeskreis Sigmund Freud, Josef Redlich und Ludo Moritz Hartmann zählten, emigrierte 1939 nach England, wo er schon vorher akademisch tätig gewesen war. Zu seinen Schülern gehörte mit A. J. P. Taylor der bekannteste britische Historiker des 20. Jahrhunderts..

buy now

Freud, Sigmund

Mediziner und Begründer der Psychoanalyse (1856-1939). Autograph letter signed ("Freud"). Wien. 1½ SS. Folio. Mit einigen Beilagen (s. u.).
$ 82,913 / 75.000 € (49342/BN33685)

To Dr R. L. Worrall, in German, thanking him for his interesting letter, from which he has learned much, and answering some of the points raised: "I know that my comments on Marxism are no evidence either of a thorough knowledge or a correct understanding of the writings of Marx and Engels. I have learnt since - very much to my satisfaction - that both in no way denied the influence of ideas and superego-structures. That invalidates the main contrast between Marxism and psycho-analysis which I had believed to exist.

As to the 'dialectic', I am no clearer, even after your letter./ For the evidence of the hypothesis of the human primal horde I must refer you to my sources, Darwin and Atkinson. I have no other arguments than theirs. Naturally I accepted from psycho-analytical experience and what it would have led one to expect"; adding that "I do not quite grasp the bearing of your question about the nature of Id. As far as I understand it I should answer in the affirmative" (translation by Ernest Jones). - Worrall had written to Freud querying his statement in New Introductory Lectures that Marxism attributes social change solely to economic forces, whereas he believed Marx and Engels took full account of social history and psychological factors; he also raised the subject of Hegel's Absolute Ideal, and enquired whether Freud's concept of an 'old man of the tribe' relationship in prehistory, as giving rise to the Oedipus Complex, derived from Atkinson's interpretation of Darwin - and specifically if the mental qualities characteristic of the Id are of prehuman rather than of human origin (see the copy of Worrall's letter to Ernest Jones, included along with Jones's translation; also included is correspondence between Worrall and K. R. Eissler of the Sigmund Freud Archives, New York). When he wrote this letter, Freud was already suffering from the cancer that was to kill him: he tells Worrall that his letter "deserve[s] a comprehensive answer" but explains that "to do that by hand would be too great an effort for my eighty-one years" and that "a personal discussion would be a pleasure for me". Six months later, Austria was absorbed into the German Reich, and three months after that Freud escaped to England, where he was to die in September 1939. - On headed paper ("Prof. Dr. Freud"); smudge to ink, tape-stains at edges especially overleaf, weak at fold..

buy now

Freud, Sigmund

Mediziner und Begründer der Psychoanalyse (1856-1939). Autograph letter signed ("Freud"). Wien. 1ı SS. 4to.
$ 38,693 / 35.000 € (60909/BN44808)

To an unidentified recipient, refusing an essay and referencing Carl Jung, who was at the time editor of the "Jahrbuch für psychoanalytische und psychopathologische Forschungen": "Your various remarks make it easier for me to answer your question as to whether we can accept your patient's biography. I am not the editor, though you do assume correctly that Jung would take my request into account. As an editor I would have reservations about accepting the essay, as it consists only of autobiographical material without any analysis and we need the space more urgently for other things than collections of material.

No matter how exact a self-account is, it is always something quite different from analysis, and cannot approach analysis even through an increase of details and sincerity" (transl.). - Left margin with punched holes (slightly touching letters), folds..

buy now

Freud, Sigmund

Mediziner und Begründer der Psychoanalyse (1856-1939). Autograph letter signed ("Freud"). "39 Elsworthy Road NW 3" (d. i. London). 1½ SS. 4to.
$ 30,954 / 28.000 € (60910/BN44809)

In German, to the unnamed psychoanalyst and neurologist Hermann Nunberg and his wife, about his reception in England after leaving Vienna: "We are doing very well here, much better than so many others are, unfortunately, for whom one wants to do something and yet seldom can. Our reception in London was decidedly friendly, surprisingly not only from followers and old friends [...] but also from total strangers who wanted to express their joy that we are safe and in England [...]". - "Freud arrived in London by train on 6 June 1938.

