Anna Freud

Freud, Anna

Psychoanalytikerin; Sigmund Freuds jüngste Tochter (1895-1982). Eigenh. Brief mit Unterschrift. London. 4to. 1 p. Mit gedr. Briefkopf. Luftpostpapier.
$ 943 / 800 € (77865)

An Maria (Mizzi) Pertlwieser, der sie für Photographien dankt. „[…] Es ist schön, daß Sie noch gerne an uns denken und die Erinnerungen an meinen Vater so in Ehren halten […] Paula“ [Fichtl, ihre langjährige Haushälterin] „ist noch bei uns und arbeitet viel wie immer […] Ich arbeite auch noch den ganzen Tag und leite auch eine große Kinderklinik. Mrs. Burlingham, die mit mir wohnt, arbeitet auch in derselben Weise. Ihre Kinder sind alle verheiratet und über die ganze Welt verstreut […]“

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Freud, Anna

Psychoanalytikerin und Tochter von Sigmund Freud (1895-1982). 13 autograph and 2 typed letters and cards signed. London, Walberswick u. O. O. Zusammen 17¾ SS. auf 18 Bll. 4to und 8vo. Mit 8 montierten Originalphotographien und 3 (1 eh. und 2 ms.) Kuverts.
$ 5,303 / 4.500 € (80898/BN52788)

The letters and cards, written in German to Lina Wintersperger in Vienna, contain mainly Christmas and New Year's greetings as well as thanks for birthday congratulations, but also speak of Anna Freud's increasingly difficult everyday life in her seventh and eighth decade of life: "[...] Here in England there are many troubles, but in our house and at work all is still well. The landscape in the picture is Ireland, where we always spend wonderful holidays [...]" (27 Dec. 1974). "Thank you for your letter, and I am sorry that you have so many difficulties, you yourself and in your family.

I, too, have assorted woes. I must still remain in bed for half the day, following a heart condition, and my old housekeeper Paula must go to hospital next week for an eye operation. So it is much the same everywhere, as you see. What I like particularly is the little photograph of your granddaughter. She looks a very dear and hard-working child, and to get 'straight As' is no mean feat, as I remember. Does she have any great wish? I would like to send her a little something [...]" (7 Jan. 1981). The photographs include scenes of Anna Freud in the garden and on walks, "England in autumn" and "our little country house in Ireland". - Some damage to several photos due to light, moisture, or rubbing; letters well-preserved..

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Freud, Anna

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Anna Freud (1895–1982), child psychologist. 11 autograph letters and lettercards signed. London, 20 November 1951 through 1 April 1971. Altogether 27 pp. in various formats. Includes 10 autogr. envelopes. Printed address. All to Rosita Grünberg, an acquaintance from Viennese days. The correspondence begins with the death of Anna Freud’s mother. – I. 20 November 1951: “[…] I know you felt at home with her, and she loved you and Michael [Rosita’s son] most dearly. She died very quickly, only 2 ½ days in bed, after a severe heart attack, without consciousness. Up until then she was as you knew her, active as always, somewhat weaker perhaps. She was greatly pained by the lessening of her eyesight, which greatly hampered reading and writing […].” – II. 29 August 1958. In the following years, Anna focuses on the development of the clinic: “[…] The weeks before summer vacation are always the hardest at our clinic, for this is the time when American colleagues come visiting, reports must be sent out, etc. […] Right now we are building a new school hut in the garden of no. 21 for our kindergarten group of blind children. Sometimes I am dizzied by all these individual undertakings, and I wonder from where I draw the courage […].” – III. 28 November 1960. Reflecting upon her old age: “[…] Both my elder siblings, Mathilde and Martin, are now over seventy. A very strange feeling, that our generation is now the ‘old’ one, in place of our parents […].” – IV. 11 January 1963. Rosita has been complaining of emotional sufferings: “[…] I am terribly sorry that you are so dissatisfied with yourself. For a beholder from afar, such as me, it would not seem so at all. Quite the contrary, you have achieved so much for yourself, training, profession, interests, in a way you yourself probably never expected. But still, the feeling is there, and I should like to help you to counter it. You ought not to help yourself with pills; that is not the right way. I truly believe one cannot help oneself in such a case, and you will hardly have the opportunity to undergo an analysis […] What you say does not sound all that abnormal at all, but it all shows signs of dissatisfaction, yearning for something. If one can consciously understand them and by some roundabout way lead them to satisfaction, everything will become much better […].” – V. 27 December 1963. Things have improved: “[…] I think it excellent news that you have taken a course in Psychiatric Nursing and passed so brilliantly. Psychiatric Nursing is, after all, a relatively new concept, and I believe it has a great future. Without trained nurses even the psychiatrists at the hospital or any psychiatrist dealing with an severe case cannot do, no matter how well trained they may be themselves […].” – The correspondence is continued in almost yearly intervals, with a lacuna between 1965 and 1971. – Includes: 5 photographs of Rosita Grünberg and her relatives, as well as a latter concerning family matters.