Albert Einstein

German-born theoretical physicist, 1879-1955

"Einstein developed the general theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics (alongside quantum mechanics). Einstein's work is also known for its influence on the philosophy of science. Einstein is best known in popular culture for his mass–energy equivalence formula E = mc2 (which has been dubbed ""the world's most famous equation""). He received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics for his ""services to theoretical physics"", in particular his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect, a pivotal step in the evolution of quantum theory. His intellectual achievements and originality have made the word ""Einstein"" synonymous with ""genius""."

Source: Wikipedia

Einstein, Albert

Physiker, Begründer der Relativitätstheorie (1879 - 1955). TLS in German, signed “A. Einstein”. Sarasota. 4to. 1 Seite. Briefkopf: „The Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton“.
$ 7,391 / 6.500 € (54426)

Einstein writes to Blanch H. Schlick, widow of Moritz Schlick. In full (translated): “I thank you for sending the most interesting lectures of your esteemed husband, who has made a lasting contribution to the philosophy of science in our time and whose influence continues unabated into the present. I repeatedly and carefully studied this lecture shortly after a severe operation, and had much pleasure in the clarity and sharpness of the arguments and no less in the masterful style. I would think that engaging with his literary estate is a beautiful life-work for you, which compensates you somewhat for the bitter and tragic loss, which you share with philosophically interested contemporaries.” In fine to very fine condition, with unobtrusive intersecting folds and a censorship stamp to left blank area.

When the up-and-coming German philosopher Moritz Schlick published his Space and Time in Contemporary Physics in 1917—which he described as an ‘elucidation of the thesis that space and time have now forfeited all objectivity in physics’—he found an instant fan in Einstein.

Touting the work as ‘masterly,’ Einstein recognized him as one of the first commentators to see that space and time have no existence or reality prior to the metric field, and the two began a correspondence that would last a lifetime. Securing the prestigious position as chair of Naturphilosophie at the University of Vienna in 1922 (with a recommendation from Einstein), Schlick surrounded himself with luminaries in philosophy, physics, and mathematics, heading the legendary Vienna Circle of thinkers, lecturing internationally, and publishing numerous influential essays. When he was assassinated by a former student on the steps of the University in 1936, the shaken intellectual world mourned the loss of one of the greatest minds of their time. Ensuring that her husband’s literary legacy would persevere, Blanche Hardy Schlick undertook the organization of his estate, editing and publishing past works, letters, and lectures, and sharing with the figures who helped shape his work. Thanking Schlick’s widow for her work and praising her husband’s “clarity and sharpness of the arguments” and “masterful style,” this is a remarkable letter connecting two legendary minds..

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German-born physicist, humanitarian and Nobel Prize winner; promulgator of the General Theory of Relativity (1879-1955). Autograph Letter Signed ("A. Einstein"), in German. [Berlin]. 4to. 1 page.
$ 34,113 / 30.000 € (60686)

Einstein on the value of relativity for philosophy. Einstein writes to Hans Reichenbach, the philosopher of science and an influential expositor of Relativity. In part (translation): "I am really very pleased that you want to dedicate your excellent brochure to me, but even more so that you give me such high marks as a lecturer and thinker. The value of the th.[eory] of rel.[ativity] for philosophy seems to me to be that it exposed the dubiousness of certain concepts that even in philosophy were recognized as small change.

Concepts are simply empty when they stop being firmly linked to experiences. They resemble upstarts who are ashamed of their origins and want to disown them." The letter was published in the Collected Papers of Albert Einstein, vol 10, doc 66, pp 323-324 (CPAE Translation, vol 10, doc 66, p 201). Slightly uneven toning, a few spots in upper margin, two-hole punch at left margin, folding creases..

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German-born physicist, humanitarian and Nobel Prize winner; promulgator of the General Theory of Relativity (1879-1955). Typed Letter Signed ("A. Einstein") with Autograph Postscript, in German Berlin. 4to. 2 pp. Punch holes. On his personal letterhead.
$ 39,799 / 35.000 € (60688)

Einstein writes to Reichenbach (1891-1953), a colleague and important expositor of Relativity, to suggest to him a clearer way of explaining one aspect of his theory. He opens the letter by saying (in translation): "I think the logical presentation that you give of my theory is indeed possible, but it's not the simplest one." After providing a list of four possibilities for "increasing specialization regarding the distant comparison of vectors" he comments: "Of course one can also start with an affine connection and specialize either by introducing a metric or by introducing integrability conditions; i.e.

do it the way you did. But this is less simple, less natural." He goes on to assert that "[t]he naturalness of the field of structure envisaged by me seems indisputable to me. I will only know in a few months whether this construction contains deeper traits of reality; for the problems needed to be solved to make this decision are not at all easy." The letter ends with a postscript in Einstein's hand, inviting Reichenbach and his wife to tea, noting "Schrödinger is supposed to come as well.".

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German-born physicist, humanitarian and Nobel Prize winner; promulgator of the General Theory of Relativity (1879-1955). A group of material related to Albert Einstein and the family of Adolph Stern Caputh, and Los Angeles, California.
$ 17,057 / 15.000 € (60689)

1. Guest book signed ("A. Einstein") with an original ink doodle of a stick figure peering through a telescope at a sailboat on a lake with a mountain in the foreground, April 4, 1929, Caputh, on the same page as a signature of Einstein's stepdaughter and secretary Ilse Einstein, 8vo, limp leatherette, guest book belonging to Mr. and Mrs. Adolph Stern. 2. Autograph manuscript equation in Einstein's hand, below a set of figures and equations in the hand of Irene Stern, on the verso of a page from a typed letter to Einstein, 1 p, 4to, toned. 3.

A collection of 52 photographs and photo-postcards, gelatin silver prints, 2 5/8 x 1 5/8 to 4 3/4 x 7 inches, a few captioned on verso in holograph, being candid shots of Einstein with friends and neighbors in Caputh, a few duplicates and including a group of approximately 27 negatives. 4. Head and shoulders portrait photograph, 9 1/4 x 7 1/4 inch platinum print by Aaron Tycko, 1933, Ambassador Hotel, Los Angeles, California, signed by the photographer ("Tycko / L.A.") at lower right, mounted within studio folder. 5. A group of correspondence including a 1 p ANS of Ilse Einstein; 2 pp TLS of Elsa Einstein; 2 pp ALS of Elsa Einstein with a photo of her and Albert onboard a Hamburg-Amerika ship; 1 p TLS of Margot Einstein; and related material. Provenance: Irene (Stern) Salinger; by descent to present owner. EINSTEIN IN CAPUTH, INCLUDING AN ORIGINAL INK DOODLE, CANDID PHOTOGRAPHS, AND EINSTEIN HELPING A YOUNG GIRL WITH A MATH PROBLEM. An eclectic group of material painting a wonderfully candid portrait of Einstein. The material originates with the family of the German-Jewish architect Adolf Stern, who along with his wife Elsbeth and daughters Inge and Irene were the Einsteins' neighbors in Caputh, the little village six kilometers south of Potsdam where Einstein spent his summers from 1929-1932. Along with the whimsical doodle of a man peering through a telescope at a sailboat beside Einstein's signature in the Sterns' guestbook, the collection contains numerous photographs of Einstein in moments of leisure with the Sterns and other Caputh neighbors and friends (including one of Einstein sitting on the laps of two elderly gentleman while smoking a pipe); picking apples with Elsa; with son Hans and two year-old grandson Bernhard; sailing; and photos of the Einstein house in Caputh. Also present is a large portrait photograph of Einstein, being one of a series done by Tycko at the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles in 1933, and four photos of Einstein with the Fred Hirsch family at the Highland Springs Resort in Cherry Valley, California. Also included is an unusual Einstein relic of great charm: a sheet of trigonometric calculations in pencil with an equation at the bottom in Einstein's hand, which according to the Stern family represents Einstein's attempts to help Irene Stern with a school problem..

buy now

Einstein, Albert

Physiker und Nobelpreisträger (1879-1955). Bildpostkarte mit eigenh. Unterschrift „Albert Einstein Kaputh 1930“. Kaputh. Quer-kl.-8vo. 1 p.
$ 2,843 / 2.500 € (62451)

Bildpostkarte von Einsteins Sommerhaus in Caputh, auf der Bildseite eigenh. signiert "Albert Einstein Kaputh 1930". - Die Tinte etwas verblasst.

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German-born physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Group of 4 letters Signed, "A. Einstein," each to Helmut L. Bradt, in German, including an Autograph Letter Signed, in green ink, and 3 Typed Letters Signed. Princeton or Saranac Lake. 4to. 2 1/2 pp. On blind embossed letterhead.
$ 28,428 / 25.000 € (62821)

All letters concerning Helmut L. Bradt’s emigration from Switzerland to the United States, mostly brief and enclosing copies of letters he has sent on his behalf [present]. ALS, [1939]: "I see from your letter that you are a worthy son of your unforgettable father. Your letters reveal a genuine love for research and at the same time a sensible attitude toward life, in that you are preparing yourself for a practical vocation without in the least forsaking your primary interests. So feel free to turn to me whenever you think that I can do something for you." 
25 March 1939: "Prompted by a letter from your sister in Haifa, I am enclosing a letter to the Swiss immigration authorities that will hopefully enable you to finish your studies in Switzerland.

I am also sending you my affidavit, so that you can emigrate to America later, when your turn comes. In the meantime, learn a practical trade if possible, because it can be very hard . . . to find a teaching job here." 
with--Three retained or photostatic copies of letters from Einstein, unsigned, in German, two to the American Consulate in Zürich, urging permission to allow Bradt to emigrate or sending an affidavit on Bradt's behalf; another to Dr. Albert Ehrenstein in New York explaining that his request was denied by the Swiss police to permit Bradt's mother to enter Switzerland from Germany. Princeton or Saranac Lake, 25 May; 26 July 1940; 19 February 1942 * Typed letter from the American Consulate General to Bradt, in German, denying him a visa. Zürich, 9 September 1940. - Most with the original envelope, including one bearing Nazi censor ink stamps and cancelled on 21 November 1941. -Helmut L. Bradt (1917-1950), born a Jewish German, managed to escape Nazi Germany in 1934 by enrolling at E.T.H. Zürich, where he obtained a doctorate in physics in 1939; he remained at E.T.H. until 1946, when he took up a position at Purdue University in Indiana. In 1947, he secured a visiting professorship of physics at the University of Rochester where he, with Morton F. Kaplan, recorded photographic evidence of a new atomic particle: the neutral meson. His father, Gustav Bradt, was a friend of Albert Einstein..

buy now

Einstein, Albert

Physiker und Nobelpreisträger (1879-1955). Signed portrait. O. O. 210:150 mm. Hinter Glas in Zierrahmen.
$ 13,645 / 12.000 € (33255/BN28186)

A black-and-white bust portrait photograph by John Graudenz (1884-1942); with autograph dedication to "[Youra] Guller, der wunderbaren Interpretin in Dankbarkeit / Albert Einstein / 1928". - Guller's first name has been scratched out. Small creases in the right margin, near the photographer's pencil signature, otherwise in good condition.

buy now

Einstein, Albert

Physiker und Nobelpreisträger (1879-1955). Typed letter signed. Huntington, N. Y. ¾ S. Gr.-4to. Mit ms. adr. Kuvert.
$ 8,528 / 7.500 € (33332/BN28393)

In German, to Manfred Hohenemser, expressing his delight that he was able to come to the U.S., thanking him for his letter, inquiring about a young physicist of the same surname and offering to recommend him, and warning that Jewish scholars cannot easily obtain a position at an American university. - Mounted to a sheet of black paper cut to size, vertical fold touching end of signature; somewhat wrinkled.

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German-born physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Typed letter signed ("A. Einstein"). Prob. Princeton. Large 4to. 1 p.
$ 7,391 / 6.500 € (33554/BN28787)

To one of his cousins, recommending him to visit Erich Marx, an engineer from Karlsruhe (not identical with the German physicist of that name, the inventor of the "Marxsche Röhre", who emigrated into the United States in spring 1941): "[...] He is also in a rather modest situation, but he knows this country, and perhaps he has some ideas or personal connections which could be helpful to you [...] Unfortunately my affidavits have always been turned down lately because I have submitted too many already.

Perhaps it would be better if your son quotes me as a reference and informs the person in question that I guarantee his reliability [...]" (translated from the German original). - On stationery with embossed letterhead..

buy now

Einstein, Albert

Physiker und Nobelpreisträger (1879-1955). Typed letter signed (“A. Einstein”). Princeton. 1 S. 4to.
$ 7,391 / 6.500 € (33805/BN29359)

In German, to Helene Katzenstein, widow of Einstein's close friend and sometime sailing companion, the Berlin surgeon Moritz Katzenstein (1872-1932): "I deeply feel what a difficult time you are having under the present circumstances. And I shall gladly do anything to rescue you from this unsatisfactory and depressing situation. I myself have experienced from close-up what trouble people can create for each other in everyday life when bound together within such a restricted space. Assume as philosophical a stance as you can and remember that a leopard cannot change his spots for all the sharness of his claws [...]". - On stationery with printed letterhead; traces of folds.

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German-born physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Autograph manuscript (fragment). N. p. ¼ p. 112:258 mm.
$ 34,113 / 30.000 € (44184/BN30218)

Draft of most of the final paragraph of Einstein's article, "Relativity: Essence of the Theory of Relativity", published in 1948 in the American People's Encyclopedia: "als sie zwar zu einer bestimmten Theorie des Gravitationsfeldes führt, aber nicht zu einer bestimmten Theorie des Gesamtfeldes (mit Einschluss des elektromagnetischen Feldes). Der Grund liegt darin, dass dies allgemeine Feldgesetz durch das allgemeine Relativitätsprinzip allein noch nicht hinreichend bestimmt ist". - The present draft shows the original text written by Einstein in German.