His reputation had preceded him to the extent that the train had to be re-routed to another platform at Victoria, so as to avoid the enthusiastic attentions of the press. Freud was greatly heartened by the cordial welcome he received, although he wrote to friends of his sense of alienation resulting from the move and his concern over the worsening state of affairs in Europe. He was particularly anxious about four of his elderly sisters who remained in Vienna, for whom visas were being sought without success. Freud did not live long enough to know that they all perished in the camps" (Oxford DNB). - Slightly spotty; folds..

buy now

Freud, Sigmund

Mediziner und Begründer der Psychoanalyse (1856-1939). Autograph letter signed ("Freud"). [Wien]. 1fl SS. Gr.-4to.
$ 49,748 / 45.000 € (60946/BN44952)

To Stefan Zweig, about the Nobel Prize, Shakespeare, and his "Moses and Monotheism", thanking him for his letter and for the cutting from the Sunday Times, observing that his article is the declaration of a friend, noting his surprise to learn that he has been awarded the Nobel Prize on the promptings of the Vienna University, referring to the opposition to him when he was awarded the Frankfurt Goethe Prize in 1930, reproaching himself for expatiating during his visit on the contents of his Moses, instead of letting him talk about his work and plans, stating that Moses shall never see the light of day again, concluding in a postscript by asking him whether he is interested in the debate concerning the identity of Shakespeare, and admitting that he is virtually convinced that Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford, was in fact Shakespeare.

- Despite the views expressed by Freud here, "Der Mann Moses und die monotheistische Religion", his last completed book, was in fact published four years later, in 1939. Although nominated twelve times for the Nobel Prize for Medicine, Freud was never awarded that honour, the Nobel committee being of the opinion that his work was of no proven scientific value. Romain Rolland's nomination of him for the Literature Prize in 1936 was also unsuccessful. - Horizontal fold, some light creasing and slight damage to edges..

buy now

Freud, Sigmund

Mediziner und Begründer der Psychoanalyse (1856-1939). Autograph letter signed ("Sigm. Freud"). London. 1 S. Gr.-4to. Mit eigenh. Kuvert.
$ 30,954 / 28.000 € (62294/BN45488)

Short but comprehensive letter to the Dutch writer and journalist Cornelis de Dood, about his just-published final work, "Moses and Monotheism". Freud apologizes for being unable to write more about Dood's "interesting letter", but his poor health will not permit to do so. He expresses his conviction that it is hard to believe that Moses found circumcision practiced among Jews, since all accounts indicated that the ritual was of Egyptian origin. - On headed paper.

buy now

Freud, Sigmund

Begründer der Psychoanalyse (1856-1939). Eigenhändiger Brief mit Unterschrift „Ihr Freud“. Semmering. Folio. 1 p. Gedr. Briefpapier.
$ 10,502 / 9.500 € (72531)

An den „verehrten Freund“, seinen Wiener Kollegen, den österreichisch-britischer Historiker und Universitätsprofessor Alfred Francis Přibram (1859-1942) in Erwiderung einer Karte aus Gastein: „Ihre angedachte Absicht mich hier im Sept[enber] vor der Abreise nach Amerika zu besuchen möchte ich aber nachdrücklich unterstreichen. [...] Es geht mir considering my many ailments nicht schlecht und ich erfreue mich einer ungewohnten allerdings durch den Sept[em]bertermin begrenzten Untätigkeit.“ - Pribram, zu dessen Freundeskreis Sigmund Freud, Josef Redlich und Ludo Moritz Hartmann zählten, emigrierte 1939 nach England, wo er schon vorher akademisch tätig gewesen war.

Zu seinen Schülern gehörte mit A. J. P. Taylor der bekannteste britische Historiker des 20. Jahrhunderts..

buy now

Freud, Sigmund

Begründer der Psychoanalyse (1856-1939). Eigenhändiger Brief mit Unterschrift „Ihr Freud“. Wien. Berggasse 19. 8vo. 1 1/2 pp. Gedr. Briefpapier.
$ 16,030 / 14.500 € (72535)

An den „verehrten Freund“, seinen Wiener Kollegen, den österreichisch-britischer Historiker und Universitätsprofessor Alfred Francis Přibram (1859-1942): „[…] Unter der Voraussetzung daß die Entscheidung bei Ihnen liegt bin ich aufgefordert worden Ihnen den jungen Mann dessen Gesuch Sie hiermit erhalten warm zu empfehlen. Ich thue es unbedenklich denn der Versuch einer ,Protektion’ scheint mir gerechtfertigt, wenn Sie dem […] zu Gute kommt. Ich kenne die Familie […] sehr gut […] Die Gemeinde Wien wird uns einen Bauplatz für ein PSA Institut schenken.

Aber wir haben kein Geld für den Bau. Die Amerikaner haben Geld für jede Dummheit aber es wäre wirklich unlogisch zu erwarten, daß sie etwas für die Analyse gäben […]“ - Pribram, zu dessen Freundeskreis Sigmund Freud, Josef Redlich und Ludo Moritz Hartmann zählten, emigrierte 1939 nach England, wo er schon vorher akademisch tätig gewesen war. Zu seinen Schülern gehörte mit A. J. P. Taylor der bekannteste britische Historiker des 20. Jahrhunderts..

buy now

Freud, Sigmund

Begründer der Psychoanalyse (1856-1939). Eigenhändiger Brief mit Unterschrift „Ihr Freud“. Wien. Berggasse 19. 8vo. 2/3 p. Gedr. Briefpapier.
$ 6,633 / 6.000 € (72536)

An den „verehrten Freund“, seinen Wiener Kollegen, den österreichisch-britischer Historiker und Universitätsprofessor Alfred Francis Přibram (1859-1942): „Die Post hat mir heute den Dank der Familie Balog gebracht den ich sofort an die richtige Adresse weiter befördere. Ich selbst habe unterdessen die Schwelle zwischen dem 72ten und dem 73ten Jahr überschritten merke aber nicht viel Unterschied. In der Hoffnung Sie im Sommer wiederzusehen […]“ - Pribram, zu dessen Freundeskreis Sigmund Freud, Josef Redlich und Ludo Moritz Hartmann zählten, emigrierte 1939 nach England, wo er schon vorher akademisch tätig gewesen war.

Zu seinen Schülern gehörte mit A. J. P. Taylor der bekannteste britische Historiker des 20. Jahrhunderts..

buy now

Freud, Sigmund

Begründer der Psychoanalyse (1856-1939). Eigenhändige Postkarte mit Unterschrift „Freud“. Berlin-Tegel. 8vo. 1 p.
$ 5,306 / 4.800 € (72538)

An den „verehrten Freund“, seinen Wiener Kollegen, den österreichisch-britischer Historiker und Universitätsprofessor Alfred Francis Přibram (1859-1942): „Bedaure sehr etwas so Seltenes und Erfreuliches wie Ihren Besuch versäumt zu haben. Ich bringe hier den Monat Sept[ember] zu um einmal meine Kinder und Enkel in Muße zu sehen und verfolge aber noch eine andere Absicht. Ich hoffe, dass Sie mich nach meiner Rückkehr im Okt entschädigen werden […]“ - Pribram, zu dessen Freundeskreis Sigmund Freud, Josef Redlich und Ludo Moritz Hartmann zählten, emigrierte 1939 nach England, wo er schon vorher akademisch tätig gewesen war.

Zu seinen Schülern gehörte mit A. J. P. Taylor der bekannteste britische Historiker des 20. Jahrhunderts..

buy now

Freud, Sigmund

Begründer der Psychoanalyse (1856-1939). Eigenhändige Briefkarte mit Unterschrift „Freud“. Wien. Berggasse 19. 8vo. 2 pp. Mit gedr. Adresse.
$ 19,346 / 17.500 € (72539)

An den „verehrten Freund“, seinen Wiener Kollegen, den österreichisch-britischer Historiker und Universitätsprofessor Alfred Francis Přibram (1859-1942): „Ich bin eben vorgestern von Berlin zurückgekommen, hoffentlich wieder für einige Zeit besser leistungsfähig u habe mich über Ihren Gruß sehr gefreut. Daß Ihre Vorlesungen großen Erfolg haben, kann mich nicht sehr verwundern. Mehr überrascht bin ich, daß Sie die Interpret[ation] of Dr[eams]. lasen ein difficiles Buch, das ich seit vielen Jahren nicht angerührt habe.

Leider muß ich grade jetzt eine achte Auflage davon machen u schiebe es vergeblich auf ob nur nicht das Schiksal […] gnädig sein will […]“ - Pribram, zu dessen Freundeskreis Sigmund Freud, Josef Redlich und Ludo Moritz Hartmann zählten, emigrierte 1939 nach England, wo er schon vorher akademisch tätig gewesen war. Zu seinen Schülern gehörte mit A. J. P. Taylor der bekannteste britische Historiker des 20. Jahrhunderts..

buy now

Freud, Sigmund

Mediziner und Begründer der Psychoanalyse (1856-1939). Photograph. [Worcester. 203:252 mm.
$ 719 / 650 € (62417/BN45695)

A later print of a group portrait of some 40 American psychologists with Sigmund Freud and C. G. Jung, taken during Freud's only lecture series in the United States in September 1909. A caption indentifies 26 of these scholars, including Henry H. Goddard (1866-1957; second row, at right). - Freud's lecture series is still regarded as the starting point of psychoanalytic research in the U,S.

buy now

Freud, Sigmund

Mediziner und Begründer der Psychoanalyse (1856-1939). Cabinet photograph signed ("Sigm. Freud"). O. O. 222:165 mm.
$ 38,693 / 35.000 € (62712/BN46033)