Written below by a different hand is the English translation as it was finally published: "while it leads to a well-defined theory of the gravitational field it does not determine sufficently the theory of the total field (which includes the electromagnetic field). The reason for this is the fact that the general field laws are not sufficently determined by the general principle of relativity alone". - An exceedingly fine autograph, wherein Einstein implicitly states why he spent so many of his final years searching for a Unified Field Theory. Written on the address side of an envelope addressed to him. Slight damage to edges, somewhat wrinkled..

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German-born physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Autograph manuscript signed ‘A. Einstein’. No place or date (1938 or earlier). Folio (277:225 mm). 1 p. on fine thin paper ("Pendrift Bond").
$ 85,283 / 75.000 € (60876/BN44726)

An important working manuscript apparently representing Einstein’s notes for a paper entitled “On a Generalization of Kaluza’s Theory of Electricity” which he wrote jointly with Peter Bergmann, and which was published in the Annals of Mathematics, vol. 39, no. 3, July 1938, pp. 683-701. Although the manuscript differs in many details from the published article (written in English), there are enough correspondences in wording, and also with respect to the equations to the section of the article headed "The Space Structure" to suggest very strongly a link between it and the 1938 paper.

In sum, the manuscript details part of Einstein’s attempt to construct a unified theory of electromagnetism, gravitation and quantum mechanics based on a curved five dimensional spacetime with five spacetime coordinates x1, x2, x3, x4, x0 and four spatial coordinates, one of which, x0, is periodic. Through every point it is assumed that there passes a closed geodesic given by x1, x2, x3, x4 constant. This particular approach is sometimes referred to as "Projective Relativity" and is a type of unified theory pioneered by T. Kaluza and later by O. Klein in the 1920s. Kaluza's and Klein’s ideas play a key part of modern Super String theory and are currently being extensively pursued by theoretical physicists. - After obtaining his doctorate at the German University in Prague in 1936 under the direction of Philipp Frank, Peter Bergmann (1915-2002) collaborated with Einstein, as his research assistant, at the Institute for Advanced Study between 1936 and 1941. In 1942, Bergmann published a textbook on General Relativity, Introduction to the Theory of Relativity, which contained a foreword by Einstein. We understand that Einstein presented this manuscript to the daughter of Luther P. Eisenhart, Chairman of the Mathematics Department at Princeton University. - Remains of mount on verso, light browning towards edges..

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German-born physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). A large archive of material featuring ten (1 autogr. and 9 typed) letters to Wsevolode Grünberg and a short autograph note by Einstein, an ALS by Elsa Einstein and 2 TLS by Helene Dukas. Accompanied by a large archive of Grünberg's papers, consisting of w Princeton (NJ), Peconic, New York and Saranac Lake (NY). I: Albert Einstein. Mostly 4to. Altogether 11 pp. II: - Elsa Einstein: 8vo. 2 pp. - III: Helene Dukas. 4to. 2 pp.
$ 62,541 / 55.000 € (62618/BN45770)

Grünberg, who later in life changed his name to Waldemar A. Craig, was an aeronautical engineer who developed an important design for the hydrofoil. The letters accompany a large archive of Grünberg's papers, consisting of well over 1,000 pages of material including some of his original drawings for his hydrofoil improvements, copies of his patents, (including a large dossier of declassified tests performed in the years immediately following WWI), photographs, correspondence, and other related documents and ephemera.

- Grünberg, the nephew of a close friend of Einstein, appears to have become acquainted with Albert and his second wife Elsa sometime in the late 1920s or early 1930s, if not personally, by correspondence. In an undated letter from Berlin, written sometime before 1932, Elsa Einstein commented to Grünberg: "I am assuming you are just as kind and clever as you uncle, our dear friend. My husband and I were so glad having been able doing this small favor for you. Mr. Dunne wrote a most gracious note to us from Florida. In particular I want to thank you for the delicious grapefruits [...]" and adding "Feel free to call on me anytime, if you think I could be of help. Please be sure and do". - Apparently Grünberg took her advice, and travelling to the United States in 1939 approached Einstein for an introduction to fellow engineers in the U. S. in order to demonstrate his hydrofoil designs. The two met in June 1939 at the home of Irving Lehman in Port Chester, New York. - In addition to the introduction to the American engineering community, Einstein also agreed to handle a complex inheritance matter for Grünberg. On 1 July 1939, the same day he recommended Grünberg to his American associates, he wrote to him that he had written "a most insistent letter to Mr. Plesch in which I suggested to name an arbitrator in the inheritance matter who would be agreeable to you as well as to me and who could personally communicate with Mr. Plesch and yourself". Enclosing the letter to Dr. Lewis, Einstein advised, "I cannot understand though, how you could succeed to find a position here without a valid residence permit. I urge you to carefully investigate this subject prior to making use of the enclosed letter". Einstein continued to assist Grünberg with the inheritance issue, acting as a go-between Grünberg in the U. S. and Mr. Plesch in France. - Despite some annoyances, Einstein did what he could for Grünberg both for his inheritance and his scientific pursuits - Grünberg's personal papers concern his research on his hydrofoil designs which he first developed in France. The archive includes some of Grünberg's original drawings demonstrating applications for his design as well as some manuscript calculations in his hand, some original U. S. patent certificates for several inventions, one German patent awarded to him in 1930, original photographs, likely from the early 1930s, and several magazines including Popular Science and others discussing Grünberg's work and designs. - Detailed description available upon request..

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German-born physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Typed letter signed. Princeton, NJ. 279 x 215 mm. ½ page. Single sheet of Einstein's blindstamped Mercer Street letterhead, typed on one side in German, signed in ink. Old folds, with the original typed envelope, marginal discolourations from old tape, a few small holes.
$ 7,391 / 6.500 € (72730/BN46747)

To Herman Schulman, ending their correspondence: "Ihre Andeutungen sind so geheimnisvoll, dass Sie einem handfesten Physiker Angstträume verursachen können. Ich gehe nicht näher drauf ein, weil ich den Eindruck habe, dass Sie die Sache selber nicht ernst nehmen" (translation: "Your intimations are so mysterious that they could cause a true physicist to have nightmares. I will not pursue this further because I have the impression that you yourself do not take the issue seriously").

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German-born physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). 2 typed letters signed ("A. Einstein"). Princeton, NJ. 4to. 2 ff.
$ 17,057 / 15.000 € (72752/BN46795)

To Dr. Alessandro Cortese. The first letter (July 28) concerns Cortese's visit ("If convenient I suggest Wednesday afternoon"), the second (August 16) was written afterwards: "I am grateful for the informations [!] you gave me on your visit last week. The realization of your plan to establish a[n] Institute of International Studies in Rome seems to me desirable; because such an Institute could vitalize that supra-national point of view which is so important for the solution of the international problems and could reach those persons who are most influential in this respect [...]". An unsigned carbon copy is recorded at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Archival Call Number: 59-452).

buy now

sold

 
Einstein, Albert

E. Briefumschlag
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Briefumschlag, Berlin, 24. März 1930 [Poststempel]. „Herrn und Frau | A. Einstein | Arndtstr. 57 | Dortmund (i. Westph).“


Einstein, Albert

E. Briefumschlag
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Briefumschlag, Berlin, 25. März 1929 [Poststempel]. „Herrn und Frau | Albert Einstein | […] | Dortmund-Gartenstadt.“ – Der Straßenname u. Ortsteil von Einsteins Ehefrau durchgestrichen u. ausgebessert „57 Arndtstrasse 57“. – Rückseitig mit Grüßen von Einsteins Frau „Auf baldiges Wiedersehen Ilsa“.


Einstein, Albert

Ms. Brief m. e. U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), physicist and Nobel laureate. TLS (“A. Einstein”). Princeton, 31 Dec. 1938. 4°. 1 ½ pp. on 2 ff. With addendum (see below). – To Salomon [!] Goldman: “I have just read your book with the greatest interest. It contains the true fire of a prophet; it mercilessly holds a mirror up to the contemporaries, Jews and Goyim alike. Your upright courage and optimism are a pleasure to behold in a man to whom nothing human remains foreign, not in scripture and not in world otherwise. Almost everything is spoken from my soul. I admit that I entertain lesser hopes for salvation through a union of the majority of Jews in a single country or even a state; no matter how we may think about this, the necessity of earnest striving for such a solution today is unavoidable. One must not deliberate whether our people in concentration would perhaps develop those dangerous and hideous weaknesses which we despise in our enemies today. I feel you do not afford the Greeks the friendliness and veneration which they deserve. I believe that we Jews have been strongly and continuously influenced by them in a positive sense due to our common love for the spiritual world, for independence in life and in thought. Your hymn to ‘Romance of a People’ is also good for those who have not witnessed that kitsch on stage; ‘Eternal Road’ was worse still, in spite of Werfel’s fine text. It is dangerous to transfer this great matter to the stage – especially as a whole. I particularly enjoyed the polemical articles ‘Jews and Christians’, ‘The Function of the Rabbi’, ‘Rabbis and Rabbis’; of immediate importance were ‘The Goal of Judaism’ and ‘Can Religion Change!’ [...] P. S. I beg an answer regarding the excellent Max Brod.” – On stationery with printed letterhead. – Includes: Jacob J. Weinstein: Solomon Goldman. A Rabbi’s Rabbi. New York, KTAV Publishing House, 1973. xiii, (1), 295, (3) pp. With several illustrated plates. Original cloth with giltstamped title to spine and original dustjacket. Large 8°.


Einstein, Albert

Ms. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), physicist and Nobel laureate. TLS (“A. Einstein”). Princeton, 3 March 1939. 4°. 1 p. – To Solomon Goldman: “In my telegram, I added the passage ‘IMMIGRATION ISSUE SOLVABLE ONLY BY COMPROMISE BETWEEN BOTH NATIONALITIES’ for the following reason: what we must fear, principally, is disenfranchising and plundering the people and classes who currently represent the construction efforts. This danger must be sought to be avoided first and foremost. That it is a serious one is beyond doubt. If the revision of this constitutional issue is burdened by inflexible constraints regarding immigration, then this threatens not only immmigration, but also the entire current wealthy class. This is why with heavy heart I wrote the last passage. Personally, I do not think it wise to omit it. Of course I see the possibility that you have a clearer view of the situation, and I authorize you to omit the passage if you are prepared to take full responsibility. I have no objection to a dinner being held for my 60th birthday – provided that a practical end can be reached by it. However, I will not be able to appear in person, as I have had to abstain from appearing in other very similar cases and it would be ludicrous to make an exception on this of all occasions [...]”. – On stationery with embossed letterhead.


Einstein, Albert

Ms. Brief m. e. U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), physicist and Nobel laureate. TLS (“A. Einstein”). Princeton, 17 May 1939. 4°. ¾ p. – To Solomon Goldman: “Surely you have heard of the important poet Arno Nadel, who is also known as a collector of Jewish folksongs and as a composer. He is currently the cantor of the Jewish parish in Berlin and will be killed by the Nazi brutalities within a short period of time unless he can be saved. I include a few biographical notes about him. Do you not think that there is a possibility of finding a place for this deserving man here, for example as a cantor? [...]” – On stationery with embossed letterhead; insignificant damage to edges; without the mentioned notes.


Einstein, Albert

Portraitphotographie m. e. U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), Physiker und Nobelpreisträger. Originalportraitphotographie mit e. Widmung und U. U. O., 1929. 236:176 mm auf etwas größerem Trägerkarton. – Schönes S/W-Portrait (Kniestück im ¾-Profil) mit e. Widmung am Trägerkarton für „S. Fischer, dem erfolgreichen Förderer literarischen Schaffens zum siebzigsten Geburtstage Albert Einstein. 1929“. – Weiters mit e. Signatur der Photographin Gerty Simon in Bleistift. – Der Karton mit einigen kl. Knickfalten, das Portrait bis auf einige kleine Stichlöchlein unversehrt.


Einstein, Albert

Ms. Brief m. e. U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), Physiker und Nobelpreisträger. Ms. Brief mit e. U. (A. Einstein“). Knollwood, Saranac Lake N. Y., 15. August 1944. ¾ S. Gr.-4°. – An den Violinisten und Komponisten George Perlman (1897–2000): „It was extremely kind of you to send me the two beuatiful [!] Vivaldi Concertos. I consider Vivaldi one of the greatest musicians of all times and your edition as a real achievement of lasting value [...]“. – Auf Briefpapier mit gepr. Briefkopf.


Einstein, Albert

E. Albumblatt mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), physicist and Nobel laureate. AQS ("A. Einstein"). N. p. o. d. [probably March 1929]. ½ p. 8°. – "Herr, verzeiht mir das Plagiat, | Das ich Ihnen mausen that | Ganz beschämt schleich' ich mich fort | Lass dem Gegner nur das Wort" ("My plagiarism pray forgive | I cribbed from you, I will admit | Full of shame aside I go | And surrender to my foe"). – On the reverse of a facsimile thank-you card to his 50th-birthday felicitators. – Slightly dusty and spotty.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Brief m. U. („A. Einstein“). [Berlin, nach 1917]. 1 S. 8°. – An den namentlich nicht genannten Physiker Emil Warburg (1846–1931): „Ich komme, um mich von Ihnen zu verabschieden. Es gelang mir nämlich, die Reiseerlaubnis zu erhalten, für eine morgige Reise nach Leiden. Falls Sie mir noch etwas mitteilen bezw. auftragen wollen, bitte ich Sie, mich zwischen 2 und 3 Uhr |Nollendorf 2807 | anrufen zu wollen. Leider kann ich nun morgen nicht zum Musizieren kommen, wie verabredet war [...]“. – Albert Einstein war im September 1917 in die Haberlandstraße 5 in Berlin-Schöneberg gezogen, wo er die oben zitierte Rufnummer hatte. – Etwas gebräunt und fleckig sowie mit einem kleinem Ausriß am oberen, perforierten Rand.