The classic photograph of Freud with cigar in hand, taken by his son-in-law, the photographer Max Halberstadt. - With the blind stamp of Max Halberstadt, Hamburg, on the mount; signed by Freud across the mount; mount browned and starting to chip. - Provenance: Acquired from Dr Robert Riggall of Northumberland House, a private mental asylum in north London, by a colleague, thence by family descent.

buy now

Freud, Sigmund

Mediziner und Begründer der Psychoanalyse (1856-1939). 4 autograph letters signed and 3 autograph postcards and lettercards signed. Semmering, Wien und Berlin. Zusammen 8fl SS. auf 7 Bll. Verschiedene Formate.
$ 71,858 / 65.000 € (72737/BN46755)

Amicable correspondence with a "dear friend", the historian Alfred Francis Pribram (1859-1942), mentioning an appointment before his departure for the U.S. (25 August 1927), recommending a young man "whose request you herewith receive" (27 February 1928), and communicating thanks from the Balog family (9 May 1928). The letter from 27 November 1928 is written after Pribram has left Vienna: "[...] There is something I dislike about your suggestion how to rectify the 'world order', that one ought to believe in reunion after death.

My feeling is, whoever is no longer capable of such belief should not regret it. A few months ago I felt an impulse to make a public profession of non-faith. But why? I could not say. The result of this urge was a little book, 'The Future of an Illusion', a copy of which I have requested the publisher to send you. Not exactly for purposes of consolation, for which it is ill equipped, but because I love and esteem you as a friend. I can but give what I have [...]". - On October 28, 1829, Freud mentions his "Interpretation of Dreams": "[...] It comes as little surprise to me that your lectures are so successful. I am more amazed to learn that you are reading the 'Interpret[ation] of Dr[eams]', a difficult book which I have not touched in many years. Unfortunately I must at this very moment prepare an eighth edition and am vainly postponing the effort, ever hoping that Fortune will be kind to me in the meantime [...]". - Slight traces of handling, but well preserved on the whole..

buy now

sold

 
Freud, Sigmund

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Sigmund Freud (1856–1939), Mediziner und Begründer der Psychoanalyse. E. Brief mit U. („Freud“). Wien, 16. Juni 1925. ¾ S. 8°. – Wohl an Arthur Schnitzler: „Montag 29 dM paßt mir sehr, es ist der letzte Tag, den ich vor dem Sommerurlaub in Wien zubringe. Ich kann Dich um 3h pM empfangen wenn Dir ein zerstörtes Zimmer nichts macht [...]“. – Auf Briefpapier mit gedr. Briefkopf.


Freud, Sigmund

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Sigmund Freud (1856–1939), Mediziner und Begründer der Psychoanalyse. E. Brief mit U. („Freud“). Wien, 10. Januar 1930. ¾ S. Gr.-8°. Mit einigen Beilagen (s. u.). – An die Schriftstellerin und Journalistin Helene Scheu-Riesz (1880–1970), die ihm am Tag zuvor einen Brief des amerikanischen Dichters Robert Haven Schauffler hatte zukommen lassen, der eine Frage enthielte, „die nur Sie selber beantworten können. Sein Buch hat auf mich einen so tiefen Eindruck gemacht, [...] und die Frage, inwieweit psychische Beeinflussung in einem bestimmten Sinn durch Dichtung möglich ist, beschäftigt mich sehr stark. Wollen Sie erlauben, dass Mr. Schauffler Ihnen sein Buch bringt? Er ist ein Mann von so ungewöhnlichen Qualitäten, dass nicht einmal Sie es bedauern werden, ihm ein Stückchen Ihrer kostbaren Einsamkeit geopfert zu haben [...]“ (ms. Brief v. 9. Januar 1930; hier als Durchschlag beiliegend). Freud nun schreibt ihr unterm 10. des Monats: „Ich gebe zu daß Herr Schauffler infolge Ihrer Empfehlung und seiner Beziehung zu G. St. Hall [d. i. der amerikanische Psychologe Granville Stanley Hall, 1844–1924] einen besonderen Anspruch darauf hat daß sein Wunsch etwas mit mir zu besprechen erfüllt werde. Aber mein großes Ruhebedürfnis – nicht der Wert meiner Zeit – steht dem im Wege [...]“. – Helene Scheu-Riesz wurde bekannt als Lyrikerin und Erzählerin für die Jugend, gab unter dem Titel „Sesam-Bücher“ in dem von ihr gegründeten gleichnamigen Verlag eine Klassiker Sammlung heraus und verfaßte Märchenbücher, Puppen- und Weihnachtsspiele; zudem war sie in der österreichischen Frauenbewegung und Kinderpädagogik tätig. 1934 in die USA emigrierend, lebte sie als Journalistin in New York und kehrte 1954 nach Wien zurück. Das erklärte Ziel der Gattin des sozialdemokratischen Politikers Robert Scheu war es, eine Universalbibliothek mit „guter“ Literatur für alle, insbesondere auch für ärmere Kinder zu schaffen. – Auf Briefpapier mit gedr. Briefkopf.