Einstein, Albert

Portraitpostkarte mit e. Widmung und U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), Physiker und Nobelpreisträger. Portraitpostkarte mit e. Widmung und U. O. O. u. D. 1 S. 8°. – „Der lieben Frau Lebach herzlichen Dank | A. Einstein“). – Die Bildseite mit einer Abbildung von Morris J. Kallems Einstein-Portrait a. d. J. 1942. – Kleinere Gebrauchs- und Montagespuren.


Einstein, Albert

E. Nachschrift (fünf Zeilen) mit U. („Dein Albert“).
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), Physiker und Nobelpreisträger. E. Nachschrift (fünf Zeilen) mit U. („Dein Albert“). Princeton, 29. September 1952. 4°. – Auf einem zweiseitigen Brief seiner Stieftochter Margot (geb. 1899) an Ogden Steinhardt, den Mann seiner Cousine Alice: „Lieber Ogden! Ich höre, dass auch Du in die 70er eingehst. Ich hab mich schon tief hineingelebt und weiss, wie es ist. Man braucht den Humor immer mehr, um Löcher zuzustopfen. Jedenfalls wünsche ich Dir Gesundheit und sonst alles Gute [...]“. – Margot schreibt u. a.: „So oft waren meine Gedanken bei Dir in den letzten Wochen – wäre Albert durch eine Venen-Entzündung nicht elend gewesen – u. wir etwas in Sorge – hätte ich bei Dir angerufen. Gott sei Dank geht es ihm viel besser – er muss aber noch viel ruhen u. das Bein schonen [...]“.


Einstein, Albert

Ms. Brief mit e. U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), Physiker und Nobelpreisträger. Ms. Brief mit e. U. („A. Einstein“). Princeton, 13. März 1935. ½ S. Gr.-4°. – An den Pianisten Józef Hofmann (1876–1957), den damaligen Leiter des Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia: „Es ist wirklich sehr liebenswürdig von Ihnen, meiner bei dieser schönen Gelegenheit zu denken. Es würde mir in der Tat die grösste Freude machen, Rossinis lebenssprudelndes Werk nach langen Jahren wieder zu geniessen. Ich habe aber für den Abend des 24. eine Einladung angenommen und kann es nicht mehr rückgängig machen [...]“. – Leicht knittrig und mit einer kleinen Notiz von anderer Hand am rechten oberen Rand.


Einstein, Albert

Eigenh. Nachschrift mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), German-born physicist and Nobel laureate. Autograph quotation signed. [Coq sur Mer, summer of 1933]. Oblong 8°. ¼ p. On a picture postcard written by the writer Antonina Vallentin (1893-1957) to her daughter Irène. - Nice quote regarding Einstein's passion playing violin.


Einstein, Albert

Portraitphotographie mit eigenh. U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Nice signed 3/4 profile shot of Einstein.


Einstein, Albert

E. U. auf Porträtdruck
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), German Physicist and Nobel Laureate (1921). Signed etching, 7.25 x 9.5 inch, Albert Einstein, n. p. n. d. A head and shoulders motif of Einstein. Signed on the lower white border. Also signed by the artist „J. J. Muller“ in pencil.


Einstein, Albert

Portraitphotographie m. e. U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), German Physicist and Nobel Laureate (1921). SP, 5 x 7 inch, no place, [19]54, one page 8vo. Nice portrait of the elderly Einstein sitting in a chair on his desk.


Einstein Albert

E. U. in "The Meaning of Relativity"
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), dt. Physiker, Begründer der Relativitätstheorie, Nobelpreis 1921 (verliehen 1922). The meaning of Relativity. The Third edition (revised) including the Generalization of Gravitation Theory. Princeton, Princeton Univ. Press, 1950. Mit e. U. Einstein auf dem Vorsatzblatt. Vorsatz lichtrandig. Umschlag leicht fleckig; an einer Stelle eingerissen.


Einstein, Albert

Brief m. e. U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), dt. Physiker, Begründer der Relativitätstheorie, Nobelpreis 1921 (verliehen 1922). Mit gedrucktem Briefkopf „Prof. Dr. Albert Einstein“. Faltspuren. Brief m. e. U., Berlin, 26. April 1927, eine Seite gr.-4°. An das Ehepaar Dernburg mit der Absage einer Einladung: „[…] Ich liege an einer schweren Herzkrankheit darnieder und halte es für ausgeschlossen, dass ich bis zum 6. Mai mit meiner Frau Ihrer liebenswürdigen Einladung Folge leisten kann […]“ – Im selben Jahr beginnen Albert Einstein und Niels Bohr ihre intensive Auseinandersetzung über die Grundlagen der Quantentheorie. Beiliegt: 1 Porträtfotografie, 10 x 15 cm.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), physicist and Nobel laureate. ALS “Papa”. Oxford, 30 May 1933. 4°. 1 ½ pp. Folded; traces of paper-clip. In German. To his son Hans Albert (1904–1973), endeavoring to explain his actions after an argument, and regarding his younger son Eduard (“Tetel”, 1910–1965), who had just suffered a nervous breakdown: “[…] I see now that I actually did you an injustice by misjudging the motives of your – nevertheless wicked – behavior toward me. The principal motive was the feeling of undeserved rejection and the need to take some sort of revenge. This, however, is quite erroneous on your part. My life is more strongly burdened with strain and duty than that of average people, and therefore one cannot place the same demands upon me as on them. It is not true that the women who live with me enjoy any privileges in this regard. And even if it were so it would be petty-minded to give it much thought. For we are men and must stand on our own feet and thus stand secure. – But in Zurich I felt that in spite of everything you have still remained the innocent boy of earlier days, and I enjoyed your company and also the conversation with you. I hope that you will also be successful in your independent work. But I know how difficult this field is, and human matters must always come first. I am not worried, by the way, that you will be consumed by ambition, the passion with undoubtedly gnawed away at our poor Tetel. His condition is bad, as he shows signs of an inward coarsening which contrasts with his former personality. At least I have the comforting feeling that he suffers less than he used to […]”. – Einstein’s second son Eduard was diagnosed with schizophrenia in 1930.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), physicist, Nobel laureate. ALS “Albert”. “Kaputh”, 4 July 1929. Folio. 1 ½ pp. On the reverse of his printed stationery. In German. Biographically important letter to his first wife Mileva Einstein-Maric (1875–1948), to whom Einstein was married from 1903 to 1919. At first, Einstein discusses a mortgage on Mileva’s house. He also mentions his son Eduard (1910–1965, “Tetel”), his new summer house at Caputh near Potsdam, and his passion for sailing: “[…] I quite agree with you. It would be better for tax reasons if you were encumbered with the house. So I would try to find out whether the interest rate of 6 % is not too high for Switzerland. If not, I would agree; if so, we could try to have the mortgage passed into other hands. My health has definitely improved, so that I can go sailing again. I now spend my entire summer at Kaputh in the country. So when Tetel comes he will find everything very nice and relaxing. The house isn’t finished yet, but we are staying at a temporary apartment right on the waterside. The new boat which I was given by rich finance people for my 50th birthday is wonderful, so fine that I am a little worried over the responsibility. I work a lot, but the evil spirit leads me in circles, so that I am still uncertain whether my new theory of electricity is any good or not [...] I hope that nature won’t be too strenuous for him. I think it would be an excellent idea for him to get away from home soon and learn to find his way about in life. I am telling you this because I can imagine that you [...] are strongly opposed to it. But think of Albert’s fate. Perhaps he would have fared better if he had gotten to know the world early. It would be especially good for him to go to England for a while to learn the language. What do you think?”. – Einstein applied for the construction plans for his house in Caputh in May 1929; these were granted on June 21, and construction of the house in Waldstrasse 7 began. During this time, the Einsteins rented an apartment in Potsdamer Strasse in Caputh. The house was finished soon, and Einstein could move in as early as September 1929. He was to live there until 1932. With the “Tümmler”, the boat mentioned, Einstein often used to sail on Lake Templin. – His second son, Eduard, was diagnosed with schizophrenia in 1930.


Einstein, Albert

E. Postkarte mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), physicist and Nobel laureate. APcS “A. Einstein“. Berlin, 1 March 1915. 1 p. Creased. In German. To his first wife, Mileva Einstein-Maric (1875–1948) in Zurich, to whom Einstein was married between 1903 and 1919, regarding financial affairs after their separation: “[…] By the same mail I have instructed the Kanton bank to transfer the obligations and the savings account into your name. I request you to do the same with the papers in Prague. The little children’s pictures gave me great pleasure. I thank you for them. You will receive the curtains […].” – In 1914, Einstein moved to Berlin with his family, where he was offered the post of director of the projected Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Physics. In June 1914 the couple separated; Mileva returned to Zurich with the children.


Einstein, Albert

E. Postkarte mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), physicist and Nobel laureate. APcS. “Yours, Albert Einstein“. Berlin, 15 Nov. 1915. 1 p. Creased. In German. To his first wife, Mileva Einstein-Maric (1875–1948) in Zurich, to whom Einstein was married between 1903 and 1919: “[…] Your letter gave me sincere pleasure because it shows me that you do not plan to sabotage my relationship with the boys. I, for myself, tell you that this relationship forms the most important part of my private life. In future I will arrange everything that concerns them with you, if you confirm your letter. I plan to go to Switzerland around the end of the year to see at least Albert outside Zurich and to spend a few days with him. Have you any special wishes concerning the place? […]” – In 1914, Einstein moved to Berlin with his family, where he was offered the post of director of the projected Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Physics. In June 1914 the couple separated; Mileva returned to Zurich with the children.


Einstein, Albert

E. Postkarte mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), physicist and Nobel laureate. APcS. Berlin, 26 April 1918. 1 p. In German. To his first wife, Mileva Einstein-Maric (1875–1948) in Zurich, to whom Einstein was married between 1903 and 1919, regarding details of their divorce: “[…] I give in for the children because I have now come to the conviction that you want to treat matters in a conciliatory way. It is clear that I would never let the children travel here on their own in times as these. Perhaps, however, you yourself will later take the view that you can send me the boys here without any misgivings. Meanwhile, I shall see them in Switzerland. Possibly the agreement could stipulate something like ‘outside the place of residence of Prof. Einstein’, rather than ‘in Switzerland’; I do not insist on this point, by the way. I hope to satisfy you to such a degree that you will feel urged to be similarly accommodating […]”. – Einstein and his wife had been living in separation since July 1914; they divorced on 14 Feb. 1919.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), physicist and Nobel laureate. ALS. N. p. o. d. („Thursday“). 8°. 1 p. In German. To his first wife, Mileva Einstein-Maric (1875–1948), to whom Einstein was married between 1903 and 1919. Einstein announces that after long consideration he has decided to leave the children in Kiel and travel to Geneva: “[…] After much reflection we finally did prefer to leave Tete in Kiel. The day after tomorrow, both the boys will go there; I shall be off to Geneva. Around the 1st of August (30, 31 or 1) I will come to you in Zurich, if you are there (if not, then write me: Commission de la coopération intellectuelle, Société des Nations, Geneva). Then I will go directly to Kiel and see the boys. Albert is a splendid fellow; Tete is clever, but of course still a bit of an embryo […]”. – With a letter by Einstein’s son Eduard to his mother on the reverse: “[…] I have given up sending you a poem every time; it is incredibly hot, and the heat exercises a most detrimental effect upon my brain […] On Saturday I shall be going to Kiel with Albert, while Papa will be going to Geneva at the same time. He will then be catching up with us in Kiel as soon as possible, so that we shall have almost 2 weeks together. During his trip he probably will also come to Zurich and visit you. Your will thus be alone for quite some time, but you can comfort yourself with the thought that it is also rather nice to be rid of us for a while”. – Regarding a sailing cruise with his father: “I have been sailing several times now and can now even steer a little by myself”.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), physicist, Nobel laureate. ALS. N. p. o. d. [early 1920s]. Large 4°. ½ p. To his first wife Mileva Einstein-Maric (1875–1948), to whom Einstein was married from 1903 to 1919. Einstein reports on a visit by his two sons: “[...] We’ll be spending a few for days of gaiety together before Adu [his son Hans Albert] must slip back into his leather breeches. The children are very nice and well-bred. Today we went sailing with my tiny boat. I am sorry to hear that the matter about the house is still unresolved. But if it goes wrong and you’d be living in your country, you certainly would be no worse off than now, not even regarding security. I am still doing scientific work with all my might, even more successfully than in many former years. An old boy such as I, after all, hasn’t got much else left in his head, apart from an enormous correspondence. This is the main reason for my having so little time for private life [...]”.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), physicist and Nobel laureate. ALS. N. p., 15 Oct. 1926. Folio. 1 p. In German. To his first wife, Mileva Einstein-Maric (1875–1948), to whom Einstein was married between 1903 and 1919. Einstein is critical about the upcoming wedding of his son Hans Albert and mentions “a presence of parallel hereditary defects in both families”. He also intervenes on behalf of Mileva’s brother, who was taken prisoner of war by the Russians in WWI: “[…] I receive your letter after a month of absence. I was in Düsseldorf (the naturalists’ convention), then in Holland and in Kiel with Anschütz [Hermann A., the engineer; 1872–1931]. I enjoyed the pictures of the cacti. It’s a proud collection. My business has not yet permitted me to get you your ‘Empress’. Biske wasn’t there and didn’t let out as much as a peep, either. I think I missed a European-Asian attraction here. I will make the inquires about your brother via the Russian ambassador here, whom I know rather well. I include Blenler’s letter. He mentions the presence of parallel hereditary defects in both families and advises against children. Albert has said that in such a case he would exercise reason. Anschütz is still very interested in him. He says – quite rightly – that to achieve a success matching his talents in his practical profession, Albert must acquire some form and polish. To judge by his old man and lady, there’s little enough hope for that. I’d be quite content if he didn’t engage in this precarious child-production business […] I look forward to Tete’s letter. Anschütz wants him in Lautrach again next year. If he goes, I will go there, too […]”. – Hans Albert married Frieda Knecht in 1927.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), physicist, Nobel laureate.ALS “Papa”. Zurich, 31 March 1928. Large 8°. 2 pp. To his son Hans Albert (“My dear Albert”), who had asked him for help in finding a job, and about his work on an ice machine: “[...] Your letter gave me much pleasure. I, too, would very much like to have you near me, and I shall seriously try to find you a position in Berlin. The difficulty is that others will have to do this, as one cannot well recommend one’s own son. Unfortunately, I cannot visit you, as I am diagnosed with a severe heart problem (dilation of the heart with high blood pressure and a low pulse). It is unknown whether I will improve substantially. In any case I shall have to lie in bed for months. This letter, too, is written in bed. Tete has developed splendidly. I see him almost every day, but I don’t live with Mama because my wife is with me. I am glad that you will be visiting us in June. You will be our guests, but we will have to accommodate you somewhere outside our apartment. The ice machine is coming along rather nicely. The A.E.G. are very interested. We have devised three very different types, one based on evaporation of methyl alcohol through water-jet pumps, the second one an electrical mercury pump which pumps the refrigerant with the mercury by the same principle as the water-jet pumps, the third a special kind of absorption machine [...]”. – Due to overexertion, Einstein developed a heart condition in 1928 and was required to stay in bed for several months. His recovery was slow and lasted nearly a year.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), physicist, Nobel laureate. ALS. N. p., 4 June 1928. Folio. 1 p. To his first wife Mileva Einstein-Maric (1875–1948), to whom Einstein was married from 1903 to 1919, regarding their children Hans Albert and Eduard: “[...] I will be happy to have Albert examined when he comes, which will probably be next Sunday. He can get a piano from me, I can work that out all right. However, I think it would be a better idea to get him a rather ordinary, cheap affair right now, as he won’t be staying in Dortmund forever. And later I’ll give him a good instrument, and we’ll resell this one. Don’t you also think that makes sense? So just leave the money in America. Now I understand why Koppel gave me that advice. I am doing better not not yet well. I still spend most of the day in bed. On the oether hand I can live quietly without the eternal duties and determents, which greatly helps me in my scientific work. Many greetings to Tetel. So he’ll be spending this year’s vacation at Scharbeutz near Lübeck, where we have rented a villa right on the sea together with Mrs. Mendel [...] I have just received Tetel’s long letter. Unfortunately, I cannot even think of traveling alone. I’m much too ill for that. But I’m convinced that the sojourn to the pure air of the Baltic Sea would to Tetel a lot of good. It’s mild on the Baltic, quite different from the North Sea, and the treatment they give you isn’t bad at all [...]”. – Due to overexertion, Einstein developed a heart condition in 1928 and was required to stay in bed for several months. His recovery was slow and lasted nearly a year. – After finishing school, Hans Albert studied engineering at the Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH) in Zurich and for some time worked as a construction engineer in Dortmund.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), physicist, Nobel laureate. ALS. N. p., 10 July [1943]. Folio. 1 p. Folded; with punched holes. In German. To hin son Hans Albert, who apparently wanted to join the Navy: “[...] That was to be expected. It ist true that I have a sort of advisory position for the Navy. But it won’t do much good because I have only very incomplete knowledge of the actual duties and other, able young men are working on the matter together on the spot. [...] It would be better for you, too, to find a more respectable association. So we did two things: 1) phone Trenton in order to speed up your citizenship papers. If it’s in Trenton or Philadelphia, all will be dealt with quickly; but if you’ve still got the papers down with you, you’ll have to keep poking to get the papers moved on. I’ll be able to let you know the state of affairs very soon. 2) I spoke to Prof. [Oswald] Veblen, who is in the war research organization, about your case. He has agreed to take an interest in it and requires a) an extensive curriculum stating your previous activities and achievements b) a statement of the addresses of all persons who can provide information about you. If one of them can be easily reached, you can ask him to write to Veblen about you himself, but this is not a requirement [...]”. – Einstein’s son Hans Albert emigrated to the US in June 1938. He worked as a research engineer at the Clemson Agricultural Experiment Station. Afterwards, he woked (until 1947) at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.


Einstein, Albert

Brief m. e. U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. Brief m. e. U. „Papa“, Princeton, 4. Januar 1945, 1 Seite Folio. Auf blindgedrucktem Briefkopf; gelocht. An seinen Sohn Hans Albert „Adu“, dem er Auskunft über verschiedene Personen erteilt sowie über die „Greenviller Idee“, an der er gerade arbeite: „[…] Frau Israel ist eine feine Person, die ich von Deutschland her kenne. Ihr Sohn Wilfried ist im Krieg tragisch umgekommen (Flugzeug). Wenn Du sie siehst, grüsse Sie herzlich von mir. Fred Hirsch ist eine flüchtige Bekanntschaft und ich habe keine Meinung über ihn. Karman war neulich da, ist immer noch der feine Kerl, schien aber gealtert und müde. Mit der Arbeit geht’s sehr gut, indem ich nun endlich die richtige Form für die Greenviller Idee gefunden habe, nachdem ich Berge von Papier mit missglückten Versuchen vollgekritzelt habe. Es wird bald so weit sein, dass ich einen Vergleich mit den Tatsachen machen kann […]“


Einstein, Albert

Brief m. e. U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), physicist, Nobel laureate. ALS “Papa”. Saranac Lake, 3 August 1945 (“Saturday”). Folio. 2/3 p. Folded. With envelope. In German. To his son Hans Albert, regarding an experiment which he discusses in detail: “[...] I think your model is very pretty and I have now understood what it’s about. A shaft drives two bodies going back and forth [...] Now I still do not know what purpose you envisage for it. Is it meant to control the valves of a motor? Or is the body with the adjustable amplitude meant to adjust the pumping capacity for the fuel supply to a cylinder? What problem made you come up with this pretty construction? Must one not expect an uncomfortably long response time for the adjusting lever? I hope you have quite dismissed your beer-born notion of ‘Albert as a political instructor’ [...]”.


Einstein, Albert

Brief m. e. U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. Brief m. e. U. „Dein Albert”, Princeton, 7. September 1947, 1 Seite Folio. Blindgeprägter Briefkopf. An seine erste Frau Mileva Einstein-Maric (1875-1948): „[…] Ich habe heute Deinen Brief vom 3. September wegen der für die Verkaufsverhandlung nötigen Papiere erhalten und sofort an unsere Anwälte Auftrag gegeben, diese Papiere zu verschaffen und an Dich zu senden. Auch habe ich – wegen der Abwesenheit von Dr. Nathan – einen zuverlässigen Freund in New York beauftragt, dafür zu sorgen, dass die Angelegenheit nicht verschleppt wird. Den Brief an Dr. Robert Meyer muss ich diesem Briefe beilegen, da uns dessen Adresse nicht bekannt ist. Ich bin Dir dankbar, dass Du trotz der für Dich bestehenden körperlichen Schwierigkeiten die Angelegenheit soweit gebracht hast, dass das Haus verkauft wird. Hoffentlich ist es Dir gelungen, dafür zu sorgen, dass Du in Deiner Wohnung bleiben kannst. Wenn aber nicht, so wird sich auch ein Weg finden lassen. Es ist gut wenn das Geld einstweilen auf den Namen der Corporation auf einer Bank deponiert wird. Sobald wir hier wissen, wo die Verkaufssumme hinterlegt wird, werden wir dafür sorgen, dass Du das Verfügungsrecht darüber erhalten wirst. Es wird gut sein, wenn Du uns mitteilst, in welcher Form dies zu geschehen hat, damit nicht wieder formale Schwierigkeiten eintreten. Ich habe gehört, dass mein Kollege Bargmann bei Dir gewesen ist, der, bezw. dessen Frau, es freundlicherweise übernommen hat, die von Albert gewünschte Geige hierher mitzunehmen. Es sind absolut zuverlässige Leute, sodass es keiner irgendwelcher Vorsichtsmassregeln bedarf. Es tut mir leid zu hören, dass Tetels Zustand noch immer zu wünschen übrig lässt und ich nehme an, dass er noch immer in der Anstalt ist. Hoffentlich wendet es sich wieder zum Besseren, wie es ja schon oft der Fall war. – Mir geht es soweit ordentlich, wenn ich auch nicht mehr so arbeitsfrisch bin wie früher. Ich möchte nicht gern erleben, dass ich für nichts mehr gut bin, aber jeder hat es zu nehmen wie es kommt […]“ – 1930 erkrankte Eduard „Tete“ an Schizophrenie. Er starb 1965 im „Burghölzli“, einem psychiatrischen Sanatorium in Zürich.


Einstein, Albert

E. Postkarte mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Postkarte m. U., Berlin, 7. Januar 1920, 1 ½ Seiten. An den Staatsanwalt Dr. Zürcher in Zürich: „[…] Auf Wunsch meiner Frau habe ich das Geld, was ich bisher bei Herrn Karr für meine Familie liegen hatte, in Ihre Hände gelangen lassen. Hoffentlich haben Sie es erhalten. Heute schicke ich weitere 5000 M[ark] an Sie ab zu dem gleichen Zweck. Das Geld soll jetzt nur im Notfall umgewechselt werden, da das reale Wertverhältnis Mark/Franc doch erheblich grösser ist als das Kursverhältnis (11/100), sodass Umwechslung wahrscheinlich unvorteilhaft. In einigen Monaten kann ich Ihnen wieder Schweizer Geld senden, da ich im Ausland verschiedentlich etwas Geld verdienen werde. Ich zweifle sogar immer noch daran, ob ich meine Familie umziehen lassen soll. Vielleicht kann ich es doch einrichten, dass sie dort bleiben. Ich bitte Sie inständig, mich über den Stand meiner dortigen Familie so aufzuklären, dass ich weiss, was ich Zangger [Einsteins Freund, der Gerichtsmediziner u. Physiologe Heinrich Zangger; 1874-1957] in Wirklichkeit an Geld schuldig bin. Von ihm kann ich es nicht herauskriegen. Wenn nötig komme ich einmal eigens nach Zürich, um alles zu besprechen und zu ordnen […] Auch was ich meiner Frau schuldig bin, möchte ich gerne wissen. Sie darf unter keinen Umständen zu Schaden kommen.“


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), physicist, Nobel laureate. ALS. N. p. o. d. [c. 1932]. Narrow folio. 1 ½ pp. Browned; folded; tear to edge. In German. Important letter to his first wife, Mileva Einstein-Maric (1875–1948): “[...] I am very sorry that Tetel’s illness has worsened so much. I still will not be coming to Zurich because I have the certain feeling that you are not keeping an honest relationship with me. I shall express it clearly for the last time: you can then settle on your course of action with yourself and your own conscience. When I received the Nobel prize, I left it to you with the purpose of ensuring your future and that of the children. I wanted to convey quite clearly that this sum – which was all I had in those days – was to be taken into account for the children’s inheritance upon my death. This is the only way how I can remain in a position to provide sufficiently for other people close to me. I neglected to make this clear. I have frequently written to you and Tetel, trying to clear up this point, but received nothing but evasive answers. Instead, you have tried to worm money out of me at every opportunity, which only makes my situation worse and worse. Several years ago I lent you a sum which you never repaid me. Under these circumstances it is not surprising that I have come to the conviction that you are taking a dishonest position towards me. It is up to the three of you to re-establish my faith by sending me a legally binding declaration which either states that the Nobel prize is to be credited against the children’s inheritance or that you will not contest my will. As long as I am not in possession of such a legally binding declaration I must assume that you entertain dishonest designs against me, and I am determined to adjust my actions accordingly. I know that you have not told the children at all that I gave you the Nobel prize in its entirety. Quite the contrary – in Zurich you kept trying to create the impression that I was discriminating against you and the children. I am sending a copy of this letter to Albert so that I can be sure that your behavior towards me is based on everyone’s complete knowledge of the circumstances. Tetel shall be involved in the matter only when you and Albert have agreed on the attitude that you wish to adopt [...]”.


Einstein, Albert

2 Schriftstücke m. e. U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), physicist, Nobel laureate. 2 DS “Albert Einstein”. Berlin, 1 Feb. 1924. Folio. 3 pp. 1 letter on typing paper; slightly waterstained; folded; both letters stapled together. In German. Letter to his first wife Mileva Einstein-Maric (1875–1948): “[...] I am sending you the second copy of my letter to Messrs. Ladenburg, Thalmann & Co. in New York, which you will please read carefully and then send to the said company after adding your instructions regarding the interest. I am adding a copy of the letter to the company for your records. By these instructions to the bank I am fulfilling that paragraph of our contract stipulating that in the event of our divorce and my receiving the Nobel prize, the prize money shall become your property. The letter also conforms to the provision [...] that you shall have free disposal of the interest, but can dispose of the capital only with my consent. My actions are at variance with the contract only in that I have deposited the capital in a North American and not a Swiss bank, because I think this safer and more advantageous for you and the children in view of the circumstances which have arisen due to the war after the conclusion of the contract [...]”. – The second letter to Ladenburg, Thalmann & Co. in New York in the same matter: “[...] I hereby request you to note that the property of all assets on this account has been transferred by agreement to Mrs. Mileva Einstein, with the qualification that Mrs. Mileva Einstein or, respectively, in the case of her death, her children, can freely dispose of the interest, but can dispose of the capital only with my consent during my lifetime. My consent to such directives regarding the capital will be expressed by my counter-signature on the relevant letters by Mrs. Mileva Einstein [...] Upon my death, all such restrictions placed on Mrs. Mileva Einstein or, after her death, on her children, are to be dropped [...]”. – Includes: letter by Ladenburg, Thalmann & Co. to Mileva Einstein; New York, 28 Feb. 1924; 4°, 1 p. With printed letterhead. In German: “We are in receipt of your correspondence of Feb. 9, the content of which we have noted in its entirety, and will act according to your instructions. As we have notified Professor Dr. Albert Einstein in Berlin by today’s mail, we are satisfied by your having quoted Professor Einstein’s letter of Feb. 1, 1924 verbatim, and therefore do not require you to send us your copy of this letter [...]”.


Einstein, Albert

Typed letter signed „A. Einstein“.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar


Einstein, Albert

Typed Postcard Signed ("A. Einstein") with Autograph Salutation and Postscript, in German.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar


Einstein, Albert

3 eigenh. Zeilen mit U. ("A. E.").
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Einstein is responding (in German) to the question put by his correspondence partner "What is the best way for an individual to contribute to a world of better understanding?": "Dem A. in ruhiger Art sagen, wie wohl der B. unter den obwaltenden Umständen denken und fühlen mag" ("To tell A. in quiet way how B. would think and feel under the prevailing circumstances"). - Henry D. Isaac, the one who wrote to Einstein on September 15, 1954, tells of himself: "[...] I come from Berlin [...] my late father was the closest friend of Dr. Carl Heinrichsdorff, the brother-in-law of your late cousin, Mr. Rudolf Moss, whom I personally knew too".


Einstein, Albert

Gedruckte Karte mit Danksagung für Glückwünsche u. eigenh. Unterschrift „A. Einstein.“
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

„May I send you my warm thanks for your gracious message of congratulation on the occasion of my birthday. It was most thoughtful of you to remember me“.


Einstein, Albert

E. Bildpostkarte mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Bildpostkarte m. U. „Papa“, Dahlem [Berlin], 10. September 1914 [Poststempel], 1 Seite kl.-8°. Kurz nach seiner Trennung von seiner ersten Frau Mileva an seinen Sohn Hans Albert „Albert Einstein junior“: „[…] Ich packe gerade alle Sachen für Euch ein. Sei herzlich gegrüsst und schreib auch alle 2 Wochen. Ich werde Dir regelmässig antworten. Sei mit Tete geküsst von Deinem Papa“. – Die Bildpostkarte zeigt ein gemaltes Motiv der Prager Innenstadt. – Im Jahr 1914 zog Einstein mit seiner Frau Mileva und deren Kinder nach Berlin, wo er die Stelle des Direktors des zu gründenden Kaiser-Wilhelm-Instituts für Physik angeboten bekommt. Im Juni 1914 trennen sich Albert Einstein und Mileva. Sie fährt mit den Kindern zurück nach Zürich.


Einstein, Albert

E. Postkarte mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Postkarte m. U. „Papa“, o. O. [Berlin], 25. Dezember 1915, 1 Seite 8°. An seinen Sohn Hans Albert (1904-1973) in Zürich nach der Trennung von seiner Frau Mileva im Jahr zuvor: „[…] Schon lange hat mich nichts mehr gefreut wie Deine Karte mit Eurem und des kleinen Zürchers wohlgelungenen Bildern. Immer wieder nehme ich sie aus der Brieftasche und betrachte sie. Du musst Dich nun aber noch die paar Monate gedulden, mein Sohn. Ich bin für die viele Fahrerei zu ermüdet, habe nur kurz Zeit und scheue auch die grosse Geldausgabe. Dafür werde ich mich im April umso mehr mit Dir beschäftigen. Du kannst vorläufig auf dem Zürichberg herumpurzeln auf Deinen neuen Rutschhölzern; geh nur recht viel hinaus, dass Du kräftig wirst. Nimm sicher mit Tete das Chlorkalzium, von dem ich Dir gestern schrieb […]“


Einstein, Albert

E. Postkarte mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Postkarte m. U. „Papa“, o. O. [Berlin] u. D. [16. März 1916], 1 ½ Seiten 8°. An seinen Sohn Hans Albert (1904-1973) in Zürich: „[…] Die kuriose Unterschrift in meinem letzten Schreiben ist dadurch zu erklären, dass ich öfter in meiner Zerstreutheit statt mich selber die Person unterschreibe, an die der Brief gerichtet ist. Anfang April werde ich also versuchen, nach Zürich zu kommen. Wenn man mich nicht hinauslässt, treffen wir uns an der Grenze (Gottmadingen bei Schaffhausen). Ich wohne jedenfalls im Gasthaus, sodass wir ganz allein sein werden, ohne dass ein Fremder dabei ist. Ich gratuliere Dir zu dem bestandenen Examen. Welche Schule besuchst Du jetzt? Du machst noch so viele Fehler beim Schreiben. Du musst in dieser Beziehung aufpassen; es wirkt zu komisch, wenn einer die Worte falsch schreibt. Am liebsten wäre ich ausserhalb Zürichs mit Dir beisammen, weil in Zürich zu viele Menschen sind, die ich kenne. Die Hauptfrage ist, ob ich hinüber kann. Küsse an Tete […]“ – Im Juni 1914 trennten sich Albert Einstein und Mileva. Sie zog mit den Kindern zurück nach Zürich.


Einstein, Albert

E. Postkarte mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Postkarte m. U. „Papa“, Berlin, 26. September [1916], 1 Seite 8°. Mit e. Absenderangabe „A. Einstein“. An seinen Sohn Hans Albert (1904-1973) in Zürich: „[…] Ich schreibe Dir jetzt das dritte Mal, ohne von Dir eine Antwort zu bekommen. Erinnerst Du Dich nicht mehr an Deinen Vater? Sollen wir uns nicht einmal wieder sehen? Von meinen Freunden Zangger und Besso höre ich mit grosser Befriedigung, dass es Mama wieder besser geht. Ich habe der Tante zweimal nach Neusatz geschrieben […] Wenn Sie noch nicht bei Euch ist, so schreibt ihr recht bald. Sie hängt sehr an Euch und erhält nie einen Brief […]“ – Im Juni 1914 trennten sich Albert Einstein und Mileva. Sie zog mit den Kindern zurück nach Zürich.


Einstein, Albert

E. Postkarte mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Postkarte m. U. „Papa“, Zürich, „Donnerstag“ [Poststempel:6. April 1916], 1 Seite kl.-8°. An seine Söhne Hans Albert (1904-1973) und Eduard (1910-1965) in Zürich: „[…] Soeben bin ich hier angekommen. Ich wohne im Hotel Gotthard Bahnhofstr. ganz neben dem Bahnhof Zimmer No. 50 und freue mich unbändig, Euch zu sehen. Ich erwarte Euch morgen (Freitag) Vormittag zwischen 9 und 12 Uhr im Hotel […]“ – Im Juni 1914 trennten sich Albert Einstein und Mileva. Sie zog mit den Kindern zurück nach Zürich.


Einstein, Albert

E. Postkarte mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Postkarte m. U. „Euer Papa bzw. Albert“, Zürich, 12. Januar o. J. [1919], 1 Seite 8°. An seine erste Frau Mileva Einstein-Maric (1875-1948) und seinen Sohn Hans Albert (1904-1973): „[…] Euer Brief hat mich sehr gefreut. Ich will auf die Angelegenheit mit dem raren Vogelfutter gern zurückkommen, wenn ich wieder nach Zürich komme. Einstweilen (bis zum 19.) muss ich in geschäftlicher Angelegenheit verreisen. Wenn ichs einrichten kann, gehe ich für ein paar Tage zu Tete [sein Sohn Eduard] nach Arosa. Als gestern Adu [sein Sohn Hans Albert] mit dem Brief ankam, war ich zuhause, aber man suchte nicht richtig nach mir. In 2 Stunden geht mein Zug ab. Mit der Gesundheit geht es mir übrigens unvergleichlich besser als letztes Jahr […]“ – Sein Sohn Eduard befand sich zu dieser Zeit in einem Sanatorium in Arosa.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), physicist and Nobel laureate. ALS. N. p., 13 June 1919. Large 4°. 1 2/3 pp. Folded. In German. To his son Hans Albert (1904–1973): “[…] Yesterday I received your kind, long letter. I write back immediately since there would be no time otherwise, for on July 1st I aim to be in Zurich. I will be coming alone this time and will again stay at the ‘Sternwarte’ guesthouse. I hope I don’t forget the photographic plates documenting your childhood! I greatly look forward to seeing you again. My doctor won’t permit me a proper hike because he says I wouldn’t get the right food. But we could take a room somewhere high up from where one can take nice walks (or somewhere we could go sailing)? Early August would be an option, as my lectures finish just before then. Unfortunately, my mother is dying in Lucerne. She will die within a year and is suffering dreadfully. So I will have to be there frequently, of course. Your question about the sail is not as simple as you imagine. I will tell you about it and many other things when we’re together. I find your remark about Heller’s compositions very funny. Tell Mama to plan her finances because I will not be able to send the money as promptly as usual this July. The foreign exchange is being tremendously difficult. It’s a good thing that I receive something for my lectures in Zurich, even though it’s not much. My health is fine because I am very well taken care of. But I must keep a strict diet and may not over-exert myself physically. I am pleased by your detailed account of your school. I had not much use for history myself; but I think that has more to do with the way it’s taught than with the subject proper. Taken for itself, after all, it’s very interesting what people were up to in former days. Perhaps we could take Tete along, as I’m not allowed to walk so much anyway. But let’s not go to Rheinfelden, that would not be at all recreational for me, and this is to be my only recreation this year […]”. – With a note to his son Eduard with birthday wishes: “[…] Your letter gave me much pleasure. It does really contain everything really important. I look forward to seeing you in Zurich soon […]”. – Einstein’s mother Pauline died in February 1920. She spent the last months of her life with her son in Berlin.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Brief m. U. „Papa“, o. O., 28. November o. J. [1924], 1 Seite gr.-4°. Einstein schreibt an seine beiden Söhne Hans Albert (1904-1973) und Eduard (1910-1965) „Meine lieben Kinder“ über deren Tätigkeiten er sich sehr freut: „[…] Dir l[lieber]. Tete vor allem meinen Glückwunsch zu der so wohlgelungenen Zeichnung bezw. zu der durch sie erlangten Uhr. Dies Talent hast Du sicher nicht von Deinem Vater. Und über Deinen Schaffenseifer, l[ieber]. Albert hab ich mich nicht minder gefreut, über das gute Examen, vor allem aber darüber, dass Du die ganzen Vermessungs-Rechnungen ohne vollständige Anleitung allein gemacht hast. Ich weiss, was dies für eine Energie Leistung bedeutet. Ob ich Euch noch besuchen kann vor meiner Reise nach Südamerika, weiss ich nicht. Das Schiff geht am 5. März in Hamburg ab. Schade, dass ich keinen von Euch mitnehmen kann, da es doch die Schule nicht zulässt. So reise ich ganz allein. Im Sommer komme ich dann auch nach Kiel, wo wir alle drei zusammen sein wollen. Tete muss auch einmal tüchtig segeln. Das ist die beste Stärkung für die Gesundheit. Ich liege gerade an einer bockigen Influenza im Bett. Es ist aber schon besser. Du hast recht, dass Du im Sommer nach Kiel gehst, l[ieber]. Albert. Das verpflichtet Dich zu nichts, und Du lernst […] dabei. Für das Theoretische bin ich zu Deiner Verfügung. Ich freue mich viel mehr darauf als auf die Reiserei nach Amerika […] Ich war neulich in der ‚heil[igen]. Johanna’ von B. Shaw. Es ist ein grossartiges Stück, das Ihr lesen oder sehen müsst […]“


Einstein, Albert

E. Postkarte mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Postkarte m. U. „Papa“, o. O. [Berlin], 22. Juni 1925, 1 ½ Seiten 8°. Gebräunt. An seinen Sohn Eduard „Lieber Tete“ (1910-1965): „[…] Eben kam Brief von Bergson des Inhaltes, dass es noch ganz unbestimmt sei, wann unsere Sitzung stattfinden kann. Also lade ich Mama und Dich ein, gleich zu Beginn Deiner Ferien zu uns zu kommen und bei uns zu wohnen. Wenn sie es so nicht will, dann komme Du allein zu uns; wenn sie auch das nicht will, dann wohnst Du in der Katzenstein’schen Klinik. Ich kann im Juli noch nicht von hier weg, teils, weil ich so lange abwesend war, teils weil mich wichtige wissenschaftliche Arbeiten hier festhalten. Die Kakteen sind meist in gutem Zustand und werden von Margot gut behandelt. Einige sind an den Reisefolgen nachträglich gestorben. Die anderen werden im Zimmer gehalten und kriegen nur alle paar Tage etwas Wasser. Es wäre aber sehr gut, wenn Mama den Transport nach Zürich selbst besorgte. Anfang August gehen wir noch nach Kiel, sodass wir dort noch einige Zeit zu 3 sind […]“


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), physicist and Nobel laureate. ALS “Papa“. [Berlin], 22 June [1925]. Large 8°. 2 pp. In German. To his first wife, Mileva Einstein-Maric (1875–1948): “[…] On the 11th we start the session, which will last until the end of July. I will probably be free between the 13th and the 20th. I therefore suggest that you go away with Tete until August 1 and then turn him over to me. I’d then like to take him somewhere in the mountains for 2 weeks, perhaps to the Engadine, but some place where it’s not so expensive. The main thing is the altitude and the sun. You might also want to make inquiries. I am told to seek the mountains for my health, and it will surely do Tete a lot of good, too. Do you agree? You could also come along for a bit if you aren’t worried about the talk it would raise; personally, I don’t mind these things at all (I have become completely hardened in this respect). Albert wrote to me twice, but only when he wanted something from me, not out of an inner need. But I understand that rather well. I acted quite similarly when I was in his position. Tete’s letters give me much pleasure. I think it is very important for me to spend as much time as possible with him during this time of his turbulent development. […] Tetel shall not be angry with me for not writing to him. I am so busy that time and strength will not suffice. But I am happy every day when I think of him […]”.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), Nobel laureate in physics. ALS “Papa”. N. p., 23 Feb. 1927. Large 4°. 1 p. Folded. In German. To his son Hans Albert, regarding his fiancée and later wife Frieda Knecht: “[…] I am pained to hear that you now want to let your wife come. She will never let go of you and will draw you from one disaster to the next. If you find it so boring in Dortmund, why don’t you give up your position there and come here. It will be interesting and a change of pace for you. It all comes from her having seized you first, which is why you now view her as the embodiment of femininity. It is, after all, a common way for sillies to fall victim to fate. In any case: never send or bring Miss Knecht to me, for the way things are, I simply could not bear it. If, however, you ever feel the urge to separate from her, then do not be proud, but confide in me, so that I may help you. For that day will come. Think about whether you really want to stay in Dortmund, or whether I should look for something for you here. That would not be difficult for me; and it would be much more interesting and educating than in Dortmund. If so, must it be in steel engineering, or would a wider field do as well? Where do you take your meals? Are you staying at a boarding house? Be careful not to ruin your stomach, this is so often the case with young persons who are unaccustomed to taking care of themselves [...]”. – Hans Albert studied engineering at the Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH) in Zurich and for some time worked as a construction engineer in Dortmund. He married Frieda Knecht in 1927.


Einstein, Albert

E. Postkarte mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger. E. Postkarte m. U., Berlin, 8. Juli 1920, 1 Seite quer-kl.-8°. Berieben u. knitterig, 3 geklebte Einrisse. An den Philosophen, Physiker u. Mathematiker Philipp Frank (1884-1966) in Prag: „[…] Es freut mich sehr, dass Sie mir Ihren Besuch in Aussicht stellen. Ich bin stets hier ausser am 12. und 18. Juli (Vortrag in Hamburg). Ich bin auf Ihre neue Gedanken sehr neugierig […]“


Einstein, Albert

Portraitphotographie m. e. U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), physicist, Nobel laureate; father of the Theory of Relativity. Portrait photograph with autogr. dedication signed, n. p., 1934, 25 x 20 cm. Small tear; wrinkled and brownstained at the edges. Uncommon head-to-knee portrait of Einstein, standing before a building with the housekeeper. Elsa Einstein is gaily laughing into the camera, holding a parasol. Dedication: “For Mrs. Martha, the wizard | with warm thanks | Albert Einstein | 1934.“ On the reverse, autogr. dedication signed by Elsa Einstein: “For Mrs. Martha in gratitude for many good things! Elsa Einstein”. – The picture was taken in the Spring of 1933 in front of the house of the New York lawyer Samuel Untermeyer in Palm Springs.


Einstein, Albert

E. Postkarte mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), Physiker und Nobelpreisträger. E. Postkarte mit U. [Berlin, 30. November 1915]. 1 Seite 8°. Mit e. Adresse. – An seinen Sohn Hans Albert (1904–1973): „Soeben erhielt ich Deinen Brief, über dessen lieblosen Ton ich sehr betrübt bin. Ich sehe aus Deiner langen Wartezeit und aus der Unfreundlichkeit Deines Briefes, dass Dir mein Besuch wenig Freude machen würde. Ich halte es deshalb nicht für richtig, mich dafür 2.20 Stunden in die Eisenbahn zu setzen, um damit niemand eine Freude zu machen. Erst dann werde ich Dich wieder besuchen, wenn Du mich selbst darum bittest [...] Das Weihnachtsgeschenk werde ich auf Deinen Wunsch in Geld senden. Ich finde allerdings, dass ein Luxus-Geschenk, das 70 fr kostet, unseren Verhältnissen nicht entspricht [...]“.


Einstein, Albert

E. Bildpostkarte mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), Physiker und Nobelpreisträger. E. Bildpostkarte mit U. [Zürich, 15. April 1916]. ½ Seite quer-8°. Mit e. Adresse. – An seinen Sohn „Adu“, d. i. Hans Albert (1904–1973): „Ich erwarte Dich Montag 10h im physikal. Institut [...]“. – Die Bildseite mit einer Ansicht des Vierwaldstättersees.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), Physiker und Nobelpreisträger. E. Brief mit U. O. O., 16. November 1919. 1¼ Seiten 4°. – An seine geschiedene Gattin Mileva Maric (1875–1948): „Deine Reklamation wegen der 2000 M ist vollkommen berechtigt. Ich habe das Geld irrtümlicherweise überwiesen bekommen, werde aber dafür sorgen, dass Du ein gleichwertiges Papier (oder das Geld) auf Dein Konto erhältst, nachdem dasselbe Deinem Wunsche gemäss bei der Züricher Kantonalbank untergebracht ist [...] Umso mehr muss das bis[s]chen Schweizergeld geschont werden, das doch seinen Wert in der Hauptsache behalten hat. Dazu solltet Ihr eben so bald nach Deutschland ziehen nach meiner Meinung. Sobald als möglich werde ich Schritte thun, um Euch in einer geeigneten Stadt im Badischen Wohnung zu suchen, was bei der entsetzlichen Wohnungsnot keine Kleinigkeit ist. Am sympathischsten wäre es mir, Ihr würdet die Züricher Wohnung möbliert vermieten, weil man so den fürchterliche Umzug sparen könnte. Jedenfalls aber müsste man versuchen, durch Wohnungstausch mit einer badischen Familie, die in die Schweiz will, Unterschlupf zu kriegen [...] Eine Vermeidung des Meubeltransportes wäre auch insofern sehr erwünscht, als man ja bei den heutigen unsicheren Zeiten doch nicht weiß, was der morgige Tag bringen wird [...]“.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), Physiker und Nobelpreisträger. E. Brief mit U. O. O., 1. August 1920. 1 Seite 4°. – An seinen Sohn „Tete“, d. i. Eduard (1910–1965): „Dein ausführlicher Brief mit den herzigen Bildern hat mich ausserordentlich gefreut. Es thut mir auch oft weh, dass ich Euch so wenig habe. Aber ich bin ein vielbeschäftigter Mann und kann nur wenig von hier weg. Ausserdem ist es unter den jetzigen schwierigen Verhältnissen in der Schweiz für mich zu teuer. Ich bin schon froh, wenn ich Euch dort ernähren kann. Nun freut mich aber sehr, dass wir uns am 5. Oktober in Benzingen bei Sigmaringen sehen werden. Wir wohnen dort entweder beim Pfarrer, mit dem ich gut befreundet bin[,] oder bei einer dortigen Frau, die er uns empfiehlt. Ich hoffe, dass wir mindestens 10 Tage dort beisammen bleiben können. Ich muss dann nach Holland fahren, um einen Vortrag zu halten; ich bin aber in der Zeit nicht gebunden, es muss nur alles im Oktober sein. Wir beide waren noch so wenig beisammen, dass ich Dich noch gar wenig kenne, trotzdem ich Dein Vater bin. Du hast gewiss auch nur eine ziemlich unbestimmte Vorstellung von mir. Ich will mir aber Mühe geben, dass dies anders wird. Zum Teil kommt es daher, dass Du so viel krank warst. Wir treffen uns dann in Sigmaringen [...] Es ist nett, dass Du ein guter Schüler bist; das Schönschreiben war auch bei mir eine schwache Seite. Sei in der Schule nicht ehrgeizig. Es schadet nichts, wenn andere bessere Schüler sind, als Du [...]“.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), Physiker und Nobelpreisträger. E. Brief mit U. Leiden, 5. Mai 1922. 2 Seiten 8°. – An seinen Sohn Hans Albert (1904–1973): „Vor allem entgegen meiner Gewohnheit herzliche Glückwünsche zum Geburtstag im Voraus, weil ich gerade daran denke. Ich freue mich schon sehr auf die Ferien. Was nun die Verpflegung anbelangt, will ich Anna zu bekommen suchen. Wenn sie nicht kann, müssen wir uns vielleicht selbst zu helfen suchen in Verbindung mit Wirtshaus. Das Schiff wird noch lackiert und dann geht’s los. Wie werden wir vergnügt herumkutschieren. Tröste Mama wegen Deiner Studiererei; es wird schon zur Maturität langen, und glänzend brauchts ja nicht zu sein [...] Wir können im Sommer sehr gut bei Katzenstein [d. i. Einsteins langjähriger Freund, der Chirurg Moritz Katzenstein, 1872–1932] musizieren, zu dessen Haus wir gar nicht weit zu fahren haben [...] Vielleicht finden wir aber auch da draußen ein Klavier [...]“.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), Physiker und Nobelpreisträger. E. Brief mit U. Kiel, 12. Mai 1924. 2 Seiten auf Doppelblatt. 8°. – An seine geschiedene Gattin Mileva Maric (1875–1948): „Ich bin ja immer dafür gewesen, dass Ihr ein Haus kaufen sollt. Ich kann die Sache selbst nicht so gut beurteilen und bin nie für vieles Fragen gewesen. Wenn aber Zangger [d. i. der Ordinarius und Direktor des Instituts für Gerichtliche Medizin in Zürich Heinrich Zangger, 1874–1957] die Suche befürwortet, so kauft das Haus ruhig; ich gebe hiemit meine Einwilligung [...] Meine Unfreundlichkeit im Sommer kam daher, dass ich über Deinen und Alberts Brief beleidigt war. Ich habe aber jetzt den Eindruck, dass ich insofern Unrecht hatte, als keine unfreundliche Gesinnung dahintersteckte. Von ferne nimmt sich alles anders aus, und es mischt sich leicht Galle in die harmlosesten Angelegenheiten aus Missverständnis. Ich will einmal in absehbarer Zeit nach Zürich kommen, und wir wollen alles Vergangene, soweit es schlecht ist, vergessen sein lassen. Du musst auch nicht immer so bärmeln, sondern Dich über das Schöne freuen, das Dir das Leben geschenkt hat, z. B. die prächtigen Kinder, das Haus, und dass Du – nicht mehr mit mir verheiratet bist. Anschütz [d. i. Einsteins Freund Hermann Anschütz-Kaempfe, Wissenschafter und Erfinder des Kreiselkompasses, 1872–1931] möchte einmal seine Fabrik in Alberts Hände legen Ich habe eine große Meinung von der Zukunft seines Unternehmens und glaube, dass Albert sehr befähigt dafür wäre [...]“.


Einstein, Albert

E. Postkarte mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), Physiker und Nobelpreisträger. E. Postkarte mit U. Berlin, 27. Oktober 1924. 1 Seite 8°. Mit e. Adresse. – An seinen Sohn Hans Albert (1904–1973): „[...] Ich schiffe mich also am 3. März wirklich nach Buenos Aires ein. Nach der Schweiz komme ich nun leider nicht so viel [...] Schreib dem Anschütz [d. i. Einsteins Freund Hermann Anschütz-Kaempfe, Wissenschafter und Erfinder des Kreiselkompasses, 1872–1931], dass Du (im Sommer?) in seiner Fabrik praktizieren willst – wenn Du dazu entschlossen bist. Es wird ihn freuen. Mir geht es gut. Mama habe ich bei Ehrenfest [d. i. der Physiker Paul Ehrenfest, 1880–1933, Einsteins bester Freund] entschuldigt. Hier gibt es viel Arbeit. Piccard [d. i. August Piccard, 1884-1962, Professor für Physik an der Universität Zürich und später Brüssel], der früher in Zürich war, jetzt in Brüssel[,] wird elektr. Experimente für mich machen, die mit dem erdmagnetischen Problem zusammenhängen [...]“.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), Physiker und Nobelpreisträger. E. Brief mit U. Berlin, 16. Juli 1925. 1 Seite auf Doppelblatt. 8°. Mit einem zweiseitigen e. Gedicht seines Sohnes „Teddy“, d. i. Eduard (1910–1965). – An „Mizu“, d. i. seine geschiedene Gattin Mileva Maric (1875–1948): „Wir sind recht vergnügt zusammen. Ich finde, dass Tete körperlich und geistig gut entwickelt und dass er ein guter Kamerad ist. Musiziert haben wir auch schon tüchtig. Gestern u. heute hatte ich ziemlich viel zu thun, doch waren wir schon zusammen im zoologischen Garten. Morgen wollen wir segeln. Leider muss ich am 25. abends nach Genf abreisen. Es wäre hübsch, wenn Albert ein paar Tage vorher hier sein könnte, dass wir hier noch ein paar Tage zusammen sind [...]“.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), Physiker und Nobelpreisträger. E. Brief mit U. O. O., 6. März 1926. ¾ S. 4°. – An seine geschiedene Gattin Mileva Maric (1875–1948): „Ich freute mich sehr mit Deinem ausführlichen und freundlichen Briefchen. Ich begreife auch Deine Angst wegen Albert. Wenn er keine Kinder von dem Mädchen zu erwarten hätte, würde ich nicht so energisch Stellung nehmen. Aber die Erbmasse unserer Kinder ist sowieso nicht einwandfrei. Wenn nur noch eine Belastung hinzukommt, dann ist es ein wahres Unglück. Bitte doch Albert, einmal mit Prof. Hans Meyer im Burghölzli zu sprechen. Es wäre ein Segen wenn er es thäte. Wenn ich nicht alles thäte, um dem Unglück vorzubeugen, müsste ich mir schwere Vorwürfe machen. Wenn er dann doch auf seinem Willen beharrt, nachdem man ihm alles vorgestellt hat, so trägt er eben allein die Verantwortung [...]“.


Einstein, Albert

E. Nachschrift mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), Physiker und Nobelpreisträger. E. Nachschrift (11 Zeilen) mit U. auf einem e. Brief seines Sohnes Hans Albert. Berlin, 27. Januar 1927. 1 Seite 4°. – An seine geschiedene Gattin Mileva Maric (1875–1948): „Der Adu [d. i. Hans Albert, 1904–1973) ist ein Prachtskerl [!], ein richtiger Mann geworden, der weiss was er will (leider auch thut was sie will). Ich hab ihn nicht viel geplagt, aber ihm doch meine Meinung wegen der Nachkommenschaft mit grossem Ernst gesagt. Ob es hilft, weiss ich nicht, da er sich nicht ausspricht [...]“. – Hans Albert berichtet in seinem Brief an die Mutter, daß er „am 1. Februar in Dortmund bei Aug[ust] Klönne eintrete [...] Papa hat sich sehr gefreut, dass ich die Stellung allein gefunden habe, d. h. ohne ihn [...]“. – Hans Albert Einstein war in besagter Stahlbaufirma August Klönnes als Konstrukteur und Statiker u. a. an Stahlwasserbauten – etwa für das Schiffshebewerk Niederfinow – beteiligt; durch Vermittlung seines Vaters sollte er 1931 nach Zürich zurückkehren und wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter an der 1930 eingerichteten Versuchsanstalt für Wasserbau an der ETH Zürich werden.


Einstein, Albert

E. Nachschrift mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), Physiker und Nobelpreisträger. E. Nachschrift (14 Zeilen) mit U. auf einem e. Brief seines Sohnes Eduard. O. O., 2. April 1927. 1 Seite 4°. – An seine geschiedene Gattin Mileva Maric (1875–1948): „Ich habe viel Freude mit Tete. Wir sprechen und musizieren gern und viel miteinander. Aber er frisst zu wenig und hat etwas Halswe. Hoffentlich werden wir ihn bald wieder flott haben, so daß wir ein wenig aufs Land können. Sogar zum Reger-Spielen hat mich der Kerl schon gebracht! Von Albert hatte ich nun auch wieder einen Brief, aber einen ohne irgendwas Persönliches [...]“. – Aus dem Brief Eduard Einsteins (1910–1965): „Gestern machten wir mit Bekannten eine Autofahrt nach Potsdam. Es war sehr schön. Sobald es mir ganz gut geht, werden wir in einem kleinen Ort unweit von hier auf’s Land gehen [...]“.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), Nobel laureate in physics. ALS. N. p., 12 March [probably spring 1919]. 8°. 3 pp on double leaf. In German. To his divorced wife Mileva Maric (1875–1948): “I have not yet answered your last letter but one because I am rather overwhelmed with work on various manuscripts. You must not be worried at all. For you, it is a mere formality, for me an unavoidable duty. Try to consider yourself in my place. Elsa [Einstein’s cousin and since June 1919 his second wife, formerly Elsa Löwenthal (divorced), 1876–1936] has two daughters, of which the elder is 18, that is to say, of age. This child, already greatly handicapped by the loss of an eye, suffers under the rumors concerning my relationship to her mother. I regret this and wish to remedy it by a formal marriage. For you, too, this formal change of circumstances would mean an improvement, as your legal rights would thus be laid down clearly. I am prepared to do even more than I once agreed to: 1) 5600 Marks annually for your personal allowance. 2) Payment of my Prague funds as well as of 6000 Marks of savings accumulated here into an account agreed upon by the both of us for the benefit of our children. 3) Payment of at least 3000 Marks annually to create the planned reserve fund. By thus reducing myself to a state of semi-poverty I prove to you that the well-being of my boys is my principal concern before everything else in the world. Also as a person I shall always be there for them first and foremost. Our divorce has nothing to do with my relationship to the boys. This is an exceedingly strange view of yours. However, I would like to stipulate one condition, one which no one can think unjustified. When peace has returned, I want to have the right to see my children not only on journeys, but also have them in my household during the short time I am granted with them; they would be alone with me and would not be subjected to the influence of strangers. For I have come to appreciate the conditions of living alone, which have revealed themselves to me as an indescribable blessing, and I shall never again give them up. I have forgotten something. 4) In the case of my decease you will be entitled to the pension in such a form that you would even receive it from Else’s estate in the case of her decease. And finally 5) The new marriage will have a full separation of property, so it cannot mean any financial harm to you. You can therefore be content and look to the future with calmness. After you have let me know you decision, I will transfer the matter to a servant of justice, who will take care that all is done correctly [...]”. – Insignificant tear to fol. 1.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), Physiker und Nobelpreisträger. E. Brief mit U. O. O., 29. Juni o. J. 1 Seite 8°. – An seine geschiedene Gattin Mileva Maric (1875–1948): „Ich komme am 9. Juli zu Euch mit einem Zug, der hier am 8. Juli abends abgeht. Am 10. werde ich wahrscheinlich nach Genf weiterfahren müssen. Es ist allerdings möglich, dass ich von 14.–19. Juli frei habe. Aber dies ist nicht einmal sicher. In dieser Zeit werde ich zu Euch nicht reisen können. Wenn Ihr ans Meer geht (nach Frankreich), so könntet Ihr vielleicht am 1. August wieder zurück sein. Dann gehe ich mit Tete [d. i. Einsteins Sohn Eduard, 1910–1965] wohl nach Chamonix. Das liegt günstig, und es sind dort einige Männer, mit denen ich einiges zu besprechen habe [...]“. – Die Verso-Seite mit einigen, wohl a. d. Hand Milevas stammenden Berechnungen.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), Physiker und Nobelpreisträger. E. Brief mit U. O. O. u. D. „Samstag“. 1 Seite 4°. – An seine geschiedene Gattin Mileva Maric (1875–1948): „Ich werde Eurem Wunsch, der mich sehr freut, dadurch nachkommen, dass ich mich auf der Rückreise, d. h. auf der Reise zwischen Bologna und Leiden in Zürich aufhalte. Ich würde am liebsten in Eurem Haus wohnen, wie ich es in Aussicht genommen hatte. Aber ich kann es nicht thun wegen des öffentlichen Skandals, der damit verbunden wäre. Ich bin schon ohnedies zu viel im Mittelpunkt des Geredes. Ich kann ja in der Pension neben Euch wohnen. Wir können dann über alles reden. Hauptfrage: Wo soll Albert [d. i. Einsteins Sohn Hans Albert, 1904–1973] studieren? Ich bin nicht mehr so unbedingt dafür, dass Ihr nach Deutschland ziehet. Es hat seine zwei Seiten. Ich reise Samstag 15. [m]orgens ab und komme nachts um halb zwei nach Innsbruck. Dort übernachte ich in der ‚goldenen Sonne’. Am besten wäre es, ich würde Albert dort finden. Wenn er aber nicht da ist, warte ich dort Sonntag auf ihn. Wir reisen dann wahrscheinlich direkt nach Florenz ev. mit Aufenthalt in Verona. In Florenz ist Maja [d. i. Einsteins Schwester Maria Winteler-Einstein, 1881–1951]. Sie wird sich sicher sehr freuen, Albert nach so langer Zeit wiederzusehen. Abends am 20. spätestens muss ich in Bologna sein. Am 26. habe ich dort meinen letzten Vortrag [...]“.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U. [Bleistift]
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), Physiker und Nobelpreisträger. E. Brief (in Bleistift) mit U. O. O. u. D. [Zürich, 1909 bis 1911], 1 Seite quer-kl.-8°. – Wie e. auf der Verso-Seite vermerkt an Prof. Dr. B in Karlsruhe: „Um 11 Uhr von einem Spaziergang heimgekehrt finde ich Ihre Karte vor. Nun suchte ich Sie im Institut und in Ihrer Wohnung. Da ich Sie nicht finden konnte, bleibt nichts anderes übrig, als dass ich in meiner Wohnung (Moussonstr. 12) warte, ob Sie mir nicht vielleicht eine zweite Mitteilung zugehen lassen. Es ist Telephon im Haus (Notar Güller), das benutzt werden kann [...]“. – Einstein war von 22. Oktober 1909 bis 30. März 1911 unter der erwähnten Adresse (heute Nr. 10) gemeldet. – Am unteren Rand gelocht (keine Textberührung).


Einstein, Albert

Portraitphotographie m. e. U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), Nobel laureate in physics. Half-length portrait photograph with autogr. dedication signed. N. p., 1845. 257 x 202 mm. – For Dr. Haussner. Caption on the reverse by a different hand: “Dr. Albert Einstein. Princeton. Feb. 1945. Photo by Alan W. Richards. Palmer Lab. Princeton NJ”.


Einstein, Albert

Brief m. e. U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. Brief m. e. U., Princeton, 22. Januar 1954, 2/3 Seite 4°. Blindgeprägter Briefkopf. Gefaltet. Mit Briefumschlag. An Hanne Walz in Hannover, die ihn zu dem wohl berühmtesten Bild Einsteins mit ausgestreckter Zunge (Fotografie: Arthur Sasse) befragt hatte: „[…] Ihr Brief […] hat mich besonders gefreut nicht nur wegen des munteren Stiles, sondern auch weil er einen sehr zutreffenden Gedanken äussert. Mein Verdienst an dem Bild ist allerdings insofern gering als es an jenem Tage nicht an die Haupthandlung sondern nur eine unbeachtete Nebenszene angeschlossen war. Ihr Vorschlag dürfte darum in den beteiligten Zirkeln keine begeisterte Aufnahme finden, weil da meist kein moralisches Gewicht übrig bliebe, wenn man den tierischen Ernst wegnähme. […]“ Beiliegt: Kopie des Gegenbriefes. – Das „Zungenbild“ entstand am Rande seines 72. Geburtstags, am 14. März 1951 in Princeton. Man hatte eine Feier für ihn ausgerichtet. Einstein wurde an diesem Ehrentag immer wieder von Fotografen bedrängt - schließlich war Einstein ein Medienstar. Die Journalisten wollten hören, was der große Physiker und Nobelpreisträger zur Weltpolitik zu sagen hätte. Doch Einstein war der ganze Medienrummel zuwider. Beim Verlassen der Feier nach dem Lunch konnte er den Kameras aber nicht mehr entgehen. Er sollte sogar in Geburtstagspose in die Kamera lächeln. Schon hatte er im Fond der Limousine des ehemaligen Chefs am Institute of Advanced Studies Platz genommen. Links von ihm warteten Frank Aydelotte, rechts dessen Ehefrau Marie. Immer wieder sagte Einstein: „Es ist genug, es ist genug“, aber die Paparazzi gaben keine Ruhe. Sich der Konsequenzen durchaus bewusst, streckte er mit seinem schalkhaften Lachen dem verblüfften Fotografen Arthur Sasse die Zunge heraus. Der drückte auf den Auslöser und so entstand das Foto, das um die Welt gehen würde.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Brief m. U. „Albert”, o. O., 8. April 1926, 2/3 Seite 4°. An seine erste Frau Mileva Einstein-Maric (1875-1948): „[…] Ich sende Dir hier einen Brief von Zangger, in dem von einer Hypothek auf das Haus die Rede ist. Aber genauer werde ich nicht klug daraus, hauptsächlich, weil ich den Brief nicht entziffern kann. Schreib mir dann wieder, was lost ist, damit ich Euch raten kann. Ich bin besorgt wegen Albert, da ich gar nicht mehr höre. Er scheint blind in das Verderben zu laufen, ohne dass wir was thun können. Ich schreibe Zangger, auch wegen Albert. Im Juli komme ich, um mit Tete die Ferien zuzubringen. Erkundigt Euch nach einem Ort in beträchtlicher Höhe, mindestens 1500 m, wo nicht ein geschwollener Fremdenverkehr ist. Ich muss ein paar Tage wieder nach Genf, wohin ich aber Tete mitnehmen könnte. Wann beginnen und endigen Tetes Ferien? Ich möchte möglichst lange mit ihm sein. Ich freue mich sehr darauf […] Übermorgen Abend bin ich mit der Mutter Deiner Freundin bei Moszkowskis zusammen […]“ – 1930 erkrankte Eduard „Tete“ an Schizophrenie. – Einstein macht sich Sorgen um die Beziehung seines Sohnes Hans Albert mit seiner späteren Frau (Hochzeit 1927) Frieda Knecht, die er lange Zeit abgelehnt hatte.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Brief m. U. „A. E.”, o. O. [Zürich], 8. April o. J., 3 ½ Seiten gr.-8°. Doppelblatt. Kleiner Einriss am Mittelfalz. Hotelbriefkopf. An seine erste Frau Mileva Einstein-Maric (1875-1948) kurz nach Ihrer Trennung; vorwiegend über Scheidungsfragen: „[…] meine Hochachtung wegen des guten Zustandes unserer Buben. Sie sind körperlich und seelisch in bester Verfassung, wie ich mirs nicht besser wünschen könnte. Und ich weiss, dass dies grösstenteils Deiner richtigen Erziehung zu verdanken ist. Ebenso bin ich Dir dankbar dafür, dass Du mir die Kinder nicht entfremdet hast. Sie kamen mir frei und nett entgegen. Ich freue mich sehr, einige Tage mit Albert allein verbringen zu können. Eine Besprechung zwischen uns hätte keinen Zweck und könnte nur geeignet sein, alte Wunden wieder aufzureissen. […] Eine Scheidung zwischen uns kann – soviel mir bekannt ist – nur auf Grund einer von Dir ausgehenden Klage erfolgen. Denn da ich als der schuldige Teil figurieren muss, und ich mich selber nicht verklagen kann, scheint die erste Frage: Bist Du prinzipiell geneigt, eine Scheidungsklage gegen mich einzureichen? Wenn nein, so entfallen die folgenden Fragen. Es scheint mir, dass Du dabei nichts riskierst. Denn Du kannst ja selbst die Bedingungen angeben, unten denen Du mit einer Scheidung einverstanden wärest. Wenn Du prinzipiell geneigt bist, eine Klage einzureichen, nach dem wir uns über die Bedingungen verständigt haben, entsteht die Frage, ob die Verhandlungen hier oder in Berlin stattzufinden haben. Soviel ich weiss, ist es unsicher, ob dies hier sein kann. In Berlin ist es sicher möglich, und weniger langwierig. […] Alles wird offen und ehrlich gemacht werden. Ich erwarte also Antwort auf folgende Fragen. 1) Bist du bereit, falls wir uns über die Bedingungen einigen, die Klage einzureichen? 2) Welchen sind im Ja-Falle etwa Deine Bedingungen 3) Bist Du im Falle des Einverständnisses bezüglich 1) und 2) bereit, mit der Ausführung der Formalitäten den schon avisierten Berliner Anwalt zu betrauen.


Einstein, Albert

E. Postkarte mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Postkarte m. U. „Euer Papa”, Berlin, o. D., 1 Seite 8°. An seinen ersten Sohn Hans Albert „Mein lieber Albert“: „[…] Es ist so schwer, über die Grenze zu kommen, dass mehrere hiesige Bekannte wieder zurück mussten, ohne in die Schweiz reisen zu können. Deshalb kann ich jetzt nicht zu Dir kommen. Ostern aber besuche ich Dich wieder, ich werde dann solange an der Grenze warten bis ich hinüber darf […]“


Einstein, Albert

E. Postkarte mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Postkarte m. U. „Papa”, Berlin, 15. November 1915, 1 Seite 8°. An seinen ersten Sohn Hans Albert „Mein lieber Albert“: „[…] Ich will um Neujahr in die Schweiz kommen, um mit Dir ein paar Tage zuzubringen. Prof. Zangger hat Dir gewiss schon den Vorschlag gemacht. Wohin möchtest Du am liebsten mit mir? Natürlich nicht weit von Zürich weg. Prof. Zangger meinte, mir sollten zu Herrn Besso. Ich weiss aber nicht, ob Du das gern hast […]“


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Brief m. U. „Albert”, o. O. u. D., 2 Seiten gr.-8°. An seine erste Frau Mileva Einstein-Maric (1875-1948) nach Ihrer Trennung: „[…] ich […] bin auch sachlich mit dem Inhalte sehr einverstanden. Tete schreibt wirklich geistvoll, aber es ist gefährlich für ihn, wenn man ihm ‚den Hof macht’. Erstens nämlich ist es verderblich für ihn, wenn sein Ehrgeiz angestachelt wird. Er könnte die Beschaulichkeit verlieren, ohne die eine tiefere Entwicklung unmöglich ist. Sodann wird er leicht selbstzufrieden, verliert die Kritik gegen sich selbst und wird später verbittert, wenn er in der grossen Aussenwelt nicht die Resonanz findet. Mann mus ihm einprägen, dass er auf einen normalen Beruf hinarbeiten muss, der ihm eine gewisse Sicherheit der sozialen Position gibt, die ihm [sein] inneres Gleichgewicht sichert. Die schöpferische Beschäftigung mit literarischen Dingen ist als Hauptberuf ein Unding wie etwa ein Tier, das nur Lilien frisst. Du kannst ihm sehr viel Gutes erweisen, wenn Du ihm dies oft und eindringlich sagst. Es wäre doch gut, wenn Du mir ihn schicktest […] Albert thut mir leid. Er schrieb mir neulich einen unverschämten Brief unter dem Einfluss der weiblichen Macht. Er kann sich nur so innerlich retten, dass er mich von sich selbst in jeder Weise herabsetzt; das thut er auch. Durch seine Sache muss er durch, zu retten ist da nichts mehr. Es thut mir leid, dass Du auch sonst so viel Sorgen hast: die alte Mutter mit der hoffnungslos kranken Tochter. […] Ich hatte auch das ewige Nasenbluten wie Tete. Ich fürchte, es hängt mit der Jugend-Tuberkulose zusammen […]“


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Brief m. U. „von Deinem gestrengen Vater”, Berlin, 27. März o. J., 2/3 Seite 4°. Auf gedrucktem Briefpapier. Kleinere Randläsuren. An seinen zweiten Sohn Eduard „Tete“: „[…] Dein Brief erscheint mir nicht nur verständig, wondern ich ertappe mich darauf, schon oft Ae[h]nliches gefühlsmässig im Busen genährt zu haben. Aber bisher war doch der Schwerpunkt Deiner Auffassung die Lehre von der Negierung der gegenseitigen Hilfe und Förderung der Menschen. Wenn Du Dich gegen die Überschätzung des Geistigen wendest, so gebe ich Dir völlig recht. Ach hier haben die Griechen vorbildlich das richtige Mass gefunden. Ich habe an Deiner Schreiberei viel Vergnügen. Wir wollen uns darüber unterhalten, auch über das Frauenstimmrecht. Dafür kämpfen unter den Weibern eigentlich nur solche mit männlichem Einschlag […]“


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Brief m. U. „Euer Papa”, o. O. [Berlin], 23. März 1929, 1 Seite 8°. Auf der Rückseite seine faksimilierte Danksagungskarte zum 50. Geburtstag. An seine Kinder Hans Albert und Eduard: „[…] Hier mein Geburtstag-Gedicht. Wir erwarten Euch also in dieser Woche. Schreibt, sobald als möglich, den Tag Eurer Ankunft. Tetel kommt auch zu meiner grossen Freude. Ein Häuschen haben wir aber nicht bekommen, sondern den Platz für ein solches […]“


Einstein, Albert

E. Postkarte mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Postkarte m. U. „Euer Papa”, Zürich, 14. März 1930, 1 Seite 8°. An seinen Sohn Hans Albert: „[…] Wir haben hier 6 schöne Tage zusammen verbracht, die ich bei Gelegenheit des Zionistenkongresses hier zubrachte. Tetel […] geht im Herbst zu meiner Schwester nach Florenz. Grossmann traf ich in desolatem Zustand. Heut Abend geht’s wieder nach Berlin oder vielmehr nach Kaputh bei Potsdam, wo ich Euch das nächste Mal in eigenem Häuschen zu empfangen hoffe. Es ist in etwa einem Monat fertig. Da wartet auch ein stolzes Segelschiff, das mir geschenkt wurde. Mein Problem macht schöne Fortschritte […]“ – Auf der gleichen Karte mit Grüßen von Ilsa Einstein.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Brief m. U. „Dein Papa”, o. O., 13. November 1930, 2/3 Seite 4°. Faltspuren. An seinen Sohn Hans Albert: „[…] Anbei die Abschrift eines Briefes Deines ehemaligen Lehrers. Mama riet, an ihn zu schreiben, was ich that; berichte ihr sofort, da sie natürlich sehr interessiert ist […] Ich glaube, das es eine gute Sache wäre, aber die Entscheidung liegt bei Dir. Ich würde an Deiner Stelle lieber mündlich die Hauptverhandlung mit ihm führen, da das Geschriebene starr ist und leicht zum Bruch führt. Es handelt sich um eine Stellung als Ingenieur am eidgen[össischen]. wasserbautechnischen Institut in Zürich […]“ – Beiliegt: e. Briefentwurf (Bewerbungsschreiben) von Hans Albert Einstein an den Professor, 2 Seiten quer—gr.-8°. Eng beschrieben.


Einstein, Albert

E. Postkarte mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Postkarte m. U. „Albert bezw. Papa”, Leiden, 29. November 1931 1 ¼ Seiten 8°. An seine erste Frau Mileva Einstein-Maric (1875-1948) nach Ihrer Trennung: „[…] Ich habe den Brief sogleich besorgt. Man kann der Firma den schlechten Einkauf nicht ankreiden, da die Weltkrise in ihren Folgen nicht vorauszubestimmen war. Ich glaube, dass die Werte sich wieder erholen werden. Den Radioapparat will ich Euch gern geben. Ich habe keinen und die Schickerei ist heutzutage nicht vorteilhaft. Kauft Euch einen Apparat mit Netz-Anschluss (ohne Akumulator) und schicket die Rechnung an Prof. Ehrenfest, Witte Rogen Str. Leiden. Dieser schickt dann das Geld direkt der Firma. Albert soll Euch beim Auswählen helfen, weil er es gut versteht. Dies ist gewissermassen ein Ersatz für die unterbliebene Reise mit Tetel […]“


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Brief m. U. „Dein Albert”, o. O., 17. November 1931, 2/3 Seite 4°. An seine erste Frau Mileva Einstein-Maric (1875-1948) nach Ihrer Trennung: „[…] Nun kann ich leider doch nicht zu Euch kommen, da ich nach Amerika abreisen muss nächste Woche, und zwar wieder nach Pasadena (Instit. Of Technologie). Ich bleibe dort Januar und Februar. Ich würde gerne Tetel mitnehmen; ich glaube aber sicher, dass es für ihn besser ist, wenn er in seiner regelmässigen Thätigkeit ist. Hoffentlich lebe ich noch, wenn er mit dem Studium fertig ist; dann könnte es besser nachgeholt werden. Tetel entwickelt sich sehr gut. Ich hoffe, dass sich bei ihm bald der Ehrgeiz in Freude am Schaffen umsetzt. Dann wird er wirklich ein ganzer Kerl […]“


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Brief m. U. „Dein Papa”, Caputh, 6. Oktober 1932, 1 Seite gr.-4°. Eng beschrieben. An seinen Sohn Hans Albert: „[…] Du musst es begreifen, dass mein Vertrauen sich allmählich erschöpft hat und dass ich keine Lust habe, nach Zürich zu fahren, worum sie mich gebeten hat. An Tetel kann ich nicht wegen seines Zustandes auch nicht mehr wenden. Thue nun Du nach Rücksprache mit Deiner Mutter und wenn möglich mit Tetel, was Du für richtig hältst. Ich warte ab und werde mein künftiges Verhalten danach ausrichten. Tetels Zustand halte ich für ernst. Du weißt ja selbst, welche Gefahren Deiner Mutter Descendenz mit sich bringt. Ich habe Dir alles ohne Erfolg wiederholt dargelegt, als es für die Verhütung künftigen Unheils noch Zeit war. Nun heisst es Tragen, was nicht mehr zu ändern ist. Es thut mir leid, dass ich Dich mit alledem belasten muss; aber es geht nicht anders, weil Klarheit unbedingt für mit nötig ist, damit ich mich richtig verhalten kann. […]“


Einstein, Albert

E. Postkarte
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Postkarte, Berlin, 26. Oktober 1925, 1 ½ Seiten 8°. An seinen Sohn Eduard „Lieber Tete“: „[…] Neulich sandte ich dem alten Banquier Fürstenberg, der viele glänzende Witze gemacht hat ein Glückwunschschreiben zu seinem 75. Geburtstag. Ich sende Dir eine Abschrift damit Du siehst, dass Dein alter Herr auch was für die holde Muse übrig hat. Glück wünsch’ ich dem Finanz-Magnaten | Dess Leben voller Ruhmesthaten | S’gab viel gewalt’ge Geldesleute | Ob stark am Ende oder pleite | So sehr ihr mächt’ger Name glänzt’ | Die Pracht war zeitlich sehr begrenzt. | Doch Fürstenberg im Gegenteil | Ward die Unsterblichkeit zuteil, | Erreicht’ sie nicht durch vieles Sitzen | Und über tief Problemen schwitzen | Viel lose Witze liess er fliegen | Dass man vor Lachen sich muss biegen | Herrn Fürstenberg thu ich verschreiben | So lang als sie mobil zu bleiben. […] Dies Schreiben kommt wohl etwas spät | Die Kuh nur Milch gibt, wenn sie hat. […]“