Freud, Sigmund

E. Postkarte mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Sigmund Freud (1856–1939), Mediziner und Begründer der Psychoanalyse. E. Postkarte mit U. („Freud“). [London], 14. Juni 1938. 2 SS. Qu.-8°. – Kurz nach seinem Eintreffen im Londoner Exil geschrieben und an einen gleichfalls emigrierten, namentlich nicht genannten Kollegen: „Dank für Ihre so freundliche Begrüßung! Ich werde mich sehr freuen, Sie zu sehen, nur daß es infolge meiner verschiedenen Infirmitäten nicht gut in Ihrem Hause sein kann. Man sagt mir, daß Sie sehr beschäftigt sind. Ich freue mich, daß Sie in der neuen Heimat den verdienten Erfolg gefunden haben und hoffe, Sie finden auch einmal Zeit für ein Plauderstündchen mit mir [...]“. – Der Briefkopf mit Freuds Namen und seiner Wiener Adresse und e. überschrieben mit seiner aktuellen, „39 Elsworthy Road, NW 3“. Freud war am 6. Juni in London eingetroffen und bezog zunächst ein gemietetes Haus an der Elsworthy Road, während sein Sohn Ernst und seine Haushälterin Paula Fichtl für ihn seinen Arbeitsraum in 20 Maresfield Gardens rekonstruierten.


Freud, Sigmund

E. Notiz mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Sigmund Freud (1856–1939), Mediziner und Begründer der Psychoanalyse. E. Notiz mit U. [Wien], 3. Januar 1930. 1 S. Qu.-kl.-8°. – „Mit herzlichem Dank und guten Neujahrswünschen | Freud“. – Auf Briefpapier mit gedr. Briefkopf; alt auf Trägerkarton montiert und etwas fleckig bzw. gewellt.


Freud, Sigmund

Kuvert mit e. Adresse.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Sigmund Freud (1856–1939), Mediziner und Begründer der Psychoanalyse. Kuvert mit e. Adresse. O. O. u. D. 1 S. Qu.-8°. – An „Herrn Dr. J. Weinmann | Wien“, d. i. Freuds Zahnarzt Josef Weinmann. – Die Verso-Seite mit gedr. Adresse.


Freud, Sigmund

Gehstock
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

[Sigmund Freud]. A late 19th- / early 20th century Austrian malacca cane with curved, silvered-metal handle impressed with diamond-pattern decoration, stamed mark of ‚O’ within diamond-shaped cartouche (handle dented, a little tarnished, plating rubber, later rubber ferrule). Provenance: Sigmund Freud (by repute; by descent to Freud’s son) – Jean Martin Freud (1889-1967, to his partner, F. M. Freud; a gift from her to the vendor). A cane said to be Freud’s, formerly the property of Martin Freud, and his partner Margaret Freud. From the property of Margaret Freud, given by her to the vendor, neighbour and friend.


Freud, Sigmund

Eigenh. Notiz mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

On a four-page letter, addressed to Freud by "Alexander Stiglitz, Ro√nava [Rosenau], Slovensko. C. S. R" (Eastern Slovakia) and dated November 20, 1933. Stiglitz describes some cases of stammering that occurred in his family and asks whether and under which circumstances a treatment of his brother might be possible: "I note that my father also began to stammer when he was 11, after falling on his head from a height of about eight feet; the impediment now concerns almost exclusively the sound K. His bother would stammer for some time, apparently without reason, but this ceased at age 19. In the case of my brother, the impediment worsened, especially in the last two years. At the moment, the spasmodically gaping mouth is highly characteristic. He stammers at every sound, most strongly probably at the labials M, P, F (but also A), somewhat less so at the gutturals. It distresses him; he becomes nervous, irritable, perspires. (Body weight 53 kgs, height 168 cm.) He works at my father's inn (with the elder brother) [...]". - Under Stiglitz's letter, Freud noted "Zur gefälligen Beantwort[un]g | 10/XII | Ihr Freud", leaving the reply to Paul Federn.


Freud, Sigmund

Autograph letter signed „Freud“.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar