Albert Einstein

German-born theoretical physicist, 1879-1955

"Einstein developed the general theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics (alongside quantum mechanics). Einstein's work is also known for its influence on the philosophy of science. Einstein is best known in popular culture for his mass–energy equivalence formula E = mc2 (which has been dubbed ""the world's most famous equation""). He received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics for his ""services to theoretical physics"", in particular his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect, a pivotal step in the evolution of quantum theory. His intellectual achievements and originality have made the word ""Einstein"" synonymous with ""genius""."

Source: Wikipedia

Einstein, Albert

Physiker und Nobelpreisträger (1879-1955). Autograph quotation signed. O. O. 1 S. Qu.-8vo.
$ 26,960 / 25.000 € (95562/BN63158)

"Es ist charakteristisch für den Europäer dass er lieber für schlecht als für dumm gehalten sein will" ("It is characteristic of Europeans that they would rather be thought evil than stupid").

buy now

Einstein, Albert

Physiker und Nobelpreisträger (1879-1955). Typed letter signed. Pasadena. 1 S. 4to.
$ 17,254 / 16.000 € (95563/BN63159)

Addressed to Mark Carter, Chairman of the ORT Organization, Los Angeles. The present letter was written in the course of Albert Einstein's second visit to the United States, while he was spending time at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), Pasadena, where he met with physicists and astronomers to discuss topics related to his theory of relativity. At that time, Einstein was invited by Mark Carter, Chairman of ORT, Los Angeles, to attend a benefit event featuring a performance by actors belonging to the Habima Theatre.

Einstein was a great admirer of Habima. Einstein wrote: "The efforts of ORT for the rehabilitation of Eastern European Jewry are of the highest importance for the Jewish people as a whole. A disease is definitely being healed here, which has brought distress to our people for centuries. I personally attended an unforgettable performance of ‘The Dybbuk' at the Habima Theatre and I am convinced that the high level of this play will be enthusiastically received locally as well" (transl. from the German original). - The organization known as ORT ("Organization for Rehabilitation through Training") was established in Tsarist Russia in 1880 by Jewish philanthropists with the goal of providing professional training for members of struggling Jewish communities in Eastern Europe. The organization established a network of schools in the Pale of Settlement and in Russia, which, following the First World War, expanded to the West and opened branches throughout the world. In late October, 1930, the British branch of ORT held a luncheon attended by academics, philanthropists, and rabbis. In attendance were George Bernard Shaw, H.G. Wells, Lord Lionel Walter Rothschild, and Chief Rabbi of the United Kingdom Joseph Herman (Zvi) Hertz. These figures were joined by Albert Einstein, who took the opportunity to express his great regard for the ORT organization in a speech he delivered at the event. - Typed on the official stationery of the California Institute of Technology. Stains. Fold lines. Minor creases. Remnants of glued paper on verso..

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German-born physicist, humanitarian and Nobel Prize winner; promulgator of the General Theory of Relativity (1879-1955). Autograph Letter Signed ("A. Einstein"), in German. [Berlin]. 4to. 1 page.
$ 32,352 / 30.000 € (60686)

Einstein on the value of relativity for philosophy. Einstein writes to Hans Reichenbach, the philosopher of science and an influential expositor of Relativity. In part (translation): "I am really very pleased that you want to dedicate your excellent brochure to me, but even more so that you give me such high marks as a lecturer and thinker. The value of the th.[eory] of rel.[ativity] for philosophy seems to me to be that it exposed the dubiousness of certain concepts that even in philosophy were recognized as small change.

Concepts are simply empty when they stop being firmly linked to experiences. They resemble upstarts who are ashamed of their origins and want to disown them." The letter was published in the Collected Papers of Albert Einstein, vol 10, doc 66, pp 323-324 (CPAE Translation, vol 10, doc 66, p 201). Slightly uneven toning, a few spots in upper margin, two-hole punch at left margin, folding creases..

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German-born physicist, humanitarian and Nobel Prize winner; promulgator of the General Theory of Relativity (1879-1955). Typed Letter Signed ("A. Einstein") with Autograph Postscript, in German Berlin. 4to. 2 pp. Punch holes. On his personal letterhead.
$ 37,744 / 35.000 € (60688)

Einstein writes to Reichenbach (1891-1953), a colleague and important expositor of Relativity, to suggest to him a clearer way of explaining one aspect of his theory. He opens the letter by saying (in translation): "I think the logical presentation that you give of my theory is indeed possible, but it's not the simplest one." After providing a list of four possibilities for "increasing specialization regarding the distant comparison of vectors" he comments: "Of course one can also start with an affine connection and specialize either by introducing a metric or by introducing integrability conditions; i.e.

do it the way you did. But this is less simple, less natural." He goes on to assert that "[t]he naturalness of the field of structure envisaged by me seems indisputable to me. I will only know in a few months whether this construction contains deeper traits of reality; for the problems needed to be solved to make this decision are not at all easy." The letter ends with a postscript in Einstein's hand, inviting Reichenbach and his wife to tea, noting "Schrödinger is supposed to come as well.".

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German-born theoretical physicist who developed the theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics (alongside quantum mechanics (1879-1955). Archive of 4 Typed Letters Signed, „A. Einstein“. Princeton. 4to. Each 1/2 page. Personal stationery, onionskin paper; earliest letter mounted at corners to larger sheet and sides trimmed (not affecting text), folds (few with minor loss to signature), most with minor chipping at edges, faint scattered soiling.
$ 26,960 / 25.000 € (78181)

To inventor John Anthony Gillmeier, in German, mostly concerning his invention of a machine to therapeutically stimulate muscles using electric current, and declining his invitation to join an organization [New York Academy of Sciences, of which Gillmeier was a member?]. 22 October 1947: "[…] You seem to overestimate the possibilities of my work, as do many others. Under the present circumstances, I can do nothing but state my opinion from time to time when the opportunity arises, and not too often, so as not to compromise […] [the] effect.

[…]“ 
11 September 1951: "I have read your letter […] and have looked at your drawings, but I cannot judge them either in a positive or a negative sense. The fact that currents can act on muscles is well known. However, whether you can achieve a health-promoting effect in the way you have suggested, I have no judgment. […]" 

Einstein received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics "for his services to theoretical physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect", a pivotal step in the development of quantum theory..

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German-born physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Typed letter signed (‘A. Einstein‘) to Hugo Bergmann Princeton. 4to. One page, 279 x 216mm. Blind embossed letterhead.
$ 10,245 / 9.500 € (78396)

In German. ‘The controversy about the foundations of the physics of probability’. Einstein is sending in a separate packet the volume printed for his 70th birthday (Albert Einstein: Philosopher-Scientist). ‘I am sending it to you as I think that the controversy about the foundations of the physics of probability will perhaps interest you’. Once Bergmann has finished with the book, Einstein asks him to pass it to Rosa Dukas, sister of Einstein’s assistant, Helen. Einstein has been discussing the problems of the Hebrew University with the recently-elected president, Selig Brodetzky, who has visited.

Selig Brodetzky (1888-1954) was second president of the Hebrew University during a turbulent period, marked by the forced abandonment of the campus on Mount Scopus and disputes with the University Senate..

buy now

Einstein, Albert

deutsch-schweizerisch-amerikanischer Physiker (1879-1955). Eigenh. Brief mit Unterschrift. ohne Ort. 4to. 1 p.
$ 37,744 / 35.000 € (78416)

An den Wissenschaftler Dr. Gabriel Segall: „[…] Sie haben mir mitgeteilt, dass Sie hier in Süd-Kalifornien eine Organisation für das ,arbeitende Palästina’ ins Leben gerufen haben. Ich wünsche Ihnen von Herzen Glück und Erfolg zu dieser Thätigkeit. Das ,arbeitende Palästina’ repräsentiert zweifellos in erster Linie den den sozialen Fortschritt und die soziale Gerechtigkeit in Palästina und damit jene Ideen, welche nach meiner Überzeugung den idealen Wert des Aufbau-Werkes in erster Linie ausmachen. Diese Gemeinschaft ist es auch, von deren Wirken die so wichtige Erzielung einer befriedigenden Übereinkunft mit dem arabischen Volke abhängt […]“

buy now

Einstein, Albert

deutsch-schweizerisch-amerikanischer Physiker (1879-1955). Typed letter signed. Princeton, New Jersey. 4to. 1 p. Blindgepr. Briefkopf.
$ 26,960 / 25.000 € (78418)

Letter to French mathematician Jacques Hadamard, related to his efforts as a pacifist activist. In part (translated): "I am sorry that I cannot authorize the publication of my private letter addressed to you…This political propaganda and counter-propaganda, which in fact cannot be based on any verified facts, is only suitable to create hatred and hostility. You are also aware that an objective investigation of the case, suggested by the International Red Cross, which was to be carried out by the Red Cross of neutral countries, has been rejected by the North Korean side.

I believe that transnationally minded intellectuals can only serve the good cause effectively by advocating negotiation, understanding and transnational solution of the security problem, but not by engaging in such propaganda ventures as the present one. I find that the Quacker organization [sic!] and the Indian government have served the supranational interests best so far. I think that one should first and foremost stick to the old medical motto: 'Non nocere.'" In fine condition, with some chipping along the edges. Hadamard published an open letter to Einstein in March 1952, accusing the Americans of developing biological weapons for use during the Korean War. Einstein responded privately on March 26, 1952, writing in a letter that has since been published: 'I am really the last person who would excuse these abominable weapons, whether they are atomic bombs or biological means of destruction.' Einstein went on to urge constructive supranational security action. Hadamard evidently asked to publish the letter, which Einstein here declines. A fascinating piece of correspondence between leading intellectuals on the topic of international peace..

buy now

Einstein, Albert

deutsch-schweizerisch-amerikanischer Physiker (1879-1955). Ms. Brief mit eigenh. Unterschrift. Princeton. 4to. 1 p. Gedr. Briefkopf „Prof. Albert Einstein | 112 Mercer Street | Princeton, New Jersey | U.S.A.“. Lochung, alt ausgebessert.
$ 13,480 / 12.500 € (78464)

An William Roth: „For many years I have been increasingly interested in the work of the American Committee for Emigre Scholars, Writers and Artistes. This Committe has welcomed and counselled most of the European professionals of all creeds who have had the privilege of coming to America to escape totalitarian oppression. I know only too well how important it is for an emigre professional to receive this kind of help. The American Committee provides a place where such a newcomer finds advisers who understand his problems and can interpret to him the way of life and institutions of America, while he is being assisted in finding work in the field of his abilities.

This is infinitely more difficult for specialized professionals than for workers in industry and the trades. The services of the American Committee are now needed more than ever before. Many of the professionals who arrived here during the last few years under the Displaced persons Act first gladly accepted low-level jobs if no others were available. They hoped that within a reasonable time they would get a start in their own fields. Unfortunately, all too many are still in their first low level jobs and have become increasingly hopeless. Additional professionals will soon arrive among the 214000 immigrants authorized by the Act recently passed by Congress with the strong support of President Eisenhower. Both the newcomers and those among the earlier arrivals not yet placed have to depend on the American Committee lest their skills are to be lost for our country. I therefore feel strongly that the American Committee should be given the continuing support of understanding American citizens and institutions […] May I express the personal hope that you will be able to contribute to the success of this important endeavor? […]“.

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Vintage signed "A. Einstein, 52." and dated matte-finish photograph of Einstein. no place [Princeton]. 3.5 x 4 inch.
$ 9,166 / 8.500 € (80084)

The photograph shows Einstein seated at his desk in Princeton with book-lined shelves in the background, signed in the lower border in fountain pen, "A. Einstein, 52." In fine condition, with old adhesive residue on the reverse. A superb, intellectual pose of one of the 20th century's greatest thinkers.

buy now

Einstein, Albert

Deutscher Physiker und Nobelpreisträger (1879-1955). Photograph signed and inscribed to the photographer ("To Mr Tycko/ Albert Einstein. 1932"). O. O. Photographie: 238 : 188mm. Gesamtgröße: 380 : 300mm. Platinum-Abzug.
$ 59,312 / 55.000 € (80732)

Beautiful photograph showing Einstein head-and-shoulders facing up to his right, the image signed in black ink by the photographer ("Tycko LA"), and on the original studio mount marked 'Study by Tycko/ The Ambassador', A FAMOUS IMAGE, INSCRIBED BY EINSTEIN TO THE PHOTOGRAPHER. Aaron Tycko had his studio at the Ambassador Hotel, Los Angeles, and Einstein greatly admired the photographs taken of him at this sitting, telling Tycko on 2 March 1932 that he finds in them 'a truly artistic treatment of the light effect through which photography approximates the art of painting': 'Man findet auf ihnen eine wahrhaft kuenstlerische Behandlung der Lichteffekte, durch welche die Photographie der Malerei nahezukommen vermag'. The present owner's step-father was given this photograph by Tycko himself, a friend and fellow admirer of Einstein, in exchange for a painting..

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Magnificent vintage signed and dated matte-finish photograph. no place. 200 : 250 mm (8 x 10 inch).
$ 26,960 / 25.000 € (81234)

A pleasant bust-length pose, signed neatly in the lower border in fountain pen, "Albert Einstein, 1931." Reverse bears a credit stamp attributed to The New York Times Studio. In fine condition, with small creases to the lower left corner tip, and silvering to some of the darker areas of the image. A decidedly scarce soft-focus portrait of Einstein. Becoming rare in that format.

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). "Wesen der Relativitätstheorie". Autograph manuscript. No place, [1947-1948]. Small folio. 5½ pp. On paper watermarked "Whiting Mutual Bond – Rag Content".  .
$ 377,440 / 350.000 € (81763)

German-language draft for "The Essence of the Theory of Relativity", an article published in English within volume XVI of "The American Peoples Encyclopedia" (1948). After a general introduction, the "special theory of relativity" and the "general theory of relativity" are discussed, with a few equations and a small graph sketch. – "Die Mathematik hat es ausschliesslich zu thun mit der Beziehung von Begriffen zu einander ohne Rücksicht auf die Beziehung zu Erfahrungs-Gegenständen. Die Physik hat es zwar auch mit mathematischen Begriffen zu thun; diese Begriffe erlangen aber physikalischen Inhalt nur dadurch, dass ihre Beziehung zu Erfahrungs-Gegenständen in klarer Weise festgelegt wird.

So verhält es sich im Besonderen auch mit den Begriffen Bewegung, Raum, Zeit. Die Relativitätstheorie ist jene physikalische Theorie, die auf einer konsequenten physikalischen Interpretation dieser drei Begriffe beruht. Der Name ‘Relativitätstheorie’ hängt damit zusammen, dass Bewegung vom Standpunkt der Erfahrbarkeit stets als relative Bewegung eines Dinges gegen andere (z. B. eines Wagens gegenüber dem Erdboden, oder der Erde gegenüber der Sonne und den Fixsternen) auftritt (Bewegung ist aber nicht wahrnehmbar als ‘Bewegung gegen den Raum’ oder – wie man es auch ausgedrückt hat – als ‘absolute Bewegung’). Das ‘Relativitätsprinzip’ im weitesten Sinne ist in der Aussage enthalten: Die Gesamtheit der physikalischen Phänomene ist so beschaffen, dass sie für die Aufstellung des Begriffes ‘absolute Bewegung’ keinen Anhalt bietet, oder kürzer aber weniger präzis: Es gibt keine absolute Bewegung [...]". – Traces of a paperclip with a slight rustmark to the first leaf..

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Beautiful signed photograph. no place. 11" x 15" (sight).
$ 37,744 / 35.000 € (83489)

Black and white headshot of Albert Einstein taken by photographer Aaron Tycko while Einstein was touring the United States between 1932-1933. Signed by Einstein at the bottom left margin, "Albert Einstein. 1933." Signed by Tycko at the bottom right margin, "Tycko / L.A." Matted and framed to an overall size of 18" x 22". Not examined outside of the frame. Frame is lightly scratched and rubbed in places.

buy now

Einstein, Albert

Deutscher Physiker und Nobelpreisträger (1879-1955). Originalfotografie mit eigenh. U. und Widmung („Für Frl. Lotte Marx / Albert Einstein. 1931“). O. O. 166 : 227 mm. Montiert.
$ 30,195 / 28.000 € (87769)

Schönes Brustbild des Nobelpreisträgers, mit Unterschrift und Widmung „Für Frl. Lotte Marx / Albert Einstein. 1931“. Albert Einstein ist einer der berühmtesten Wissenschaftler aller Zeiten. Für die Arbeit am „Lichtelektrischen Effekt" von 1905 erhielt er 1922 den Nobelpreis für Physik. Er hatte es verstanden zu erklären, warum Licht einen Strom zu erzeugen vermag, wenn es auf eine leitende Platte fällt. Heute ist dieser Effekt Grundlage für Lichtschranken und nicht zuletzt für den Laser.

Lotte Marx ist in dem Buch „Journey of Hope and Despair: Volume I. Rise and Fall" von Rudolf Hugo Moos erwähnt. Moos arbeitet darin die Geschichte seines Großvaters Rudolf Moos (1866-1951) war ein Cousin zweiten Grades von Albert Einstein. Als Unternehmer entwickelte er die Marken Salamander, Puma und Fasan. Bis 1933 war Albert Einstein mit seiner zweiten Ehefrau Elsa gern gesehener Gast in der Villa der Familie Moos in Nowawes in der Nähe von Potsdam. Einstein war es auch, der Moos, der jüdischer Herkunft war, und seiner Familie 1939 die Ausreise aus Deutschland ermöglichte. Lotte Marx war in der Villa in Potsdam zu Gast. Erwähnt ist sie anlässlich des 62. Geburtstags im November 1929: „[...] Many friends and relatives sent me greetings and best wishes, and we had a large dinner party in the evening. Our guests included Fritz Heinrichsdorff, Karl and Adele Heinrichsdorff, Helene Einstein, Helene Steiner, and Lotte Marx. We had a stimulating conversation, and then, as always, there was time for dancing. […] Helene Steiner visited us in November 1931 and told us about her niece, Lotte Marx. She had been having an extended affair with the son of Fritz Stahl, the wellknown composer, and she was now living with him. [...]" Am 28. Juni 1929 verlieh die Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft Max Planck und Einstein die Max-Planck-Medaille. Genau 50 Jahre zuvor hatte Planck als 21-Jähriger in München seine Doktorwürde erhalten. Auf dem Weg zum Physikalischen Institut musste Einstein an fast 1.000 grölenden nationalsozialistischen Studenten vorbei. Diesen Tag hatten Regierung und Reichspräsident zum „Tag der Trauer" ausgerufen: Zehn Jahre zuvor hatten die Deutschen Unterhändler in Versailles den Friedensvertrag unterzeichnet. Vor dem zunehmenden Antisemitismus flüchtete Einstein in die USA. Seit den 1930er Jahren war Albert Einstein weltweit bekannt. Wo er auftrat, wo er sprach, waren die Menschen begeistert. Im Dezember 1932 führte ihn eine Reise in die USA, von der er nach der Machtübernahme des NS-Regimes nicht mehr zurückkehrte. 1933 folgte der Austritt aus der Akademie der Wissenschaften und der Berliner Universität als Reaktion auf die Machtergreifung der Nationalsozialisten. Im Oktober 1940 nahm er die amerikanische Staatsbürgerschaft an. Eine Anekdote am Rande: Als Einstein 1931 während einer USA-Reise an der Premiere von Charlie Chaplin bei einer Filmpremiere von „Lichter der Großstadt" traf, soll es zu folgendem Dialog gekommen sein: Albert Einstein soll gesagt haben, „was ich an Ihrer Kunst am meisten bewundere, ist ihre Universalität. Sie sagen kein Wort, aber die ganze Welt versteht Sie!“ Worauf Chaplin erwidert haben soll: „Stimmt. Aber Ihre Kunst ist noch größer! Die ganze Welt bewundert Sie, auch wenn keiner ein Wort davon versteht, was Sie sagen.".

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Signed and inscribed photograph. no place. Overall size: 150 : 195 mm . Photograph: 164 : 116 mm.
$ 34,509 / 32.000 € (89405)

Rare photography of Albert Einstein (1879-1955), German-born theoretical physicist, widely acknowledged to be one of the greatest and most influential physicists of all time, with dedication to Wally Toscanini (1900-1991). The daughter of Arturo Toscanini (1867-1957), one of the most acclaimed and influential musicians of the late 19th and early 20th century. With the political situation in Europe worsening, in 1926 Arturo Toscanini accepted an invitation to conduct the New York Philharmonic Orchestra.

He continued to appear at La Scala through the 1929 season. In the spring and summer of 1929, Toscanini took the whole Scala company to Vienna and Berlin, where public, critics and professional musicians reacted with admiration to performances of six operas by Donizetti, Verdi, and Puccini. In Vienna they performed „Falstaff“ and „Lucia di Lammermoor“, in Berlin they performed „Falstaff“, „Il Trovatore“, Puccini’s „Manon Lescaut“, „Aida“ at the Staatsoper. At the Städtische Oper Unter den Linden they performed „Rigoletto“, „Lucia di Lammermoor“, which was partly radio broadcasted. Arturo Toscanini was strongly opposed to German and Italian fascism and left Europe for the United States in the mid-1930s. Albert Einstein left Germany for the United States in 1933. Einstein would later release a statement about Toscanini on the presentation of the American Hebrew Medal to him in 1938: “Only one who devotes himself to a cause with his whole strength and soul can be a true master. For this reason, mastery demands the whole person. Toscanini demonstrates this in every manifestation of his life.” In December 1930, Albert Einstein and Arturo Toscanini met backstage in New York, an article of the New York Times reports: “CERTAIN RELATIVITIES | Einstein and Toscanini Meet Backstage and Afford Demonstrations of Famous Theory | IT will be one week ago this afternoon that Albert Einstein listened to Arturo Toscanini's performance of Beethoven's "Pas total" symphony in the Metropolitan Opera House, applauded that performance warmly, then hastened backstage to talk with a master mind of music about the art that both men love. Mr. Einstein had reason to applaud, especial reason, since nothing illustrated more triumphantly than Toscanini’s performance the fundamental principle of the theory of relativity and its applicability to art as well as physics. Relativity in the realm of physics is, of course, one thing; relativity in the domain of art another. But in both fields a basic principle obtains, which destroys the possibility of fixed standards of measurement and teaches us that the universe itself is a thing of relative and not absolute, irrefragable values. The reviews of the Toscanini interpretation of the “Pastoral” symphony offered a good case in point. All the reviews were emphatic of the superlative qualities of the performance. The only question on which certain reviewers expressed differences of opinion was whether Toscanini’s superlative treatment of the symphony coincided precisely with the thought of Beethoven. [...]” The scientist repeatedly praised the musician, also in personal letters, for his attitude towards the Nazis and his support for Jews. In 1936 he wrote to the “Verehrten Maestro!”: “You are not just an unparalleled interpreter of universal musical literature […] You have also proven that you are a man of great dignity in the fight against the fascist criminals [...] The fact that a contemporary like you exists dispels many of the disappointments that on is continually subjected to [...]” With the help both of Einstein and Toscanini, celebrated Polish violinist Bronisław Huberman (1882-1947) saved some of the world's greatest musicians from the Nazis. They managed to help almost 1,000 musicians escape to Palestine. Together with them, he founded the Palestine Symphony Orchestra, which today enjoys worldwide fame as the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra. Acquired from a German private collection..

buy now

Einstein, Albert

Physiker und Nobelpreisträger (1879-1955). Die formale Grundlage der allgemeinen Relativitätstheorie. Author’s presentation offprint from Sitzungsberichte der Königlich Preussischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, XLI, 19 November 1914. Berlin: Königlichen Akademie der Wissenschaften. Gr.-8vo. S. 1030-85. OBrosch. (Sitzungsberichte der königl. preussischen Akademie der Wissenschaften XLI). Leichte Knickfalten durch Versand. Geringe Gebrauchsspuren.
$ 107,840 / 100.000 € (89479)

Author’s presentation offprint of "Die formale Grundlage der allgemeinen Relativitätstheorie [The Formal Basis of the General Theory of Relativity]" from Sitzungsberichte der Königlich Preussischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, XLI, 19 November 1914. Berlin: Königlichen Akademie der Wissenschaften. 1914. Gr.-8vo. S. 1030-85. Bound in the original printed wrappers, 7 x 10, inscribed [autograph] in Einstein's hand, "Mit aller Hochachtung [With all respect]," over the imprinted text, "Überreicht vom Verfasser [Submitted by the Author]." On page 1069, Einstein adds a lengthy formula in his hand, and on page 1072 he writes: "Hier ist benutzt, dass auch das System K 2 dem invarianten [oder: unvariiertem] Felde angepasst ist [Here it is used that the system K 2 is also adapted to the invariant [or: unvarying] field].".

In fine condition, with a light central vertical fold, and soiling and handling wear to the covers. Accompanied by a letter of authentication from Viennese Antiquarian Book Dealer Ingo Nebehay, 1982. First edition of this extremely rare offprint, a remarkable association copy. The present paper was the crucial step between Einstein’s Entwurf theory of 1913 and the final form of general relativity which Einstein completed in November 1915: it develops the mathematical techniques necessary for the final formulation, namely the ‘absolute differential calculus’ of Tullio Levi-Civita, as well as the expression of the field equations in terms of a variational principle, which later proved to be of great importance. This author’s presentation offprint, with "Überreicht vom Verfasser" printed on upper wrapper, must not to be confused with the much more common trade offprint which lacks this printed statement (see below). We have located only one copy of this author’s presentation offprint at auction, in the collection belonging to Einstein’s son Hans Albert sold at Christie’s in 2006 (there was no copy in Einstein’s own collection of his offprints sold by Christie’s in 2008). "In summer 1914, Einstein felt that the new theory should be presented in a comprehensive review. He also felt that a mathematical derivation of the field equations that would determine them uniquely was still missing. Both tasks are addressed in a long paper, presented in October 1914 to the Prussian Academy for publication in its Sitzungsberichte. It is entitled ‘The formal foundation of the general theory of relativity’; here, for the first time, Einstein gave the new theory of relativity the epithet ‘general’ in lieu of the more cautious 'generalized' that he had used for the Entwurf" (Landmark Writings in Western Mathematics 1640-1940). "In the year that he was called to Berlin, on October 29, 1914, Einstein was able to present his work "Die formale Grundlage der allgemeinen Relativitätstheorie"…The "formal foundation" of the general theory of relativity was the tensor calculus. Without the tensor calculus, the general theory of relativity could not have been formulated…By October 1914, Einstein was finally able to present his results in mathematical form, and indeed in a manner that became the basis of his general theory of relativity of 1916. He introduced general covariants, contravariants, and also—what was new—mixed tensors, in order to represent the individual arithmetic operations, above all, the various types of multiplication. Thus the mathematical calculus necessary for the general theory of relativity was at the ready in 1914" (Reich). "The principal novelty [in the present paper] lies in the mathematical formulation of the theory. Drawing on earlier work with [Marcel] Grossman, Einstein formulated his gravitational field equations using a variation principle" (Calaprice, 47). The first important stage in the development of Einstein’s theory of gravitation was accomplished, with his friend and classmate the mathematician Marcel Grossmann, in their 1913 work Entwurf einer verallgemeinerten Relativitätstheorie und einer Theorie der Gravitation. "In this book, Einstein and Grossman investigated curved space and curved time as they relate to a theory of gravity. They presented virtually all the elements of the general theory of relativity with the exception of one striking omission: gravitational field equations that were not generally covariant. Einstein soon reconciled himself to this lack of general covariance through the ‘hole argument,’ which sought to establish that generally covariant gravitational field equations would be physically uninteresting" (Calaprice 40). Einstein’s ‘hole argument’, he believed, implied that general covariance was incompatible with the requirement that the distribution of mass-energy should determine the gravitational field uniquely. He believed, therefore, that the field equations should only be valid in certain coordinate systems, which he called ‘adapted’, and that only coordinate transformations from one adapted system to another adapted system should be allowed – he called these ‘justified coordinate transformations’. "Einstein’s move to Berlin in April 1914 marked the end of his collaboration with Grossmann. Fortunately, by this time Einstein no longer seems to have needed Grossmann’s mathematical guidance. By October 1914, he had completed a lengthy summary article [offered here] on his new theory, whose form and detailed nature suggest that Einstein felt his theory had reached its final form. The article contained a review of the methods of tensor calculus used in the theory and, flexing his newfound mathematical muscles, Einstein could even promise to give new and simpler derivations of the basic laws of the ‘absolute differential calculus’. Of great importance was the fact that Einstein had taken the new mathematical techniques of his last paper with Grossmann, generalized them and found in them a quite new derivation of the field equations" (Norton, p. 293). This new derivation made use, for the first time in Einstein’s work on the theory of gravity, of an action principle (or variational principle). Einstein worked initially with an action that was an arbitrary function of the metric tensor and its first derivatives, and then showed that with a particular choice of the action he could recover the Entwurf field equations. He further believed that he had found a simple general covariance condition which forced the action to take the Entwurf form. "Einstein had good reason to be pleased with this result. For it seemed to show that his theory was not just a theory of gravitation, but a generalized theory of relativity, in so far as it was concerned with establishing the widest covariance possible in its equations. His original derivation of the field equations [in Entwurf] had been based squarely on considerations in gravitation theory…The new derivation, however, focused on covariance considerations. He had found a simple way of formulating field equations that would have exactly the maximum covariance allowed by the ‘hole argument’, and they led him almost directly to his original Entwurf field equations. As a result he could promise to "recover the equations of the gravitational field in a purely-covariant-theoretical way" and claim to "have arrived at quite definite field equations in a purely formal way, i.e., without directly drawing on our physical knowledge of gravitation"… "Einstein appears to have remained satisfied with the theory he developed in 1914 through the first half of 1915. In March, April and early May he defended the theory wholeheartedly in an intense correspondence with Levi-Cività, who challenged Einstein’s derivation of the covariance properties of his gravitation tensor. But it seems that by mid-July he was less certain…By mid-October Einstein’s points of dissatisfaction with his theory had grown in number and intensity. They soon culminated in some of the most agitated and strenuous works of his life, in which generally covariant field equations were discovered…Einstein’s work [in the present paper] had brought him both temporally and conceptually closer than ever before to a generally covariant theory…It is hard to imagine that Einstein was unprepared for the ease with which his formalism of 1914 could be applied to his final generally covariant theory" (Norton, pp. 296-303). After publishing the generally covariant theory in November 1915, Einstein gave a further treatment of the variational formulation (Hamiltonsches Prinzip und allgemeine Relativitätstheorie, Sitzungsberichte (1916), pp. 1111-1116). By this time, the great German mathematician David Hilbert had published his own account of general relativity in terms of a variational principle [Die Grundlagen der Physik (Erste Mitteilung), Nachrichten der Königliche Gesellschaft der Wissenschaften zu Göttingen. Mathematisch-physikalische Klasse, November 1915, 395-407]. This led to some controversy over who had been the first to publish the final version of general relativity (although Hilbert himself never claimed priority). "Hilbert, through his important paper of November 1915, is generally thought of as introducing the comprehensive use of these action principles to the theory. My analysis shows that although Einstein might have drawn some of his work of 1916 in this area from Hilbert’s, his basic mathematical apparatus and even the notation itself had its ancestry in his own work earlier in 1914 and 1915" (Norton, p. 303). This author’s presentation offprint is of extreme rarity, and must be distinguished from other so-called ‘offprints’ of papers from the Berlin Sitzungsberichte, many of which are commonly available on the market. The celebrated bookseller Ernst Weil (1919-1981), in the introduction to his Einstein bibliography, wrote: "I have often been asked about the number of those offprints. It seems to be certain that there were few before 1914. They were given only to the author, and mostly ‘Überreicht vom Verfasser’ (Presented by the Author) is printed on the wrapper. Later on, I have no doubt, many more offprints were made, and also sold as such, especially by the Berlin Academy." If the term ‘offprint’ means, as we believe it should, a separate printing of a journal article given (only) to the author for distribution to colleagues, then ‘offprints’ were not commercially available. Although there is certainly some truth in Weil’s remark, in our view it requires clarification and explanation. Until about 1916, most of Einstein’s papers were published in Annalen der Physik; from 1916 until he left Germany for the United States in 1933, most were published in the Berlin Sitzungsberichte. The Sitzungsberichte differed from other journals in which Einstein published in that it made separate printings of its papers commercially available. These separate printings have ‘Sonderabdruck’ printed on the front wrapper, the usual German term for offprint, but they are not offprints according to our definition. They were available to anyone; indeed a price list of these ‘trade offprints’ is printed on the rear wrapper. True author’s presentation offprints can be distinguished from these trade offprints by the presence of ‘Überreicht vom Verfasser’ on the front wrapper. In the period 1916 to 1919 or 1920, the Sitzungsberichte trade offprints are themselves rare: for example, ABPC/RBH list only three ‘offprints’ of Einstein’s famous 1917 Sitzungsberichte paper ‘Kosmologische Betrachtungen zur allgemeinen Relativitätstheorie’ (the auction records do not distinguish between trade and author’s presentation offprints). After 1919 or 1920, however, the trade offprints became much more common, although the author’s presentation offprints are still very rare. The reason for this change is that it was only in 1919 that Einstein became famous among the general public. It might seem obvious that Einstein’s fame dates from 1905, his ‘annus mirabilis’, in which he published his epoch-making papers on special relativity and the light quantum. However, these works did not make him immediately well known even in the physics community – many physicists did not understand or accept his work, and it was two or three years before his genius was fully accepted even by his colleagues. He secured his first academic position, at the University of Bern, in 1908. Among the general public, Einstein became well known only in late 1919, following the success of Eddington’s expedition to observe the bending of light by the Sun, which confirmed Einstein’s general theory of relativity. This was front-page news, and made Einstein universally famous. (See Chapter 16, ‘The suddenly famous Doctor Einstein’, in Pais, Subtle is the Lord, for an account of these events). Before 1919 the trade offprints of Einstein’s papers would probably only have been purchased by professional physicists; after 1919 everyone wanted a memento of the famous Dr. Einstein, whether or not they understood anything of theoretical physics, and the trade offprints of his papers were printed and sold in far greater numbers than before to meet the demand. It is telling that when these post-1919 trade offprints appear on the market, they are often in mint condition – they were never read simply because their owners were unable to understand them. Boni 65; Weil 68. Calaprice, The Einstein Almanac; Norton, ‘How Einstein Found His Field Equations: 1912-1915’, Historical Studies in the Physical Sciences 14 (1984), pp. 253-316; Norton, ‘Einstein and Nordström: some lesser-known thought experiments in gravitation,’ pp. 3-30 in The Attraction of Gravitation: New Studies in the History of General Relativity, edited by John Earman, Michel Janssen, John D. Norton, 1993; Reich, Einstein’s "Formal Foundations of the General Theory of Relativity" (1914) (http://mathineurope.eu/images/information_pic/hist_phil_pic/calendar_pic/2014einstein/Einstein_English.pdf). For the history of tensor calculus, including Einstein’s application of it to general relativity, see Reich, Die Entwicklung des Tensorkalküls, Birkhäuser 2012..

buy now

Einstein, Albert

dt. Physiker, Begründer der Relativitätstheorie (1879-1955). Eigenhändige Unterschrift auf Albumblatt. ohne Ort. Quer-8vo. (85 : 60 mm).
$ 4,853 / 4.500 € (90774)

Eigenhändige Unterschrift auf Albumblatt „A. Einstein“ auf Albumblatt mit aufgezogenem Zeitungsporträt sowie Zusätze von fremder Hand „Professor Einstein. 14.2.30“. Hübscher und mittlerweile seltener Namenszug des Nobelpreisträgers. - Beiliegt: unsignierte Portraitpostkarte aus den 1990er Jahren „Albert Einstein in Caputh, 1925“.

buy now

Einstein, Albert

dt. Physiker, Begründer der Relativitätstheorie; Nobelpreisträger (1879-1955). Ms. Brief mit eigenh. Korrektur und Unterschrift. Berlin. Gr.-4to. 1 1/4 pp. Gedr. Briefkopf „ALBERT EINSTEIN | Berlin W. | Haberlandstr.5“. Gelocht. Stärkere Randläsuren.
$ 26,960 / 25.000 € (91156)

Wissenschaftlich bedeutender Brief an Ernst Klug in Immenstadt im Allgäu mit eigneh. Korrekturen: „[…] Aus Zeitmangel antworte ich nur auf Ihre erste Frage: betreffend der Natur des Schwerefelds. Richtig ist, dass relativ zu einem (gegen einen feldfreien Raum) beschleunigtes System ein Schwerefeld existiert. Nicht richtig ist aber, dass jedes jedes beliebig gestaltete Schwerefeld (zum B. das der Erde) durch beschleunigte Bewegung eines Bezugskörpers erzeugt werden könne. Die durch Beschleunigung ,erzeugten’ Schwerefelder sind eben solche von ganz spezieller Struktur.

Ich illustriere durch einen Vergleich aus der gewöhnlichen Mechanik. Man kann das Koordinatensystem so wählen, dass in einem bestimmten Augenblick ein Körper, z.B. die Erde in Ruhe ist. Die Bewegung der Erde ist also bedingt durch die Wahl des Bewegungssystems des Koordinatensystems. Man kann aber das Koordinatensystem nicht so wählen, dass relativ zu ihm gleichzeitig sowohl Erde als Mond in Ruhe sind. Durch den Bewegungszustand des mechanischen Koordinatensystems können eben nur solche Bewegungen ,erzeugt’ werden, bei welcher alle Körper dieselbe Geschwindigkeit und Bewegungsrichtung haben. Diese Analogie dürfte den Sachverhalt genügend aufklären. […]“.

buy now

Einstein, Albert

Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstherorie (1879-1955). Ms. Brief mit eigenh. Unterschrift. Princeton. 4to. 1 p. Blindgepr. Briefkopf „A. Einstein […]“. Faltspuren, Abdruck einer Büroklammer. Die untere linke Ecke fehlend.
$ 8,088 / 7.500 € (91994)

An den Theaterintendant, Regisseur und Theaterpädagoge Erwin Piscator (1893-1966): „[…] Beiliegend sende ich ein Schreiben von den gewünschten Art in der Hoffnung, dass es zur Ebnung Ihres Weges beitrage. […]“ - Beiliegend: 3 Durchschläge von Schreiben zwischen Pisctor und Einstein.

buy now

Einstein, Albert

Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstherorie (1879-1955). Typed letter signed „A. Einstein“. Pasadena. 4to. 1 p. Bleistift.
$ 15,637 / 14.500 € (93330)

To B. C. Menowitz [i.e., Berl ben Meyr] in Los Angeles, first in handwriting: "Enclosed is the requested note about your book, of which I have enjoyed partial reading." Then, in typewritten text: "This book is written for laypeople; hence, I feel entitled to speak in its favor. In this era of medical superstition, such an easily understandable book, authored by an expert, about microorganisms and their significance for humanity, is a true blessing. Apart from its practical importance, the work also serves as a source of pure joy for the reader, vividly bringing an important aspect of natural processes to their attention.

Science can only fully fulfill its social mission when what has been painstakingly achieved by experts becomes common knowledge in its essential aspects. This book is a valuable contribution to achieving this goal." In a postscriptum, he added: "Your manuscript is at the desk at the Athenaeum. May I ask you to get it? Thank you." Berl ben Meyr's work, titled "The Story of Microbes Your Germs and Mine," was published in 1934 with a preface by Albert Einstein..

buy now

Einstein, Albert

Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstherorie (1879-1955). Typed document signed. Pasadena. Kl.-4to. 1 p. Gedr. Briefkopf „Gabriel Segall, M.D.“.
$ 15,637 / 14.500 € (93331)

Einstein’ preface for Berl ben Meyr work: The Story of Microbes Your Germs and Minedie, which was published in 1934. „Translated Copy | This is a book for laymen; that is why I may say a word in its favor. In this age of medical superstitions such an easily understood book about microbes and their significance to human beings, written by a competent person, is a true blessing. Aside from its practical value this volume is a source of real pleasure for the reader because it acquaints him vividly with an important phase of nature’s workings.

| Science is able to accomplish fully its social function only when the essential facts of its workers’ hard-won achievements become common knowledge. Towards such an aim this work is a fine contribution. […]“ Berl ben Meyr's work, titled "The Story of Microbes Your Germs and Mine," was published in 1934 with a preface by Albert Einstein..

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Original photograph unsigned. no place. 132 : 190 mm. Irregularly trimmed.
$ 1,078 / 1.000 € (93336)

Original World Wide photograph „A-9288“ for release to papers of Sunday, February 1, with Frank Carey’s Princeton Wide World Story on Dr. Albert Einstein THE WIZARD OF SCIENCE. „An interesting camera study of Dr. Albert Einstein, the famed 62-year-old German-Jewish refugee scientist, who since 1933 has been making his home at Princeton, N.J. […]“ - With various marks and stamps on the verso.

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Typed letter signed „A. Einstein“. Berlin W., Haberlandstr. 5. 4to. 1 p. Printed letterhead. Folded. Some age toning.
$ 30,195 / 28.000 € (93436)

To aspiring Romanian physicist Melanie Serbu (1909-1979), in German. Perhaps impressed by her boldness, Einstein replied by recommending a book introducing his theory: Die Idee der Relativitätstheorie (1921) by Hans Thirring: „You have evidently got hold of one of those popularizations of the theory of relativity which only superficially touches on the subject. . . . However, this cannot be understood without prior knowledge of physics. If you have such prior knowledge, I recommend reading a book on this subject that Prof.

Thirring has published at the University of Vienna.“ „Sie haben augenscheinlich eine von jenen Popularisierungen der Relativitäts-Theorie in die Hand bekommen, die nur ganz äusserlich den Gegenstand streift. Dies entnehme ich daraus, dass Sie glauben, die angeführte Stelle des Romans könnte mit der Theorie etwas zu schaffen haben. Diese aber lässt sich ohne physikalische Vorkenntnisse nicht verstehen. Für den Fall, dass Sie über solche Vorkenntnisse verfügen, empfehle ich Ihnen die Lektüre eines Buches, das Herr Prof. Thirring an der Universität Wien über diesen Gegenstand hat erscheinen lassen. […]“.

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Autograph Letter Signed, "A. Einstein". No place. 4to. 1 p. Faint scattered soiling, minor loss to lower left corner, folds.
$ 26,960 / 25.000 € (93437)

Nice letter to Ruth Norden, in German, praising her translation, approving of her community with some exceptions [participants in 1939 World's Fair?], suggesting other acceptable candidates, inquiring about possible candidates from other countries, comparing a potential candidate to Freud, observing that people would be less vulnerable if their quality were as high as they are numerous, and expressing gratitude for a long telegram. Norden who was responsible for translating a number of Einstein’s writings into English.

One of these was his 1938 article “Why do they hate the Jews?”, which was his only public discussion of Hitler’s campaign against the Jews. "You have done a great translating job and it is factually better than the original. The community that you take interest in seems very likable to me, except for Lindberg [Charles Lindbergh], who hasn't shown much concern for the suffering of human beings. As far as Maderiaga [Salvador de Madariaga] is concerned, I am not quite sure whether he is an honest human being--so I'll have to add a question mark to him as well. . . . I would also accept Andre Gide and Albert Schweitzer as well. Maybe [Ignazio] Silone as well . . . . Is there any Russian out there that seems acceptable and has not been decapitated yet? I know of none, and neither do I know any Scandinavian, Dutch, South American, Spaniard and none from the English Colonies. Just like with Freud; probably only to be used as a one-horse carriage. "Looking at today's humankind, one can only notice with regret that the numbers do not make up for quality: if quantity would substitute for quality we'd be in great shape compared to tiny old Greece. "Finally, I have to express my condolences for your poor wallet since you have sent such a lengthy telegram. I was very touched and will show it to your potential husband to keep him from making the wrong decision; so please keep me informed." In September of 1938, the Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing Company deposited a time capsule at the site of the 1938 New York World's Fair to be opened 5,000 years hence. The capsule contained letters addressed to the future inhabitants of Earth by luminaries of the day, including Thomas Mann, Robert A. Millikan, and Albert Einstein. According to a September 16, 1938 New York Times article, "Einstein Hopeful for Better World," the uncredited but "authorized English translation" of Einstein's letter contained the observation that "people living in different countries kill each other at irregular time intervals, so that . . . any one who thinks about the future must live in fear and terror. This is due to the fact that the intelligence and character of the masses are incomparably lower than the intelligence and character of the few who produce something valuable for the community. I trust that posterity will read these statements with a feeling of proud and justified superiority." It is likely that the translator of Einstein's time capsule letter was Ruth Norden, who was responsible for many of Einstein's English translations at the time, including "Why Do They Hate the Jews," published in Collier's Magazine on November 26, 1938. The work praised in the present lot is probably the very same time capsule letter translation. „Sie haben die Sache prachtvoll übersetzt; es ist faktisch besser als das Original. Die von Ihnen ins Auge gefasste Gemeinschaft gefällt mir recht gut bis auf Lindberg [d.i. Charles Lindbergh], der doch nicht gezeigt hat, dass er für die Leiden der Menschenwelt viel übrig hat. Bei Maderiaga [d.i. Salvador de Madariaga] bin ich nicht sicher, ob er ein ehrlicher Mensch ist; zu ihm muss ich auch ein Fragezeichen setzen. Über mich selbst will ich schweigen oder zu meinen Gunsten anführen, dass mich die andern ja nicht so genau kennen. Ich würde den André Gide doch aufnehmen, ausserdem Albert Schweizer. Vielleicht auch den [Ignazio] Silone, jenen wunderbaren Autor von Brod [!] und Wein. Gibt es vielleicht auch einen passenden noch ungeköpften Russen? Ich weiss keinen, auch keinen Skaninavier, Holländer, Südamerikaner, Spanier, keinen aus Englands Colonialreich. Wie mit Freud; wahrscheinlich nur als Einspänner zu gebrauchen? Schaut man auf die heutige Menschheit, so kann man nur mit Bedauern feststellen, dass die Zahl kein Ersatz für Qualität gewähren kann; sonst wären wir ja glänzend gegenüber dem popligen alten Griechenland. Schliesslich muss ich noch mein Beileid aussprechen für Ihren armen Geldbeutel von wegen des langen Telegramms. Ich war sehr betroffen und werde es Ihrem eventuellen Zukünftigen zeigen, um ihn wenn möglich von einem unüberlegten Schritt abzuhalten; benachrichtigen Sie mich als bitte rechtzeitig. […]“.

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Typed letter signed „A. Einstein“. Princeton. 4to. 1 p. Punch holes to the top. Stapled.
$ 30,195 / 28.000 € (93471)

Einstein writes to Charlie Chaplin: „I take the liberty to introduce to you Miss Clara Mayer. She is appealing to you i the interest of The New School of Social Resarch in New York, the very wellknown foundation of Professor Alvin Jonson, where prominent Refugee-Scholars of different fields are teaching. I am especially interested in this institution because of my dear old friend, the psychologist Professor Max Wertheimer is working there. He is the inventor of the ,Gestalt-Theorie’ in Psychology.

Miss Mayer is secretary of the New School of social Research. […]“ - Enclosed is a ALS and the envelope of Clara Mayer to Chaplin. San Francisco. July 6, 1940, 1 p.: „The enclosed letter contains some unadorned facts - of no great interest. If, however, on the basis of Albert Einstein’s introduction you were to grant me the privilege of an interview, my story, I think, would have more than passing interest. I shall reach the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles near the end of next week and telephone your sudios for an answer. Knowing the mass of correspondence that must daily be addressed to you, I have registered this letter as an index of its very great importance to me. […]“.

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Typed letter signed ("A. Einstein"). Princeton. 4to. 1 p. 212 : 278mm (light mailing folds impacting signature, two small spots of loss at the centerfolds).
$ 16,176 / 15.000 € (93522)

In German. Einstein supports Austrian educator Eugenie Schwarzwald, founder of the "Schwarzwald'sche school" for young women, after her assets were seized by the Nazis. In response to a prior letter from Mr. Cushing, Einstein writes: „[…] I personally feel great respect and warm sympathy for Mrs. Schwarzwald. However, since I lead a rather isolated life, I have few personal acquaintances and no knowledge of people who could be approached... If you should learn about such people from your American friends, I should be very glad to write to them.

Also, I should be able to make a modest contribution myself […]“ This letter relates to Mrs. Eugenie Schwarzwald -- a progressive Austrian philanthropist who founded the innovative Schwarzwald school to educate Austrian girls. She was forced to leave Austria due to her Jewish ancestry, where her assets were seized by the Nazis and the Schwarzwald schools were forcibly closed. Edward Cushing began the "Schwarzwald fund" to financially support her after the seizure of her assets, and in conjunction with American journalist Dorothy Thompson, rallied for their intended emigration to America - likely referenced here. (see Deutschsprachige Exiliterature seit 1933, John M. Spalek et al., p. 379)..

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Photograph signed ("A Einstein 1947"). n. p. 176 : 128 mm.
$ 37,744 / 35.000 € (93523)

Albert Einstein and his famous bomber jacket. A contemplative pose of Einstein holding his pipe taken by Lotte Jacobi during the 1938 photo session she undertook with the theoretical physicist for Life magazine. - Photograph by Lotte JACOBI (1896-1990), Princeton, 1938. Annotated in pencil on verso: "Albert Einstein pl. credit Lotte Jacobi 2299-2".

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Typed letter signed „A. Einstein“. Berlin W., Haberlandstr. 5. 4to. 1 1/2 pp. Printed letterhead. Folded. Age toning. Letter with chipping along right edge and complete separations at folds repaired verso with cello tape.
$ 16,176 / 15.000 € (93533)

To aspiring Romanian physicist Melanie Serbu (1909-1979) expressing surprise at her gifted insight into natural science. „Your extraordinarily intelligent and sympathetic letter gave me great pleasure. It is very rare that a person with so little prior education has so much understanding for the fundamental problem of physical science. . . . I was extraordinarily surprised that you immediately saw the point where the next progress must begin, namely the unity of the natural forces. I've been working on this problem for 13 years and I think I've found the solution right now. "If your heart is set on studying mathematics, I would try to pave the way for you to do so.[…]“ „Ihr ausserordentlich intelligenter und sympathischer Brief hat mir grosse Freude gemacht.

Es ist ganz selten, dass ein so wenig vorgebildeter Mensch soviel Verständnis für das Grundproblem der physikalischen Wissenschaft aufbringt. Es scheint mir übrigens, dass Sie den Vergleich der endlichen Welt mit der Kugelfläche nicht richtig aufgefasst haben Es wird nämlich die räumlich dreidimensionale endliche Welt mit der zweidimensionalen Kugelfläche verglichen. Aber dem Raum ausserhalb der Kugelfläche entspricht nichts in der zu illustrierenden, bezw. darzustellenden Welt. Hier hat der Vergleich seine Grenze. - Ausserordentlich überrascht hat es mich, dass Sie gleich den Punkt gesehen haben, wo der nächste Fortschritt einsetzen muss, nämlich die Einheit der Naturkräfte. An diesem Problem arbeite ich seit 13 Jahren und glaube gerade jetzt seine Lösung gefunden zu haben Wenn Ihnen das Herz daran hängt, Mathematik zu studieren, so würde ich mich bemühen, Ihnen den Weg dazu zu ebnen. Ich möchte Sie aber darauf aufmerksam machen, dass dieses Studium sich bei Frauen fast immer rächt, weil ihnen die grosse und beständige geistige Anstrengung meist nicht gut bekommt. Wenn Sie aber unschlüssig sind, so versuchen Sie einmal privatim nben dem Beruf ein geeignetes Werk über Mathematik zu studieren, um sich selbst zu prüfen. Wenn Sie mir den Stand Ihrer diesbezüglichen Bildung mitteilen, so werde ich Ihnen ein geeignetes Werk senden. Ich danke Ihnen freundlichst für Ihre Photographie. […]“.

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Typed letter signed „A. Einstein“. Berlin W., Haberlandstr. 5. 4to. 1 p. Printed letterhead. Small tears to folds. Some age toning.
$ 16,176 / 15.000 € (93534)

To aspiring Romanian physicist Melanie Serbu (1909-1979), in German, recommending books to advance her independent study in physics and mathematics. „I see from your letter that you really have a fervent interest in the study. . . . I will send you books that I think are well suited for self-study. . . . The main thing: proceed very slowly and never rush. There must always be a feeling that it is a matter of real pleasure. If this feeling goes away, then stop.“ „Ich sehe aus Ihrem Briefe, dass Sie wirklich ein glühendes Interesse für das Studium haben.

Unter diesen Umständen halte ich es für richtig, dass Sie sich zunächst einmal ganz selbständig, langsam und geduldig mit dem mathematischen Fundament bekannt machen. Ich werde Ihnen dazu Bücher schicken, die nach meiner Meinung für das Selbststudium gut geeignet sind. Dies geschieht allerdings unter der Voraussetzung, dass Ihnen Ihr Beruf die nötige Muse lässt für ein solches Studium. Sie werden sehen, dass es mit grossem Genuss verbunden ist. Hauptsache: Ganz langsam vorgehn und nie eilen. Immer muss das Gefühl vorherrschen, dass es sich um wahrhaftes Vergnügen handelt. Wenn dieses Gefühl weggeht, dann aufhören.“ Published in: The Collected Papers of Albert Einstein, Volume 16, ed. Buchwald (Princeton University Press, 2021), No. 382..

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Typed postcard signed „A. Einstein“. Berlin W., Haberlandstr. 5. Oblong-8vo. 1 p.
$ 8,088 / 7.500 € (93535)

To aspiring Romanian physicist Melanie Serbu (1909-1979), in German. "I recommend starting with geometry (planimetry) for the time being. A textbook for algebra will follow. [...]" „Ich rate Ihnen, einstweilen mit Geometrie (Planimetrie) anzufangen. Ein Lehrbuch für Algebra folgt. […]“

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Typed letter signed „A. Einstein“. Berlin W., Haberlandstr. 5, z.zt. Caputh b. Potsdam. 4to. 1/2 p. Printed letterhead. Smaller tears to folds.
$ 7,010 / 6.500 € (93536)

To aspiring Romanian physicist Melanie Serbu (1909-1979), in German. Einstein probably included a letter of recommendation. "Enclosed is the requested letter, in which, of course, only as much is stated as I can justify." „Anbei das gewünschte Schreiben, indem natürlich nur soviel steht, als ich verantworten kann.“

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Typed letter signed „A. Einstein“. Watch Hill. 4to. 1/2 p. Printed letterhead.
$ 13,480 / 12.500 € (93537)

To aspiring Romanian physicist Melanie Serbu (1909-1979), in German. "I am extremely pleased that you now have the opportunity to begin your studies. However, I suspect that the teachers in Bucharest may not be particularly good. Never attend a lecture that you cannot fully follow. Study mostly from books that you consider suitable." Frank wrote a paper on causality that impressed Albert Einstein, leading to an active exchange between the two. Frank completed his habilitation in 1910 at the University of Vienna and became a lecturer there.

On Einstein's recommendation, Frank became his successor at the German University in Prague in 1912, where he stayed until 1938. „Ich freue mich ausserordentlich, dass Sie nun Gelegenheit haben, das Studium aufzunehmen. Allerdings vermute ich, dass die Lehrkräfte in Bukarest nicht gerade viel taugen werden. Besuchen Sie nie eine Vorlesung, der Sie nicht völlig folgen können. Studieren Sie grossenteils aus Büchern, die Sie selber für geeignet halten.“.

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Typed letter signed „A. Einstein“. Princeton. 4to. 1 p. Expected folds.
$ 13,480 / 12.500 € (93538)

To aspiring Romanian physicist Melanie Serbu (1909-1979), in German. "I consider it conceivable that you could study at the German University in Prague. The theoretical physicist there, Professor Philipp Frank, is a friend of mine and a quite wealthy man. He will surely make an effort to facilitate your admission if I write to him. I will do the latter as soon as you express a corresponding desire. I am convinced that this would be the right choice for you, both from a scientific and practical standpoint." Frank wrote a paper on causality that impressed Albert Einstein, leading to an active exchange between the two.

Frank completed his habilitation in 1910 at the University of Vienna and became a lecturer there. On Einstein's recommendation, Frank became his successor at the German University in Prague in 1912, where he stayed until 1938. „Ich halte es für denkbar, dass Sie an der deutschen Universität in Prag studieren könnten. Der dortige theoretische Physiker, Professor Philipp Frank ist ein Freund von mir und ein recht wohlhabender Mann. Er wird sich sicher bemühen, Ihnen die Aufnahme zu ermöglichen, wenn ich ihm schreibe. Letzteres will ich tun, sobald Sie einen diesbezüglichen Wunsch aussprechen. Ich bin überzeugt, dass dies für Sie das Richtige wäre, sowohl vom wissenschaftlichen wie vom praktischen Standpunkt aus.“.

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Typed letter signed „A. Einstein“. Princeton. 4to. 1/2 p.
$ 13,480 / 12.500 € (93539)

To the young aspiring Romanian physicist Melanie Serbu (1909-1979), in German. "Write to Professor Franck and inform him about what you have studied so far and from which source, and for what reason you are compelled to seek a study opportunity abroad. My friend will surely make an effort to assist you. Hoping that your endeavor will be successful, I send friendly greetings [...]" „Schreiben Sie an Professor Franck und teilen Sie ihm mit, was und aus welcher Quelle Sie bisher studiert haben und aus welchem Grunde Sie genötigt sind, nach einer Studiengelegenheit im Auslande zu suchen.

Mein Freund wird sicher bemüht sein, Ihnen zu helfen. In der Hoffnung, dass Ihr Streben von Erfolg sein wird grüsst Sie freundlich […]“.

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Typed letter signed „A. Einstein“. Princeton. 4to. 1 p. Blind embossed letterhead.
$ 18,872 / 17.500 € (93540)

To the young aspiring Romanian physicist Melanie Serbu (1909-1979), in German. "I too was discouraged as a student by the abundance of wisdom that ruthlessly rained down on me at the university. Only later did I realize that most of it was not as sensible as it initially seemed. Do not attend lectures that you cannot comfortably follow; rather, follow your inclination. The main thing is that you slowly learn to master the elements of higher mathematics and their physical applications. The rest will follow later.

Collaborating with one or two like-minded individuals is advantageous and helps overcome initial difficulties." „Auch ich wurde als Student durch die viele Weisheit entmutigt, die an der Hochschule schonungslos auf mich niederprasselte. Später erst erkannte ich, dass das Meiste lange nicht so vernünftig war, als es zuerst aussah. Besuchen Sie keine Vorlesung, der Sie nicht bequem folgen können und folgen Sie lieber Ihrer Neigung. Die Hauptsache ist, dass Sie die Elemente der höheren Mathematik und ihre physikalische Anwendung langsam beherrschen lernen. Das Uebrige ergibt sich später. Zusammenarbeit mit ein oder zwei gleichstrebenden Menschen ist vorteilhaft und hilft überanfängliche Schwierigkeiten hinweg. […]“.

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Autograph letter signed „A. Einstein“. Princeton. 4to. 1 1/3 pp. Blind embossed letterhead.
$ 30,734 / 28.500 € (93541)

To the young aspiring Romanian physicist Melanie Serbu (1909-1979), in German giving her advises. "Frank wrote approvingly of your great enthusiasm, which caught his attention. One can learn a lot from him because he is intelligent and clear, though scientific inventiveness has not been bestowed upon him to the same extent. You must learn not to take people, including yourself, too seriously. It's not worth it. The deep penetration into the laws of nature is so difficult that a generation doesn't accomplish much in this regard.

However, this is only apparent after struggling with it long enough, fortunately, because where else would one find the courage in youth? Teaching is a lovely thing if one has the talent for it. Often, it only results in discouragement for the young when the teacher lacks sufficient insight and empathy into the psyches of the listeners. Universities are usually bad in this respect. Beware of Reichinstein [i.e., David Reichinstein (1882-1955)], whom you have judged quite well. The strangest thing about him is that he manages to have a strangely good opinion of himself—admirable. If you later study physics, read the introductory books by A. Haas. They are not particularly clean but pedagogically reasonable. The same applies to the older books by Drude [i.e., Paul Drude (1863-1906)]. As a greeting, I am sending you a little book in which I presented the theory of relativity earlier because I believe it is quite readable, and there is a picture of me inside. However, it is a picture from the time of my full strength, while now I am a white-haired old man. Now I wish you a pleasant time and fruitful studies." „Frank schrieb anerkennend über Ihren grossen Eifer, der ihm aufgefallen ist. Man kann viel von ihm lernen, weil er gescheit und klar ist; wissenschaftliche Erfindungskraft ist ihm eben weniger zuteil geworden. Sie müssen lernen, die Menschen im Einzelnen und auch sich selber nicht gar zu ernst zu nehmen. Es lohnt nicht. Das tiefe Eindringen in das Naturgesetz ist so schwierig, dass eine Generation nicht gerade viel fertig bringt. Dies merkt man aber erst, wenn man sich schon lange genug damit geplagt hat - glücklicherweise - denn wo sollte man sonst in der Jugend die Courage hernehmen? Das Lehren ist eine hübsche Sache, wenn man Talent dazu hat. Oft hat es nur die Entmutigung der Jungen zur Folge, wenn der Lehrer in die Psyche der Hörer nicht genug Einblick und Einfühlung hat. Die Universitäten sind meist schlimm in dieser Beziehung. Hüten Sie sich vor dem Reichinstein [d.i. David Reichinstein (1882-1955), den Sie ganz gut beurteilt haben. Das Merkwürdigste an ihm ist, dass er es fertig bringt, eine merkwürdig gute Meinung von sich selber zu haben - beneidenswert. Wenn Sie später Physik studieren, so lesen Sie zur Einführung die Bücher von A. Haas. Sie sind zwar nicht besonders sauber aber pädagogisch vernünftig. Dasselbe gilt auch von den älteren Büchern von Drude [d.i. Paul Drude (1863-1906)]. Ich sende Ihnen zum Gruss ein Büchlein, indem ich die Relativität früher dargestellt habe, weil ich glaube, dass es ziemlich gut zu lesen ist und weil - ein Bild von mir drin ist. es ist aber ein Bild aus der Zeit meiner Vollkraft, während ich jetzt ein weisshaariger Alter bin. Nun wünsche ich Ihnen noch eine schöne Zeit und fruchtbares Studium. […]“ The chemophysicist Reichinstein emigrated to Prague in 1933 and in 1938 to Switzerland; he was acquainted with Einstein. This edition is expanded from the 1932 version to include a chapter on 1933. In 1932, Einstein, frustrated, wrote that "my patience has come to an end" and threatened him: "If you publish this manuscript anywhere and in any way, our relationship is over forever." Reichinstein did not comply with the prohibition and used Einstein's emigration to publish his book in Prague in 1934. Der Chemo-Physiker Reichinstein emigrierte 1933 nach Prag und 1938 in die Schweiz und war mit Einstein bekannt. Gegenüber der Ausgabe von 1932 um das Kapitel über 1933 erweitert. Einstein schrieb 1932 entnervt, dass "meine Gutmütigkeit ein Ende hat", und drohte ihm: "Wenn Sie dieses Manuskript irgendwo und irgendwie veröffentlichen, dann ist es zwischen uns für immer aus." Reichinstein hat sich nicht an das Verbot gehalten und die Emigration Einsteins genutzt, um sein Buch 1934 in Prag erscheinen zu lassen..

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Typed letter signed „A. Einstein“. Princeton. 4to. 1 3/4 pp. Blind embossed letterhead. Expected folds. Some age toning.
$ 18,872 / 17.500 € (93542)

To the young aspiring Romanian physicist Melanie Serbu (1909-1979), in German. "[…] I was very happy about . . . your successful exams. With regard to the marriage proposal from the . . . private lecturer you named, I cannot allow myself to judge. In and of itself, I believe that it is better for a woman to be married. If the man is not a Jew, marriage seems risky, especially under today's conditions as differences can easily emerge afterward, originally concealed by the desire for connection.

Your idea of coming here doesn't seem to me to be advisable, especially since the mentality of the Prague area is probably much closer to you than the local people. It also has fewer difficulties from a financial point of view, and the prospect of finding a job here is not particularly good, even for real Americans. Even if you were here, you would get very little from me, because I don't teach and my time and energy is taken up to the last. I have indeed been somewhat ill in the last few months, but I am now completely recovered and able to work. Nonetheless, one is essentially finished as one approaches sixty. You can then depart with the joyful feeling that you have done your part and found fruitful paths. I am very happy that you are developing so well in Prague and that your tireless efforts have enabled you to overcome the really big obstacles presented by the unfamiliar environment and a disorderly and inadequate education. However, it would bring me particular joy if you were to truly find a like-minded companion. [...] P.S. If you have a scientific question that no one there can answer, I will be happy to provide you with an answer." „Schon lange hätte ich Ihnen geschrieben, wenn ich nicht durch eine unvorstellbare Korrespondenz beständig gehetzt wäre. - Ich habe mich sehr über Ihre erfreuliche Nachricht betreffs Ihrer Geschwister und Ihres geglückten Examens gefreut. Bezüglich des Heiratsantrages von Seiten des von Ihnen genannten Privat-Dozenten kann ich mir kein Urteil erlauben. An und für sich glaube ich, dass es für eine Frau besser ist, wenn sie verheiratet ist. Wenn der Mann kein Jude ist, erscheint eine Verheiratung - besonders unter den heutigen Verhältnissen - riskant, da sich nachträglich leicht Gegensätze herausstellen, die ursprünglich durch den Wunsch nach Verbindung verdeckt werden. Ihre Idee, hierherzukommen, erscheint mir nicht empfehlenswert, zumal Ihnen die Mentalität der Prager Umgebung erheblich näher stehen dürfte als die hiesigen Menschen. Es hat auch vom finanziellen Standpunkt aus weniger Schwierigkeiten und die Aussicht, hier eine Stelle zu finden, ist selbst für waschechte Amerikaner nicht besonders günstig. Selbst wenn Sie hier wären, würden Sie von mir sehr wenig haben, weil ich ja nicht lehre und meine Zeit und Kraft bis aufs letzte in Anspruch genommen ist. - Ich war in den letzten Monaten tatsächlich einigermassen krank, bin aber wieder völlig hergestellt und arbeitsfähig. Immerhin ist man in der Hauptsache fertig, wenn man den Sechzig näherrückt. Man kann dann in dem frohen Gefühl abfahren, dass man das Seine getan und fruchtbare Wege gefunden hat. Ich freue mich sehr darüber, dass sie sich in Prag so schön entwickeln und durch Ihr unermüdliches Streben die wirklich grossen Hindernisse haben überwinden können, welche die fremde Umgebung und eine ungeordnete und mangelhafte Vorbildung Ihnen bereitet haben. Eine besondere Freude aber wäre es mir, wenn Sie wirklich einen gleichstrebenden Gefährten finden würden. […] P.S. Wenn Sie eine wissenschaftliche Frage haben, die Ihnen dort niemand beantworten kann, so werde ich mich freuen, Sie Ihnen zu beantworten.“.

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Autograph letter signed „A. Einstein“. no place. 4to. 1 p. Minor paper loss to upper border. Some age toning and expected folds.
$ 26,960 / 25.000 € (93543)

To the young aspiring Romanian physicist Melanie Serbu (1909-1979), in German. "I believe the fundamental idea is partially correct. However, in my view, it stems from an incorrect conception of the solid body. When you deform such a body, the elastic stress forces disappear more or less rapidly with the given deformation. With constant deformation forces, a more or less pronounced flow occurs accordingly - independent of the current deformation process. The body bends very slowly. Think of solid pitch or wax, but also lead. In comparison to sufficiently rapid processes, the material behaves similarly to an ideal, i.e., non-flowing but only elastic solid body.

However, with very slowly changing loads, the flowing aspect takes precedence. I believe that the natural transition to liquids is to be sought here. The idea of liquids as easily flowing solid bodies would then suggest the existence of high-frequency transverse waves in liquids but not that they do not deform with sufficiently small deformation limits. So, I see the transition in a very different way than you do: Liquids would be solid bodies where the property of flowing far outweighs that of elastic angular deformation. I don't know if attempts have been made to generate high-frequency transverse waves in liquids, which would make the elasticity properties observable despite the predominant flowing characteristics." „Ich glaube der Grundgedanke ist teilweise richtig. Aber er geht nach meiner Ansicht von einer unrichtigen Auffassung des festen Körpers aus. Wenn Sie nämlich einen solchen deformieren, dann verschwinden die elastischen Spannungs-Kräfte bei gegebener Deformation mehr oder weniger rasch. Bei konstant gegebenen Deformationskräften tritt demgemäss ein mehr oder weniger ausgeprägtes Fliessen auf - unabhängig von dem momentanen Deformationsvorgang. Der Körper verbiegt sich ganz langsam. Denken Sie an festes Pech oder Wachs, aber auch an Blei. Genügend raschen Vorgängen gegenüber verhält sich das Ding ähnlich einem idealen, d.h. nichtfliessenden sondern nur elastischen festen Körper. Bei ganz langsam veränderlichen Belastungen aber tritt das Fliessen in den Vordergrund. Ich glaube nun, dass hier der natürliche Übergang zu den Flüssigkeiten zu suchen ist. Die Auffassung von Flüssigkeiten als leicht fliessende feste Körper würde dann erwarten lassen, dass es in Flüssigkeiten Transversalwellen von sehr hoher Frequenz gebe, aber nicht, dass sie sich bei genügend kleinen Deformationsgrenzen nicht deformieren. Ich sehe also den Übergang in ganz anderer Weise wie Sie: Flüssigkeiten wären feste Körper bei denen die Eigenschaft des Fliessens die der elastischen Angular-Deforation weit überwiegt. Ich weiss nicht ob man schon versucht hat, in Flüssigkeiten Transversalwellen von hoher Frequenz zu erzeugen, die dann die Elastizitätseigenschaften beobachtbar erscheinen liessen trotz der vorwiegenden Fliesseigenschaften. […]“.

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Typed letter signed „A. Einstein“. Princeton. 4to. 3/4 p. Age toning and paper clip impression to the upper border.
$ 15,098 / 14.000 € (93544)

To the young aspiring Romanian physicist Melanie Serbu (1909-1979), in German. "I thank you for your kind letters, from which I happily discern your cheerful disposition. By the way, it is not entirely clear from your communications whether you received and understood my letter on the unified treatment of the mechanics of the solid and liquid states. If this is not the case, I am happy to write to you about it again. It is undoubtedly an interesting area of work for a dissertation, even in the event that the relevant ideas are not fundamentally new." „Ich danke Ihnen für Ihre freundlichen Briefchen, aus denen ich gerne Ihre frohe Gemütsverfassung erkenne.

Es geht übrigens aus Ihren Mitteilungen nicht klar hervor, ob Sie meinen Brief über die einheitliche Behandlung der Mechanik des festen und flüssigen Zustandes erhalten und verstanden haben. Sollte es nicht der Fall sein, so will ich Ihnen gerne noch einmal darüber schreiben. Es ist zweifellos ein interessantes Arbeitsgebiet für eine Dissertation, selbst in dem Falle, dass die betreffenden Gedanken im Prinzip nicht neu wären. […]“.

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Typed letter signed „A. Einstein“. Princeton. 4to. 1 p. Blind embossed letterhead.
$ 12,941 / 12.000 € (93545)

To the young aspiring Romanian physicist Melanie Serbu (1909-1979), in German. „One is always mistaken when believing that others are significantly more concerned with one than they are; almost everyone is predominantly occupied with themselves. I know Professor Franck very well. He has a great sense of humor, and you may have engaged or triggered this sense through your behavior. However, this has no significance whatsoever, especially since he has always reported to me about you with friendly interest.

Don't let yourself be misled and maintain your impartiality. And if someone laughs at you, go ahead and laugh with them. In your penultimate letter, I wasn't quite sure if you fully understood my hints regarding the transitional zone between solid and liquid. However, when the time is right, I will explain it to you more thoroughly. One would think that people who have dealt with seismic waves have been prompted to similar considerations." „Man ist immer im Irrtum, wenn man glaubt, dass Andere sich erheblich mehr mit einem beschäftigen, denn alle sind fast ausschliesslich mit sich selbst beschäftigt. Ich kenne Professor Franck sehr genau. Er hat viel Sinn für Humor und Sie mögen ihn, bezw. diesen Sinn durch Ihr Verhalten irgendwie in Funktion gebracht haben. Dies hat aber nicht die geringste Bedeutung, zumal er mir immer mit freundlichem Interesse über Sie berichtet hat. Lassen Sie sich nicht irre machen und behalten Sie sich Ihre Unbefangenheit. Und wenn einer über Sie lacht, dann lachen Sie ruhig mit. Ich habe an Ihrem vorletzten Brief nicht genau gesehen, ob Sie meine Andeutungen betreffend des Uebergangsgebietes fest-flüssig völlig verstanden haben. Wenn es aber einmal an der Zeit ist, will ich es Ihnen besser erklären. Man sollte glauben, dass die Leute, welche sich mit den Erdbebenwellen beschäftigt haben, zu ähnlichen Betrachtungen veranlasst wurden. […]“.

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Typed letter signed „A. Einstein“. Princeton. 4to. 1/2 p. Blind embossed letterhead.
$ 15,637 / 14.500 € (93546)

To the young aspiring Romanian physicist Melanie Serbu (1909-1979), in German staying in Zurich, Switzerland. "Hopefully, your recent communication regarding tuberculosis is not accurate. However, if it turns out to be the case, I recommend that you visit my friend, Professor H. Zangger, with the enclosed letter. He is a forensic medical expert at the university and a specialist in the field of tuberculosis." „Hoffentlich ist Ihre letzte Mitteilung bezüglich Tuberkulose nicht zutreffend. Sollte es aber doch sein, so empfehle ich Ihnen, mit dem beiliegenden Brief meinen Freund, Professor H.

Zangger aufzusuchen, der gerichtlicher Mediziner an der Universität und ein Spezialist auf dem Gebiete der Tuberkulose ist. […]“.

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Typed letter signed „A. Einstein“. Princeton. 4to. 1/2 pp. Blind embossed letterhead.
$ 12,941 / 12.000 € (93548)

To the young aspiring Romanian physicist Melanie Serbu (1909-1979), in German. "I am very pleased to hear from you that you have survived the terrible dangers of these years and have also retained interest and initiative. I hope that you can find a satisfying job as a teacher in your homeland because I imagine there must be a shortage of educators there. I am doing well myself, and I am deeply immersed in my work."" „Es freut mich sehr ,von Ihnen zu hören, dass Sie die furchtbare Gefahr dieser Jahre überstanden haben und dazu noch Interesse und Unternehmungsgeist bewahrt haben.

Ich hoffe, dass Sie in Ihrer Heimat eine befriedigende Tätigkeit als Lehrerin finden können, denn ich stelle mir vor, dass an Lehrkräften dort ein Mangel sein muss. Mir selbst geht es befriedigend und ich stecke tief in der Arbeit. […]“.

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Typed letter signed „A. Einstein“. Princeton. 4to. 1 1/3 pp. Blind embossed letterhead.
$ 13,480 / 12.500 € (93549)

To the young aspiring Romanian physicist Melanie Serbu (1909-1979), in German. "I received your letter dated April 7. I don't think I can advise you to carry out your resolution. The struggle for existence here is tough, and there is an overproduction of intellectual workers. Also, in these difficult times for our people, I must limit my intervention to those who are in serious need or danger. It surprised me to hear from you the view that conditions in your country will become more challenging in the coming years.

It is, after all, a rich and fertile country, much less threatened than the nations entirely dependent on the export of industrial products. I believe you will agree with me in some time." Ich erhielt Ihren Brief vom 7. April. ich glaube nicht, dass ich Ihnen raten kann, Ihren Vorsatz zur Ausführung zu bringen. Der Lebenskampf hier ist hart und ist eine Ueberproduktion an intellektuellen Arbeitern. Auch muss ich in diesen für unser Volk so schweren Zeiten mein Eingreifen auf solche beschränken, die in ernstlicher Not oder Gefahr sind. Es hat mich überrascht, von Ihnen die Ansicht zu hören, dass die Verhältnisse in Ihrem Lande sich in den nächsten Jahren schwerer gestalten werden. Es ist doch ein reiches und fruchtbares Land, das viel weniger bedroht ist als die Länder, die ganz auf den Export von Industrie-Erzeugnissen angewiesen sind. Ich glaube, Sie werden mir in einiger Zeit selbst recht geben. […]“.

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Typed letter signed „A. Einstein“. Princeton. 4to. 1/2 p. Blind embossed letterhead.
$ 16,176 / 15.000 € (93550)

To the young aspiring Romanian physicist Melanie Serbu (1909-1979), in German. "I thank you very much for your congratulations and am pleased that you are working as a teacher. You don't have to be sad about not being able to engage in your actual field. Teaching is always rewarding when one has an interest in young people. I would have liked to do it in my younger years as well but couldn't find a position. [...]" „Ich danke Ihnen sehr für Ihre Glückwünsche und bin erfreut darüber, dass Sie sich als Lehrerin betätigen.

Sie müssen nicht traurig sein darüber, dass Sie sich nicht in Ihrem eigentlichen Fach betätigen können. Das Lehren ist immer befriedigend wenn man an den jungen Menschen Interesse hat. Ich hätte es in jungen Jahren auch gerne getan, konnte aber keine Stelle finden. […]“.

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Autograph letter signed. [Berlin]. Folio. 1 p. Folded.
$ 30,195 / 28.000 € (94203)

To Hermann Anschütz-Kaempfe: „Der freundliche Brief von Ihrer Frau [Reta Stöve] und auch von Ihnen hat sehr wohlgethan und meiner Frau [Elsa Eisntein] das Vorurteil verscheucht, dass Sie ihr in irgend einer Weise übelwollen oder mich von ihr abzuziehen suchen. Man muss Frauen nehmen wie sie sind und ihnen das Leben so leicht als möglich machen – wenn nicht aus purer Gutmütigkeit, halb aus Gutmütigkeit, so doch halb aus Klugheit. Dazu haben Sie mir in freundlicher Weise verholfen. Ich komme dann sehr gern wieder nach Kiel, nur muss ich anfangs Mai zum Philoesophenkongress nach Neapel.

Das hat sich nicht vermeiden lassen, weil dort ein besonderer Tag der Rel[ativitäts]-Theorie gewidment ist. Mitte Mai kann ich aber gut nach Kiel kommen und freue mich schon darauf. Dass bei bewegter Kugelschale durch das Magnetfeld Drehmomente auf die Kugel übertragen werden, ist nicht ganz zu vermeiden, aber der dadurch erzeugte systematische Fehler kann nicht bedeutend sein, wohl nicht grösser als der durch Wasserreibung bedingte. Dagegen wird eben nichts zu machen sein. Wichtig ist, dass der Blasring schön gleichmässig ist, dass bei blosser Drehung um die Vertikale nichts derartiges auftritt. Ich arbeite fest, wurde aber von der physikalischen Muse an der Nase herumgeführt. Hoffentlich kommts besser […]“ Translated: "The kind letter from your wife [Reta Stöve] and also from you has been very comforting, dispelling any prejudice my wife [Elsa Einstein] may have had that you bear ill will towards her or seek to alienate me from her in any way. One must take women as they are and make life as easy for them as possible - if not out of pure good nature, then partly out of good nature and partly out of prudence. You have helped me in a friendly manner towards this end. I will be very happy to return to Kiel, but I must go to the Philosophy Congress in Naples at the beginning of May. This could not be avoided, as a special day dedicated to the Theory of Relativity will be observed there. However, I can come to Kiel in mid-May and look forward to it. The fact that torques are transferred to the ball due to the moving ball shell through the magnetic field cannot be completely avoided, but the systematic error thus generated cannot be significant, probably not greater than that caused by water friction. However, there will be nothing to be done about it. It is important that the bubble ring is evenly formed, so that nothing of the sort occurs with mere rotation around the vertical axis. I am working hard, but have been led astray by the muse of physics. Hopefully, it will improve [...]".

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Autograph letter signed. no place. Folio. 2 pp. Expected folds.
$ 19,950 / 18.500 € (94204)

To his former wife Mileva Marić with a postscript to his son Eduard "Tete": „Liebe Mileva! Es ist mir nie eingefallen, dir böse zu sein oder einem von Euch. Im Gegenteil habe ich das schlechte Gewissen immerzu, weil ich dir so wenig schreibe. Dass ich letzten Sommer nicht kam, war nur, weil ich zu stören fürchtete; ich glaubte, dass ihr ohne mich behaglicher mit dem jungen Besuch wäret. Das Einzige ist, dass ich mich schwer dazu bringe, mit Albert in Beziehung zu bleiben, und das nur, weil es mir gänzlich widerstrebt, zu der Schwiegertochter in irgend welche Beziehungen zu kommen.

Wie miserabel sie ist, ersieht man daraus, wie Albert in der kurzen Zeit heruntergekommen ist. Nun der gedachte Aufenthalt in Celerina. Wenn zwischen den Familien einigermassen normale Verhältnisse wären, so wäre es ganz selbstverständlich, dass Albert zu dem Schwiegersohn meiner Frau kommen könnte. So aber weiss ich nicht, ob dies ohne Erschütterungen für die schwer kranke Ilse abgehen würde. Ich kann auch dem Schwiegersohn meiner Frau nicht einfach Vorschriften machen. Wenn Albert einen wirklich freundlichen Brief an Herrn Rudolf Kayser schriebe, der mit oben ist, und ihm auch sagte, dass dem Geplagten keine Ausgaben erwachsen sollen, und Albert ohne Frau kommen wollte, so glaube ich, dass er mit aller Freundlichkeit aufgenommen würde. Sei nicht bös, dass ich so wenig schreibe. Mein Leben ist anstrengend und voll Pflichten, sodass das Private immer zu kurz kommt. Aber für Tete möchte ich immer genug Zeit haben. Ich hätte es gern, wenn er Ostern wieder hierher käme wie letztes Jahr. Hoffentlich bist du damit einverstanden. - Was Albert anlangt so hat ihn übrigens auf Zanggers Brief hin zu mir in die Wohnung eingeladen, damit er sich da erhole. Warum soll er gerade nach Celerina? Er ist doch einfach durch Arbeit bei ungenügendem Futter erschöpft. Auf diese Einladung erfolgte keine Antwort. Was denkst Du dazu? Ich dachte mir, dass Alberts Frau das nicht zulassen wird, weil sie von ihrem Standpunkt aus betrachtet nachteilige Beieinflussung befürchtet (mit Recht). Der Junge wird an seinem Fehltritt kaput[t] gehen, fürchte ich. Wir haben aber alles Mögliche gethan um ihn zurückzuhalten. […] Lieber Tete! Nur eine kurze Bemerkung zu unserer Diskussion. Du sträubst Dich gegen eine gefühlsmässige Behandlung der Frage vom Sinn des Lebens. Aber es geht nicht anders. Der Versatand kann immer nur aus Prämissen Folgerungen ableiten nach Regeln über die man sich geeignet hat. Prämissen aber kann der Verstand nicht liefern. Man kann nicht darüber nur einigen im Falle unseres Problems nur unter der Wirkung des intuitiven gefühlmässigen Urteilens, nachdem man die Thatsächlichkeiten möglichst vielseitig auf sich hat wirken lassen. Kommt man dabei zu verschiedenen Prämissen, so ist eine Einigung überhaupt unmöglich. (Aus Seins-Urteilen, bezüglich deren Übereinstimmung zwischen uns herrschen mag, können Wertungs-Urteile nicht abgeleitet werden. Ich kann also Dein Tiger-Ideal nicht logisch widerlegen).“ Translation: „It has never occurred to me to be angry with you or with either of you. On the contrary, I constantly feel guilty for not writing to you more often. My absence last summer was only because I feared I would be a nuisance; I thought you would be more comfortable with your young visitors without me. The only thing is that I find it difficult to maintain a relationship with Albert, and that's only because I am completely averse to getting involved with the daughter-in-law in any way. You can see how miserable she is from how much Albert has deteriorated in such a short time. Now, about the proposed stay in Celerina. If relations between the families were somewhat normal, it would be quite natural for Albert to come to my wife's son-in-law. However, I am not sure if this would go smoothly for the seriously ill Ilse. I cannot simply dictate to my wife's son-in-law. If Albert were to write a truly friendly letter to Mr. Rudolf Kayser, who is mentioned above, and also told him that the afflicted person should not incur any expenses, and if Albert wanted to come alone without his wife, I believe he would be warmly welcomed. Please don't be upset that I write so little. My life is demanding and full of duties, so my private life always comes up short. But I always want to have enough time for Tete. I would like it if he came back here for Easter as he did last year. Hopefully, you agree with that. - As for Albert, he was invited to my apartment after Zangger's letter to me, so he could recuperate there. Why should he go to Celerina? He is simply exhausted from work with insufficient food. There was no response to this invitation. What do you think about that? I thought Albert's wife would not allow it because she fears adverse influence from her standpoint (rightly so). I fear the boy will be ruined by his misstep. However, we have done everything possible to restrain him. [...] Dear Tete! Just a brief comment on our discussion. You resist an emotional treatment of the question of the meaning of life. But it cannot be otherwise. The understanding can only derive conclusions from premises based on rules that have been agreed upon. However, the understanding cannot provide premises. Agreement on this issue can only be reached under the influence of intuitive emotional judgment after considering the facts as comprehensively as possible. If different premises are reached, agreement is impossible. (From judgments of being, regarding which there may be agreement between us, judgments of value cannot be derived. So, I cannot logically refute your Tiger ideal).“.

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Autograph letter signed. Berlin. 8vo. 1 1/2 pp. Double sheet. Printed letterhead „Haberlandstr. 5 | Berlin W.“.
$ 21,029 / 19.500 € (94205)

To Marie Barthelts in Winterhur : „Ich erinnere mich noch ganz gut an unser Musizieren vor 29 Jahren. Seitdem hab ich viel heruntergefiedelt und auch sonst ein so merkwürdig arbeits- und ereignisreiches Leben geführt, dass das versprochene Kikeriki mir im Halse stecken geblieben ist. Es hätte Ende 1905 sein müssen. Ihr Briefchen war für mich vom schönsten, was bei diesem 50. Geburstag kam. Es wurde mir wieder alles von damals lebendig, die frohe, wenn auch harte Jugend, die guten Menschen, die fast alle aus dem Leben oder meinem Gesichtskreis weggegangen sind.

Ich selbst bin ein grauhaariger, leidender Mensch geworden, aber der frohe Sinn und die Freude am Musizieren sind geblieben. Meine Eltern sind längst tot. Ich freue mich für Sie, dass Sie Ihre Mutter haben behalten dürfen. Seien Sie mit ihr bestens gegrüsst von Ihrem alten A. Einstein“ Translation: „I remember quite well our music-making from 29 years ago. Since then, I've fiddled away a lot and led such a strangely eventful life that the promised cock-a-doodle-doo has stuck in my throat. It must have been the end of 1905. Your little letter was the loveliest thing that came for me on this 50th birthday. It brought everything back to me from those days, the joyful, albeit tough youth, the good people, most of whom have passed away or left my circle. I myself have become a gray-haired, suffering person, but the joyful spirit and the pleasure in making music have remained. My parents have long been dead. I am happy for you that you have been able to keep your mother. Please give her my best regards. Yours sincerely, your old A. Einstein“.

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German-born physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Typed letter signed. „A. Einstein“. Princeton. 4to. 1 p. Blind embossed stationery „A. Einstein, […] Princeton“.
$ 10,245 / 9.500 € (94817)

Important letter illustrating Einstein's care for his younger sister, Maya. To Dorothea Koenig in Nashville regarding the poor health condition of Einstein's sister, Maya: „Ich weiss natürlich von Maja’s alter Bekanntschaft mit Frau Glinz-Frey. Die Tatsache, dass diese keine Briefe mehr von meiner Schwester empfangen hat beruht auf deren schwerer Erkrankung (fortgeschrittene Arteriosklerose des Gehirns), welche ihr das Leben und Schreiben seit einiger Zeit unmöglich macht. Es ist sehr freundlich von Ihnen, Ihren Besuch anzubieten.

Ein solcher würde sich jedoch nicht empfehlen, da meine Schwester im Sprechen ausserordentlich behindert ist und bei Gelegenheit eines Besuches sich ihres Zustandes schmerzlicher bewusst wird als sonst. Ich wage es deshalb gar nicht, von Ihrem Briefe etwas zu erwähnen. […]“ - In February 1939, Maja Einstein emigrated to the USA and moved in with her brother Albert in Princeton. Her husband was denied entry to the USA for health reasons, so he stayed with relatives in Geneva. Maja Einstein intended to return home after the end of World War II. In 1946, she suffered a stroke; she also developed arteriosclerosis and became bedridden, preventing her from returning to Europe. The couple maintained a correspondence by letter until Maja Einstein's death. She passed away on June 25, 1951, due to pneumonia following a fractured upper arm in Princeton. Albert Einstein reported after his sister's death: "In the last few years, I read to her every evening from the finest books of old and new literature.".

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German-born physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Original photograph unsigned. no place. 147 : 193 mm.
$ 863 / 800 € (94818)

Original photograph showing Einstein and wife, Elsa as they left on trip to Germany in 1931. There is a stamp on the verso „Apr 19 1955“.

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German-born physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Typed letter signed „A. Einstein“. Knollwood, Saranac Lake. 4to. 1/2 p. Folded. Airmail paper.
$ 9,166 / 8.500 € (94980)

To the German-American musicologist Hans Rosenwald in Chicago. Einstein declined the request for an article, stating that due to his fame, „[…] jeder Auesserung von mir mehr Gewicht beigelegt wird als objektiv berechtigt und wünschbar ist […]“ - Rosenwald (1907-1988) was the editor of "Who is Who in Music," and the request was addressed to the physicist, who was also known as an excellent violinist. Rosenwald emigrated in 1936 and had been a lecturer in Chicago since 1938.

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German-born physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Autograph manuscript (fragment). No place. ¼ page. 112 x 258 mm.
$ 32,352 / 30.000 € (44184/BN30218)

Draft of most of the final paragraph of Einstein's article, "Relativity: Essence of the Theory of Relativity", published in 1948 in the American People's Encyclopedia: "als sie zwar zu einer bestimmten Theorie des Gravitationsfeldes führt, aber nicht zu einer bestimmten Theorie des Gesamtfeldes (mit Einschluss des elektromagnetischen Feldes). Der Grund liegt darin, dass dies allgemeine Feldgesetz durch das allgemeine Relativitätsprinzip allein noch nicht hinreichend bestimmt ist". - The present draft shows the original text written by Einstein in German.

Written below by a different hand is the English translation as it was finally published: "while it leads to a well-defined theory of the gravitational field it does not determine sufficently the theory of the total field (which includes the electromagnetic field). The reason for this is the fact that the general field laws are not sufficently determined by the general principle of relativity alone". - An exceedingly fine autograph, wherein Einstein implicitly states why he spent so many of his final years searching for a Unified Field Theory. Written on the address side of an envelope addressed to him. Slight damage to edges, somewhat wrinkled..

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German-born physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). A large archive of material featuring ten (1 autogr. and 9 typed) letters to Wsevolode Grünberg and a short autograph note by Einstein, an ALS by Elsa Einstein and 2 TLS by Helene Dukas. Accompanied by a large archive of Grünberg's papers, consisting of w Princeton (NJ), Peconic, New York and Saranac Lake (NY). I: Albert Einstein. 4to. 2 pp. - II: Elsa Einstein: 8vo. 2 pp. - III: Helene Dukas. 4to. 2 pp.
$ 26,960 / 25.000 € (62618/BN45770)

Grünberg, who later in life changed his name to Waldemar A. Craig, was an aeronautical engineer who developed an important design for the hydrofoil. The letters accompany a large archive of Grünberg's papers, consisting of well over 1,000 pages of material including some of his original drawings for his hydrofoil improvements, copies of his patents, (including a large dossier of declassified tests performed in the years immediately following WWI), photographs, correspondence, and other related documents and ephemera.

- Grünberg, the nephew of a close friend of Einstein, appears to have become acquainted with Albert and his second wife Elsa sometime in the late 1920s or early 1930s, if not personally, by correspondence. In an undated letter from Berlin, written sometime before 1932, Elsa Einstein commented to Grünberg: "I am assuming you are just as kind and clever as your uncle, our dear friend. My husband and I were so glad having been able doing this small favor for you. Mr. Dunne wrote a most gracious note to us from Florida. In particular I want to thank you for the delicious grapefruits [...]" and adding "Feel free to call on me anytime, if you think I could be of help. Please be sure and do". - Apparently Grünberg took her advice, and travelling to the United States in 1939 approached Einstein for an introduction to fellow engineers in the U. S. in order to demonstrate his hydrofoil designs. The two met in June 1939 at the home of Irving Lehman in Port Chester, New York. - In addition to the introduction to the American engineering community, Einstein also agreed to handle a complex inheritance matter for Grünberg. On 1 July 1939, the same day he recommended Grünberg to his American associates, he wrote to him that he had written "a most insistent letter to Mr. Plesch in which I suggested to name an arbitrator in the inheritance matter who would be agreeable to you as well as to me and who could personally communicate with Mr. Plesch and yourself". Enclosing the letter to Dr. Lewis, Einstein advised, "I cannot understand though, how you could succeed to find a position here without a valid residence permit. I urge you to carefully investigate this subject prior to making use of the enclosed letter". Einstein continued to assist Grünberg with the inheritance issue, acting as a go-between Grünberg in the U. S. and Mr. Plesch in France. - Despite some annoyances, Einstein did what he could for Grünberg both for his inheritance and his scientific pursuits - Grünberg's personal papers concern his research on his hydrofoil designs which he first developed in France. The archive includes some of Grünberg's original drawings demonstrating applications for his design as well as some manuscript calculations in his hand, some original U. S. patent certificates for several inventions, one German patent awarded to him in 1930, original photographs, likely from the early 1930s, and several magazines including Popular Science and others discussing Grünberg's work and designs. - Detailed description available upon request..

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German-born physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). 2 typed letters signed ("A. Einstein"). Princeton, NJ. 4to. 2 ff.
$ 16,176 / 15.000 € (72752/BN46795)

To Dr. Alessandro Cortese. The first letter (July 28) concerns Cortese's visit ("If convenient I suggest Wednesday afternoon"), the second (August 16) was written afterwards: "I am grateful for the informations [!] you gave me on your visit last week. The realization of your plan to establish a[n] Institute of International Studies in Rome seems to me desirable; because such an Institute could vitalize that supra-national point of view which is so important for the solution of the international problems and could reach those persons who are most influential in this respect [...]". An unsigned carbon copy is recorded at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Archival Call Number: 59-452).

buy now

Einstein, Albert

physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Typed letter signed ("A. Einstein"). 112 Mercer Street, Princeton. 20.12.1951. 4to (281 x 217 mm). ½ p. Blindstamped address. Envelope.
$ 10,245 / 9.500 € (77563/BN50013)

To Otto Juliusburger, in German. Einstein is delighted that Juliusburger has written an article about "Popper" [apparently the Austrian Jewish thinker Josef Popper-Lynkeus, in whom Juliusburger had an interest], to whom he refers as "the excellent man": "I feel that you have done Popper justice and have transmitted a vivid impression to a more distant observer". The article was evidently inscribed with a friendly reference to a visit from Einstein himself: "The added written remark on my visit touched me greatly, even if I know well that a friendly illusion lies behind it".

- Popper-Lynkeus was a wide-ranging thinker in both the scientific and social spheres: one of his most notable ideas was the proposition of a new social system in which all individuals are provided with goods of primary necessity..

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Typescript letter with six autograph lines signed ("Albert"). Peacock Inn, Princeton, NJ. 17.10.1933. 8vo. 1 p. With an autograph letter signed by Elsa on the reverse. - Includes: 3 autograph letters signed by his wife Elsa Einstein (folio and 8vo; Caputh, 21 August 1932 and no date), one with a 6-line autograph postscript signed by Albert Einstein, and a.
$ 37,744 / 35.000 € (82616/BN53798)

Intimate correspondence with Einstein's cousin Kuno Kocherthaler, director of a mining company in Spain and also an art collector. - Typing on hotel stationery on the day of his arrival in the USA as a stateless refugee, having escaped from ever-increasing persecution in Nazi Germany, Einstein thanks Kuno for a letter of his about financial matters, adding below in his own hand: "Wir kamen heute erst hier an und suchen uns in dieser exotischen Welt zurechtzufinden. Im Frühjahr um den 1. April kommen wir nach Spanien, wo ich eine Art Lehrtätigkeit auszuüben habe.

Hoffentlich sehen wir uns dort wieder einmal gemütlich [...]". - In an earlier letter of Elsa's, also regarding family investments administered by Kuno (undated but written aboard the "Oakland", probably in the port of Bremen on 10 December 1932, about to depart for a winter cruise to Pasadena via Middle America), Einstein adds a poignant note about his younger son Eduard, who suffered from schizophrenia and had recently been committed to a mental asylum in Switzerland: "Nimm bitte diese schleichende Sorge von uns; das Leben hat in letzter Zeit Schweres gebracht, da mein liebster Sohn, der Jüngere, in einer Anstalt hat untergebracht werden müssen (Geisteskrankheit) [...]". - In the final missive, possibly another postscript torn from a longer letter, Einstein gives his consent in a single word ("Einverstanden"), signing and dating: "Princeton, 9. Mai 1934 / Albert Einstein". Elsa's own letters discuss travel, finances, Albert Einstein's stay in Spa, etc. - Each sheet with marginal binder holes affecting a few letters, otherwise flawless..

buy now

Einstein, Albert

Physiker und Nobelpreisträger (1879-1955). Eigenh. Brief mit U. Princeton, NJ. 13.03.1935. ½ S. 4to.
$ 9,166 / 8.500 € (83091/BN54525)

An den polnischen Erfinder, Komponisten und Pianisten Józef Hofmann, damals Direktor des Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia: "Es ist wirklich sehr liebenswürdig von Ihnen, meiner bei dieser schönen Gelegenheit zu denken. Es würde mir in der Tat die grösste Freude machen, Rossinis lebenssprudelndes Werk nach langen Jahren wieder zu geniessen. Ich habe aber für den Abend des 24. eine Einladung angenommen und kann es nicht mehr rückgängig machen [...]".

buy now

Einstein, Albert

Physiker und Nobelpreisträger (1879-1955). Typed letter signed. Princeton, NJ. ¾ S. 4to.
$ 19,950 / 18.500 € (87366/BN57856)

To the gastroenterologist Isidor Held (1876-1947), thanking him for the gift of a book by Upton Sinclair (probably "Dragon Harvest"), "from which I see how the machinery of world politics is reflected in his brain" and looking forward with hope and trepidation to what will follow the defeat of Nazi Germany: "I am happy with the progress the Germans have made and tremble before the next chapter [...]" (transl.). - Einstein had befriended Held, an Austrian-born physician settled in New York, through their joint efforts to help scientists and doctors escape Nazi Germany.

The two men were by this time watching the collapse of Nazism and hoping that a new peaceful German leadership would emerge from the ashes of war, although Einstein here expresses his fear for the future of Europe. Held appears to have sent Einstein a copy of the latest Upton Sinclair novel, "Dragon Harvest" (1945), which was set during the period between the Munich Crisis and the Fall of Paris. It is not clear if Held had realised that Einstein and Sinclair knew each other; Einstein had contributed a preface to Sinclair's "Mental Radio" (1930), and Sinclair made Einstein a friend of his fictional hero Lanny Budd, an American socialist. - On stationery with blindstamped letterhead. Slightly spotty and wrinkled..

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Typed letter signed ("A. Einstein"). Princeton, NJ. 4to. 1 p. Signature and one handwritten correction in green ink. In German. Framed, matted and glazed (46 x 62 cm) with a photographic portrait.
$ 8,627 / 8.000 € (88929/BN58981)

To the Russian-French hydrodynamic engineer Wsevolode Grünberg in New York City, concerning a contested inheritance matter in which Einstein had reluctantly agreed to assist. From 1939, Einstein acted as a go-between for Grünberg and his friend János Plesch, an important Hungarian physician who had emigrated to England. "Concerning the inheritance matter", Einstein writes, "I regret having to report that we were not successful in getting my friend to England, as the War prevented it. Nor can I imagine that any hindrance remains to proceeding with the final settlement.

I intend once more to encourage Mr. Plesch to put everything in order. As regards your inventions, I suggest that you send them for evaluation to my friend Professor Karman at the California Institute of Technology, who is a first-class expert and has influential connections to the realm of construction and practical implementation in the field. I enclose a letter to him [...]" (transl.). - Wsevolode Grünberg was the nephew of the Russian orthodontist and collector Josef Grünberg, a close friend of both Albert Einstein, who gave him the nickname "Bolshie", and János Plesch during their time in Berlin. It appears that Einstein and his second wife Elsa had become acquainted with Wsevolode Grünberg shortly before their friend's death in 1932. Travelling to America in 1939, Grünberg approached Einstein for an introduction to fellow engineers in the U.S. and help with his inheritance issue back in Europe. The two men met in June 1939 at the home of Irving Lehman in Port Chester, New York, and Einstein subsequently did what he could for Grünberg. In the early 1940s, Grünberg's important hydrofoil designs were used by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) to build a seaplane model that was successfully tested at Langley, VA. Ironically, the classification of the project prevented the French citizen Grünberg from seeing the results of the tests until years after the war. Grünberg later became a U.S. citizen, changing his name to Waldemar A. Craig. - Traces of folds. On Einstein's embossed Princeton stationery..

buy now

Einstein, Albert

Physiker und Nobelpreisträger (1879-1955). Typed letter signed (“A. Einstein”). Princeton, NJ. 1 S. 4to.
$ 10,245 / 9.500 € (90395/BN59911)

To Helene Katzenstein, the widow of Einstein's close friend and sometime sailing companion, the Berlin surgeon Moritz Katzenstein (1872-1932): "I deeply feel what a difficult time you are having under the present circumstances. And I shall gladly do anything to rescue you from this unsatisfactory and depressing situation. I myself have experienced at close quarters what trouble people can create for each other in everyday life when bound together within such a restricted space. Assume as philosophical a stance as you can and remember that a leopard cannot change his spots for all the sharpness of his claws [...]". - On stationery with printed letterhead; traces of folds.

buy now

Einstein, Albert

Physiker und Nobelpreisträger (1879-1955). Printed lettercard with 5 autograph lines signed. Princeton, New Jersey. 1 S. Qu.-kl.-8vo. Mit ms. adr. Kuvert.
$ 13,480 / 12.500 € (91291/BN60299)

To the Swiss jurist and women's rights activist Elisabeth Nägeli (1897-1988) in response to her birthday greetings: "Freundlichen Dank für Ihre Mitteilungen, die alte Zeiten lebendig werden lassen. Ein alter Zigeuner hat es in dieser Beziehung nicht leicht [...]" ("Thank you kindly for your communications, which revive old times. These things are never easy for an old gypsy like myself [...]"). - From a prestigious old Basel private collection. Perfectly preserved.

buy now

Einstein, Albert

Physiker und Nobelpreisträger (1879-1955). Typed letter signed ("A. Einstein"). Princeton, NJ. ½ S. 4to.
$ 9,166 / 8.500 € (91349/BN60384)

To the Berlin-born film editor Viktor Palfi, the son of the long-time director of the Kurfürstenoper and brother of the German-American photographer Marion Palfi, who contacted him with a request from the actor Curt Bois, who wanted to return to Europe from from his American exile: "I understand very well what Mr Bois wants, but I do not see what I can do [...]". - On headed paper; traces of folding.

buy now

Einstein, Albert

Physiker und Nobelpreisträger (1879-1955). Typed letter signed with 8 autograph words inserted. Princeton, NJ. 1 S. 4to.
$ 23,725 / 22.000 € (91386/BN60441)

To the German-American mathematician Ernst Gabor Straus. Einstein refers to a work he has just written in which he resolves the equations of the gravitational field issues from Bianchi's identities; he also congratulates Straus on a beautiful mathematical discovery and invokes by comparison the proof of transcendence of numbers that the latter had simplified. - An assistant to Einstein from 1944 to 1948, Ernst Gabor Straus detected a computational error in one of Einstein's works and, in order to correct it, wrote a paper with him in 1946 entitled "A Generalization of the Relativistic Theory of Gravitation".

In 1949, having left his position with Einstein at Princeton University, he published "Some Results in Einstein's Unified Field Theory". The two scientists remained in a working relationship afterwards. - On headed paper; perfectly preserved..

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Typed letter signed "A. Einstein". Princeton. 4to. 1 p. In German. Together with an autograph letter signed by Elsa Einstein and a letter by Max Gottschalk. Both 4to. 1 p. In French.
$ 16,176 / 15.000 € (91432/BN60561)

To a high-ranking Belgian official named Costermann, asking him to renew the passports of his stepdaughter Margot and her husband Dimitri Marianoff: "I am writing you on behalf of my daughter Margot Marianoff and her husband Dr. Dimitri Marianoff. Both are holders of a Belgian foreigner's passport which they obtained last spring thanks to your obliging kindness. My daughter lived with us in Coq-sur-Mer but is currently nursing her gravely ill sister in Paris. She and her husband are stateless, the latter is Russian by birth.

I would appreciate it greatly if you would renew the passports, especially as my daughter is the student of a Belgian sculptor at Bruges" (transl.). - Apparently, the letter was not sent directly to Costermann but was forwarded by the escape agent Max Gottschalk. His letter to the "Director General" is dated 7 May 1934 and accompanied Einstein's letter from 23 April with a further plea to treat the request favourably without delay. - Elsa Einstein's letter from 22 May 1933 to a "Director", very likely the same Costermann, concerns the original foreigner's passport for Margot. Elsa announces that Margot will arrive in Brussels the following day and contact the recipient directly. - Albert and Elsa Einstein were in the U.S. when the Nazis seized power in Germany in February 1933. As they could not return to their home in Potsdam, they sailed to Antwerp in March 1933, immediately renounced their German citizenships, and rented a small villa in Le-Coq-sur-Mer (De Haan) near Bruges, where Margot and her husband joined them. As early as September 1933, Albert and his wife emigrated to the U.S.; Margot and Dimitri would follow them in 1934 after the death of Margot's elder sister Ilse Einstein from tuberculosis. - Following the early death of her mother in 1936, Margot Einstein stayed with her father-in-law in Princeton, studied sculpture, and would live in the family home until her own death in 1986. Little is known about her marriage to Dimitri Marianoff. The couple had married in Berlin on 29 November 1930, much to the displeasure of Albert and Elsa, who distrusted their son-in-law; indeed, Marianoff turned out to be a Russian spy. The marriage probably ended soon after their arrival in the U.S. Marianoff profited from his previous close relationship to the world's most famous physicist by publishing a memoir "Einstein. An Intimate Study of a Great Man" in 1944. - On stationery with typed letterhead of Einstein's first address in Princeton: "2, Library Place". With an official note "Passeport Etr." in ink and a contemporary pencil translation into French. Minimally creased, two minor tears to the left margin and one to the lower margin. - The letter by Elsa Einstein shows three tears and staple holes. The letter by Gottschalk bears an official note "M. Marianoff et Gottschalk le 8.5.34" in ink and "T.U." (possibly "tâche urgent") in crayon and a minor tear..

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Guestbook signature. Berlin. 4to (178 x 220). 1 leaf (2 pp.). Collection of 34 signatures.
$ 8,088 / 7.500 € (95036/BN62349)

Albert Einstein's autograph, confidently penned as "A. Einstein, Berlin", appears among a collection of academic signatures. Following the handwritten title, "Gathering of Harvard men of Berlin on the occasion of congratulating Ambassador Sackett on the degree of Doctor Honoris Causa conferred on him by the University of Tübingen on April 25, 1932", the signatures range from 13 April to 7 May, with Einstein's undated but placed chronologically between April 14th and 16th. 1932 was Einstein's final full year living in Berlin; following the increasing restrictions on Jewish Germans and the seizure of his property, he would emigrate to America in 1933.

- The signatures which accompany Einstein's are all of his fellow academics, most of whom are American. Though the American ambassador, Frederic M. Sackett, was himself an alumnus of Harvard Law, Einstein's future lay at the university associated with the name signed after his, a G. Floyd Parker who had graduated from Princeton in 1919. - A clear Einstein autograph in an interesting academic context. Hint of edgewear; signature bright and clean..

buy now

Einstein, Albert

Physiker und Nobelpreisträger (1879-1955). Typed letter signed. Le-Coq-sur-Mer. 1 S. 4to.
$ 15,098 / 14.000 € (95394/BN62866)

Writing to the Home Office in support of Lisa Einstein's initiative to remain in England: "Miss Einstein is the daughter of a distinguished man, one of the finest doctors in Stuttgart. She has studied medicine for two years and is forced by the measures against German Jews to give up her studies. She therefore wishes to begin training as a nurse. This career path, too, is closed to her in Germany by the new regulations. Guy's Hospital of London has declared itself willing to give her further training when she will have received permission to stay in England for the necessary period [...]" (translated).

- Traces of folds; slight damage to edges and in the centrefold. Accompanied by a contemporary English translation..

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Typed letter signed ("A. Einstein"). Princeton. 4to (212 x 278 mm). ½ page. In German.
$ 16,176 / 15.000 € (95459/BN62957)

To Edward Cushing, writing in support of the Austrian educator Eugenie Schwarzwald (1872-1940), founder of the "Schwarzwaldschule" for young women, after her assets were seized by the Nazis. In response to a prior letter from Mr. Cushing, Einstein writes: "I personally feel great respect and warm sympathy for Mrs. Schwarzwald. However, since I lead a rather isolated life, I have few personal acquaintances and no knowledge of people who could be approached [...] If you should learn about such people from your American friends, I should be very glad to write to them.

Also, I should be able to make a modest contribution myself [...]" (transl.). - This letter relates to Mrs. Eugenie Schwarzwald, a progressive Austrian philanthropist who founded the innovative Schwarzwald school to educate Austrian girls. She was forced to leave Austria due to her Jewish ancestry; her assets were seized by the National Socialists, and the Schwarzwald schools were forcibly closed. Edward Cushing began the "Schwarzwald fund" to support her financially after the seizure of her assets, and in conjunction with the American journalist Dorothy Thompson, rallied for their intended emigration to America - likely referenced here..

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Photograph signed ("A. Einstein 1947"). No place. 176 x 128 mm, annotated in pencil on verso: "Albert Einstein pl credit Lotte Jacobi 2299-2".
$ 37,744 / 35.000 € (95460/BN62958)

A contemplative pose of Einstein in his famous leather jacket, holding his pipe, taken by Lotte Jacobi during the 1938 photo session she undertook with the theoretical physicist for Life magazine.

buy now

Einstein, Albert

deutsch-schweizerisch-amerikanischer Physiker (1879-1955). Maschinenschr. Brief mit eigenh. Unterschrift. Princeton, New Jersey. 4to. ¾ p. Blindgepr. Briefkopf.
$ 12,941 / 12.000 € (78417)

An den Wissenschaftler Dr. Gabriel Segall in Los Angeles: „[…] Der Eindruck den Sie von Professor Roth empfangen haben, deckt sich genau mit dem meinigen. Ich hätte es kaum gedacht, dass in unserer jüdischen Intelligentsia solche Mediocritäten Erfolg haben können. Als er mich besuchte, habe ich ihn ordentlich aufgezogen; er hat es aber nicht gemerkt. Im allgemeinen ist aber das Niveau an unserer Universität bedeutend besser, Gottseidank. Bei dem Besuch ist der Zweifel in mir aufgetaucht, ob die ,gesicherte Heimstätte’ wenn der übrig bleibende Rest von uns je eine solche erlangen könnte – nicht eine ähnliche Brutstätte von Philistertum erzeugen würde, wie wir das in der Atmosphere der gesicherten Gojim so oft vor die Augen bekommen.

[…]“.

buy now

Einstein, Albert

Physiker und Nobelpreisträger (1879-1955). Autograph letter signed ('A. Einstein') to [Emil] Orlik. ohne Ort. 8vo. 1 p. Bleistift.
$ 16,176 / 15.000 € (86524)

Recommending a young sculptor. Einstein asks Orlik to receive a certain Herr Kanders: 'He is coming on account of a young sculptor (24 years old), who to us (also Margot) seems to be quite good'. The recipient, Emil Orlik (1870-1932), was an artist, born in Prague but resident in Berlin from 1905 onwards.

buy now

Einstein, Albert

Physiker und Nobelpreisträger (1879-1955). 2 maschinenschr. Briefe mit eigenh. Unterschrift. Princeton. 4to. 2 pp. Bliindgeprägter Briefkopf. Faltspuren; an den Rändern mit kleinen Perforierungen.
$ 37,744 / 35.000 € (89495)

An den Schriftsteller Hans Margolius (1902-1984) in Florida über Ansichten von Kant, Schiller und Spinoza über Ethik und Aberglauben: „Ich danke Ihnen herzlich für Ihr Büchlein mit den feinsinnigen Aphorismen über ethische Werte. Ich bin davon überzeugt, dass dies Werkchen die Publikation verdient, da es geeignet ist, Manchem Trost und neuen Lebensmut zu bringen, ohne zum Opium des Aberglaubens seine Zuflucht zu nehmen. Was ich an dem Büchlein als Beschränkung empfinde das ist, dass es den Blick ängstlich abwendet von den Abgründen und Klüften, die nun einmal in jedem zwei- und vierbeinigen Wesen unleugbar vorhanden sind und sich nicht durch ignorieren beseitigen lassen.

Man muss den Mut haben, die Dinge in ihrer Nackheit zu sehen und zu verstehen, um ein ganzer Mensch sein zu können. Spinoza hat gezeigt, dass man dies vollbringen kann. Es müsste Einer kommen, der ihn in schlichter, einfache Sprache neu erstehen liesse. Vielleicht sin Sie der Mann. […]“ Im Brief von 1950: „[…] Sie haben die Unterscheidung zwischen der ethischen Tat bezw. Zielsetzung einerseits und dem Gefühlsmotiv, das zur Tat bezw. Wertung führt andererseits, hübsch ausgeführt. Der Gedanke selbst ist natürlich nicht neu. So ist z.B. Kand drolligerweise so weit in der objectiven Auffassung des Ethischen gegangen, dass er eine Tat nicht als ethisch wertvoll anerkennt, wenn sie unmittelbar einem elementaren Gefühl (z.B. Mitleid) entspringt; er lässt als legitime gefühlsmässige Basis des Ethischen nur das Pflichtbewusstsein gelten, worüber sich schon Schiller lustig gemacht hat. Nach meiner Meinung ist die objective Auffassung, die dem Gegenstand der Ethik angemessens. Die ethische Tat veranlassende emotionelle Situation gehört eigentlich nicht zur Ethik sondern zu Psychologie. […]“.

buy now

Einstein, Albert

German physicist and Nobel laureate (1879-1955). Typed letter signed „A. Einstein“. Princeton. 4to. 1 p. Blind embossed letterhead.
$ 15,637 / 14.500 € (93547)

To the young aspiring Romanian physicist Melanie Serbu (1909-1979), in German living now in Zurich, Switzerland. "I believe that the concerns of colleague Wenzel are entirely justified. What I wrote to you was just an insight, casually expressed without knowledge of the relevant specialized literature. Of course, I also don't have the time to engage with this literature and can, therefore, take no responsibility for the matter. However, it would probably be best to choose the topic of the dissertation in line with a colleague there.

This way, you can be sure that the work will be accepted if it is completed to his satisfaction, whereas otherwise, you might risk expending a lot of effort in vain." „Ich glaube, dass die Bedenken des Kollegen Wenzel durchaus berechtigt sind. Was ich Ihnen schrieb, war nur ein apercu, leichthin ohne Kenntnisse der einschlägigen Spezal-Literatur geäussert. Ich habe natürlich auch nicht Zeit, mich mit dieser Literatur zu befassen und kann deshalb in der Sache keinerlei Verantwortung übernehmen. Es dürfte aber wohl das Beste sein, das Thema der Dissertation in Einklang mit einem dortigen Kollegen zu wählen. Dann sind Sie sicher, dass die Arbeit angenommen wird, wenn sie zu dessen Befriedigung vollendet wird, während Sie sonst riskieren würden, eine Fülle von Arbeit nutzlos aufzuwenden..

buy now

sold

 
Einstein, Albert

Ms. Brief m. e. U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), physicist and Nobel laureate. TLS (“A. Einstein”). Princeton, 31 Dec. 1938. 4°. 1 ½ pp. on 2 ff. With addendum (see below). – To Salomon [!] Goldman: “I have just read your book with the greatest interest. It contains the true fire of a prophet; it mercilessly holds a mirror up to the contemporaries, Jews and Goyim alike. Your upright courage and optimism are a pleasure to behold in a man to whom nothing human remains foreign, not in scripture and not in world otherwise. Almost everything is spoken from my soul. I admit that I entertain lesser hopes for salvation through a union of the majority of Jews in a single country or even a state; no matter how we may think about this, the necessity of earnest striving for such a solution today is unavoidable. One must not deliberate whether our people in concentration would perhaps develop those dangerous and hideous weaknesses which we despise in our enemies today. I feel you do not afford the Greeks the friendliness and veneration which they deserve. I believe that we Jews have been strongly and continuously influenced by them in a positive sense due to our common love for the spiritual world, for independence in life and in thought. Your hymn to ‘Romance of a People’ is also good for those who have not witnessed that kitsch on stage; ‘Eternal Road’ was worse still, in spite of Werfel’s fine text. It is dangerous to transfer this great matter to the stage – especially as a whole. I particularly enjoyed the polemical articles ‘Jews and Christians’, ‘The Function of the Rabbi’, ‘Rabbis and Rabbis’; of immediate importance were ‘The Goal of Judaism’ and ‘Can Religion Change!’ [...] P. S. I beg an answer regarding the excellent Max Brod.” – On stationery with printed letterhead. – Includes: Jacob J. Weinstein: Solomon Goldman. A Rabbi’s Rabbi. New York, KTAV Publishing House, 1973. xiii, (1), 295, (3) pp. With several illustrated plates. Original cloth with giltstamped title to spine and original dustjacket. Large 8°.


Einstein, Albert

Ms. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), physicist and Nobel laureate. TLS (“A. Einstein”). Princeton, 3 March 1939. 4°. 1 p. – To Solomon Goldman: “In my telegram, I added the passage ‘IMMIGRATION ISSUE SOLVABLE ONLY BY COMPROMISE BETWEEN BOTH NATIONALITIES’ for the following reason: what we must fear, principally, is disenfranchising and plundering the people and classes who currently represent the construction efforts. This danger must be sought to be avoided first and foremost. That it is a serious one is beyond doubt. If the revision of this constitutional issue is burdened by inflexible constraints regarding immigration, then this threatens not only immmigration, but also the entire current wealthy class. This is why with heavy heart I wrote the last passage. Personally, I do not think it wise to omit it. Of course I see the possibility that you have a clearer view of the situation, and I authorize you to omit the passage if you are prepared to take full responsibility. I have no objection to a dinner being held for my 60th birthday – provided that a practical end can be reached by it. However, I will not be able to appear in person, as I have had to abstain from appearing in other very similar cases and it would be ludicrous to make an exception on this of all occasions [...]”. – On stationery with embossed letterhead.


Einstein, Albert

Ms. Brief m. e. U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), physicist and Nobel laureate. TLS (“A. Einstein”). Princeton, 17 May 1939. 4°. ¾ p. – To Solomon Goldman: “Surely you have heard of the important poet Arno Nadel, who is also known as a collector of Jewish folksongs and as a composer. He is currently the cantor of the Jewish parish in Berlin and will be killed by the Nazi brutalities within a short period of time unless he can be saved. I include a few biographical notes about him. Do you not think that there is a possibility of finding a place for this deserving man here, for example as a cantor? [...]” – On stationery with embossed letterhead; insignificant damage to edges; without the mentioned notes.


Einstein, Albert

Portraitphotographie m. e. U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), Physiker und Nobelpreisträger. Originalportraitphotographie mit e. Widmung und U. U. O., 1929. 236:176 mm auf etwas größerem Trägerkarton. – Schönes S/W-Portrait (Kniestück im ¾-Profil) mit e. Widmung am Trägerkarton für „S. Fischer, dem erfolgreichen Förderer literarischen Schaffens zum siebzigsten Geburtstage Albert Einstein. 1929“. – Weiters mit e. Signatur der Photographin Gerty Simon in Bleistift. – Der Karton mit einigen kl. Knickfalten, das Portrait bis auf einige kleine Stichlöchlein unversehrt.


Einstein, Albert

Ms. Brief m. e. U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), Physiker und Nobelpreisträger. Ms. Brief mit e. U. (A. Einstein“). Knollwood, Saranac Lake N. Y., 15. August 1944. ¾ S. Gr.-4°. – An den Violinisten und Komponisten George Perlman (1897–2000): „It was extremely kind of you to send me the two beuatiful [!] Vivaldi Concertos. I consider Vivaldi one of the greatest musicians of all times and your edition as a real achievement of lasting value [...]“. – Auf Briefpapier mit gepr. Briefkopf.


Einstein, Albert

E. Albumblatt mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), physicist and Nobel laureate. AQS ("A. Einstein"). N. p. o. d. [probably March 1929]. ½ p. 8°. – "Herr, verzeiht mir das Plagiat, | Das ich Ihnen mausen that | Ganz beschämt schleich' ich mich fort | Lass dem Gegner nur das Wort" ("My plagiarism pray forgive | I cribbed from you, I will admit | Full of shame aside I go | And surrender to my foe"). – On the reverse of a facsimile thank-you card to his 50th-birthday felicitators. – Slightly dusty and spotty.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Brief m. U. („A. Einstein“). [Berlin, nach 1917]. 1 S. 8°. – An den namentlich nicht genannten Physiker Emil Warburg (1846–1931): „Ich komme, um mich von Ihnen zu verabschieden. Es gelang mir nämlich, die Reiseerlaubnis zu erhalten, für eine morgige Reise nach Leiden. Falls Sie mir noch etwas mitteilen bezw. auftragen wollen, bitte ich Sie, mich zwischen 2 und 3 Uhr |Nollendorf 2807 | anrufen zu wollen. Leider kann ich nun morgen nicht zum Musizieren kommen, wie verabredet war [...]“. – Albert Einstein war im September 1917 in die Haberlandstraße 5 in Berlin-Schöneberg gezogen, wo er die oben zitierte Rufnummer hatte. – Etwas gebräunt und fleckig sowie mit einem kleinem Ausriß am oberen, perforierten Rand.


Einstein, Albert

Portraitpostkarte mit e. Widmung und U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), Physiker und Nobelpreisträger. Portraitpostkarte mit e. Widmung und U. O. O. u. D. 1 S. 8°. – „Der lieben Frau Lebach herzlichen Dank | A. Einstein“). – Die Bildseite mit einer Abbildung von Morris J. Kallems Einstein-Portrait a. d. J. 1942. – Kleinere Gebrauchs- und Montagespuren.


Einstein, Albert

E. Nachschrift (fünf Zeilen) mit U. („Dein Albert“).
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), Physiker und Nobelpreisträger. E. Nachschrift (fünf Zeilen) mit U. („Dein Albert“). Princeton, 29. September 1952. 4°. – Auf einem zweiseitigen Brief seiner Stieftochter Margot (geb. 1899) an Ogden Steinhardt, den Mann seiner Cousine Alice: „Lieber Ogden! Ich höre, dass auch Du in die 70er eingehst. Ich hab mich schon tief hineingelebt und weiss, wie es ist. Man braucht den Humor immer mehr, um Löcher zuzustopfen. Jedenfalls wünsche ich Dir Gesundheit und sonst alles Gute [...]“. – Margot schreibt u. a.: „So oft waren meine Gedanken bei Dir in den letzten Wochen – wäre Albert durch eine Venen-Entzündung nicht elend gewesen – u. wir etwas in Sorge – hätte ich bei Dir angerufen. Gott sei Dank geht es ihm viel besser – er muss aber noch viel ruhen u. das Bein schonen [...]“.


Einstein, Albert

Ms. Brief mit e. U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), Physiker und Nobelpreisträger. Ms. Brief mit e. U. („A. Einstein“). Princeton, 13. März 1935. ½ S. Gr.-4°. – An den Pianisten Józef Hofmann (1876–1957), den damaligen Leiter des Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia: „Es ist wirklich sehr liebenswürdig von Ihnen, meiner bei dieser schönen Gelegenheit zu denken. Es würde mir in der Tat die grösste Freude machen, Rossinis lebenssprudelndes Werk nach langen Jahren wieder zu geniessen. Ich habe aber für den Abend des 24. eine Einladung angenommen und kann es nicht mehr rückgängig machen [...]“. – Leicht knittrig und mit einer kleinen Notiz von anderer Hand am rechten oberen Rand.


Einstein, Albert

Eigenh. Nachschrift mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), German-born physicist and Nobel laureate. Autograph quotation signed. [Coq sur Mer, summer of 1933]. Oblong 8°. ¼ p. On a picture postcard written by the writer Antonina Vallentin (1893-1957) to her daughter Irène. - Nice quote regarding Einstein's passion playing violin.


Einstein, Albert

Portraitphotographie mit eigenh. U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Nice signed 3/4 profile shot of Einstein.


Einstein, Albert

Portraitphotographie mit eigenh. Widmung und U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

A black-and-white bust portrait photograph by John Graudenz (1884-1942); with autograph dedication to "[Youra] Guller, der wunderbaren Interpretin in Dankbarkeit / Albert Einstein / 1928". - Guller's first name has been scratched out. Small creases in the right margin, near the photographer's pencil signature, otherwise in good condition.


Einstein, Albert

Ms. Brief mit eigenh. U. ("A. Einstein").
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

In German, to Manfred Hohenemser, expressing his delight that he was able to come to the U.S., thanking him for his letter, inquiring about a young physicist of the same surname and offering to recommend him, and warning that Jewish scholars cannot easily obtain a position at an American university: "Ich freue mich sehr, dass Sie die Möglichkeit gehabt haben, in die Vereinigten Staaten zu kommen [...] Können Sie mir vielleicht mitteilen, was aus dem jungen Physiker Hohenemser geworden ist, der doch sicher ein Verwandter von Ihnen ist? Wenn Sie eine Möglichkeit schaffen können, ihn herüber zu bekommen, würde ich ihn gerne empfehlen. Freilich ist es für jüdische Gelehrte auch hier sehr schwierig, an einer Universität anzukommen [...]". - Mounted to a sheet of black paper cut to size, vertical fold touching end of signature; somewhat wrinkled.


Einstein, Albert

Typed letter signed ("A. Einstein").
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

To one of his cousins, recommending him to visit Erich Marx, an engineer from Karlsruhe (not identical with the German physicist of that name, the inventor of the "Marxsche Röhre", who emigrated into the United States in spring 1941): "[...] He is also in a rather modest situation, but he knows this country, and perhaps he has some ideas or personal connections which could be helpful to you [...] Unfortunately my affidavits have always been turned down lately because I have submitted too many already. Perhaps it would be better if your son quotes me as a reference and informs the person in question that I guarantee his reliability [...]" (translated from the German original). - On stationery with embossed letterhead.


Einstein, Albert

Ms. Brief mit eigenh. U. (“A. Einstein”).
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

In German, to Helene Katzenstein, widow of Einstein's close friend and sometime sailing companion, the Berlin surgeon Moritz Katzenstein (1872-1932): "I deeply feel what a difficult time you are having under the present circumstances. And I shall gladly do anything to rescue you from this unsatisfactory and depressing situation. I myself have experienced from close-up what trouble people can create for each other in everyday life when bound together within such a restricted space. Assume as philosophical a stance as you can and remember that a leopard cannot change his spots for all the sharpness of his claws [...]". - On stationery with printed letterhead; traces of folds.


Einstein, Albert

E. U. auf Porträtdruck
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), German Physicist and Nobel Laureate (1921). Signed etching, 7.25 x 9.5 inch, Albert Einstein, n. p. n. d. A head and shoulders motif of Einstein. Signed on the lower white border. Also signed by the artist „J. J. Muller“ in pencil.


Einstein, Albert

Portraitphotographie m. e. U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), German Physicist and Nobel Laureate (1921). SP, 5 x 7 inch, no place, [19]54, one page 8vo. Nice portrait of the elderly Einstein sitting in a chair on his desk.


Einstein Albert

E. U. in "The Meaning of Relativity"
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), dt. Physiker, Begründer der Relativitätstheorie, Nobelpreis 1921 (verliehen 1922). The meaning of Relativity. The Third edition (revised) including the Generalization of Gravitation Theory. Princeton, Princeton Univ. Press, 1950. Mit e. U. Einstein auf dem Vorsatzblatt. Vorsatz lichtrandig. Umschlag leicht fleckig; an einer Stelle eingerissen.


Einstein, Albert

Brief m. e. U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), dt. Physiker, Begründer der Relativitätstheorie, Nobelpreis 1921 (verliehen 1922). Mit gedrucktem Briefkopf „Prof. Dr. Albert Einstein“. Faltspuren. Brief m. e. U., Berlin, 26. April 1927, eine Seite gr.-4°. An das Ehepaar Dernburg mit der Absage einer Einladung: „[…] Ich liege an einer schweren Herzkrankheit darnieder und halte es für ausgeschlossen, dass ich bis zum 6. Mai mit meiner Frau Ihrer liebenswürdigen Einladung Folge leisten kann […]“ – Im selben Jahr beginnen Albert Einstein und Niels Bohr ihre intensive Auseinandersetzung über die Grundlagen der Quantentheorie. Beiliegt: 1 Porträtfotografie, 10 x 15 cm.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), physicist and Nobel laureate. ALS “Papa”. Oxford, 30 May 1933. 4°. 1 ½ pp. Folded; traces of paper-clip. In German. To his son Hans Albert (1904–1973), endeavoring to explain his actions after an argument, and regarding his younger son Eduard (“Tetel”, 1910–1965), who had just suffered a nervous breakdown: “[…] I see now that I actually did you an injustice by misjudging the motives of your – nevertheless wicked – behavior toward me. The principal motive was the feeling of undeserved rejection and the need to take some sort of revenge. This, however, is quite erroneous on your part. My life is more strongly burdened with strain and duty than that of average people, and therefore one cannot place the same demands upon me as on them. It is not true that the women who live with me enjoy any privileges in this regard. And even if it were so it would be petty-minded to give it much thought. For we are men and must stand on our own feet and thus stand secure. – But in Zurich I felt that in spite of everything you have still remained the innocent boy of earlier days, and I enjoyed your company and also the conversation with you. I hope that you will also be successful in your independent work. But I know how difficult this field is, and human matters must always come first. I am not worried, by the way, that you will be consumed by ambition, the passion with undoubtedly gnawed away at our poor Tetel. His condition is bad, as he shows signs of an inward coarsening which contrasts with his former personality. At least I have the comforting feeling that he suffers less than he used to […]”. – Einstein’s second son Eduard was diagnosed with schizophrenia in 1930.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), physicist, Nobel laureate. ALS “Albert”. “Kaputh”, 4 July 1929. Folio. 1 ½ pp. On the reverse of his printed stationery. In German. Biographically important letter to his first wife Mileva Einstein-Maric (1875–1948), to whom Einstein was married from 1903 to 1919. At first, Einstein discusses a mortgage on Mileva’s house. He also mentions his son Eduard (1910–1965, “Tetel”), his new summer house at Caputh near Potsdam, and his passion for sailing: “[…] I quite agree with you. It would be better for tax reasons if you were encumbered with the house. So I would try to find out whether the interest rate of 6 % is not too high for Switzerland. If not, I would agree; if so, we could try to have the mortgage passed into other hands. My health has definitely improved, so that I can go sailing again. I now spend my entire summer at Kaputh in the country. So when Tetel comes he will find everything very nice and relaxing. The house isn’t finished yet, but we are staying at a temporary apartment right on the waterside. The new boat which I was given by rich finance people for my 50th birthday is wonderful, so fine that I am a little worried over the responsibility. I work a lot, but the evil spirit leads me in circles, so that I am still uncertain whether my new theory of electricity is any good or not [...] I hope that nature won’t be too strenuous for him. I think it would be an excellent idea for him to get away from home soon and learn to find his way about in life. I am telling you this because I can imagine that you [...] are strongly opposed to it. But think of Albert’s fate. Perhaps he would have fared better if he had gotten to know the world early. It would be especially good for him to go to England for a while to learn the language. What do you think?”. – Einstein applied for the construction plans for his house in Caputh in May 1929; these were granted on June 21, and construction of the house in Waldstrasse 7 began. During this time, the Einsteins rented an apartment in Potsdamer Strasse in Caputh. The house was finished soon, and Einstein could move in as early as September 1929. He was to live there until 1932. With the “Tümmler”, the boat mentioned, Einstein often used to sail on Lake Templin. – His second son, Eduard, was diagnosed with schizophrenia in 1930.


Einstein, Albert

E. Postkarte mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), physicist and Nobel laureate. APcS “A. Einstein“. Berlin, 1 March 1915. 1 p. Creased. In German. To his first wife, Mileva Einstein-Maric (1875–1948) in Zurich, to whom Einstein was married between 1903 and 1919, regarding financial affairs after their separation: “[…] By the same mail I have instructed the Kanton bank to transfer the obligations and the savings account into your name. I request you to do the same with the papers in Prague. The little children’s pictures gave me great pleasure. I thank you for them. You will receive the curtains […].” – In 1914, Einstein moved to Berlin with his family, where he was offered the post of director of the projected Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Physics. In June 1914 the couple separated; Mileva returned to Zurich with the children.


Einstein, Albert

E. Postkarte mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), physicist and Nobel laureate. APcS. “Yours, Albert Einstein“. Berlin, 15 Nov. 1915. 1 p. Creased. In German. To his first wife, Mileva Einstein-Maric (1875–1948) in Zurich, to whom Einstein was married between 1903 and 1919: “[…] Your letter gave me sincere pleasure because it shows me that you do not plan to sabotage my relationship with the boys. I, for myself, tell you that this relationship forms the most important part of my private life. In future I will arrange everything that concerns them with you, if you confirm your letter. I plan to go to Switzerland around the end of the year to see at least Albert outside Zurich and to spend a few days with him. Have you any special wishes concerning the place? […]” – In 1914, Einstein moved to Berlin with his family, where he was offered the post of director of the projected Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Physics. In June 1914 the couple separated; Mileva returned to Zurich with the children.


Einstein, Albert

E. Postkarte mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), physicist and Nobel laureate. APcS. Berlin, 26 April 1918. 1 p. In German. To his first wife, Mileva Einstein-Maric (1875–1948) in Zurich, to whom Einstein was married between 1903 and 1919, regarding details of their divorce: “[…] I give in for the children because I have now come to the conviction that you want to treat matters in a conciliatory way. It is clear that I would never let the children travel here on their own in times as these. Perhaps, however, you yourself will later take the view that you can send me the boys here without any misgivings. Meanwhile, I shall see them in Switzerland. Possibly the agreement could stipulate something like ‘outside the place of residence of Prof. Einstein’, rather than ‘in Switzerland’; I do not insist on this point, by the way. I hope to satisfy you to such a degree that you will feel urged to be similarly accommodating […]”. – Einstein and his wife had been living in separation since July 1914; they divorced on 14 Feb. 1919.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), physicist and Nobel laureate. ALS. N. p. o. d. („Thursday“). 8°. 1 p. In German. To his first wife, Mileva Einstein-Maric (1875–1948), to whom Einstein was married between 1903 and 1919. Einstein announces that after long consideration he has decided to leave the children in Kiel and travel to Geneva: “[…] After much reflection we finally did prefer to leave Tete in Kiel. The day after tomorrow, both the boys will go there; I shall be off to Geneva. Around the 1st of August (30, 31 or 1) I will come to you in Zurich, if you are there (if not, then write me: Commission de la coopération intellectuelle, Société des Nations, Geneva). Then I will go directly to Kiel and see the boys. Albert is a splendid fellow; Tete is clever, but of course still a bit of an embryo […]”. – With a letter by Einstein’s son Eduard to his mother on the reverse: “[…] I have given up sending you a poem every time; it is incredibly hot, and the heat exercises a most detrimental effect upon my brain […] On Saturday I shall be going to Kiel with Albert, while Papa will be going to Geneva at the same time. He will then be catching up with us in Kiel as soon as possible, so that we shall have almost 2 weeks together. During his trip he probably will also come to Zurich and visit you. Your will thus be alone for quite some time, but you can comfort yourself with the thought that it is also rather nice to be rid of us for a while”. – Regarding a sailing cruise with his father: “I have been sailing several times now and can now even steer a little by myself”.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), physicist, Nobel laureate. ALS. N. p. o. d. [early 1920s]. Large 4°. ½ p. To his first wife Mileva Einstein-Maric (1875–1948), to whom Einstein was married from 1903 to 1919. Einstein reports on a visit by his two sons: “[...] We’ll be spending a few for days of gaiety together before Adu [his son Hans Albert] must slip back into his leather breeches. The children are very nice and well-bred. Today we went sailing with my tiny boat. I am sorry to hear that the matter about the house is still unresolved. But if it goes wrong and you’d be living in your country, you certainly would be no worse off than now, not even regarding security. I am still doing scientific work with all my might, even more successfully than in many former years. An old boy such as I, after all, hasn’t got much else left in his head, apart from an enormous correspondence. This is the main reason for my having so little time for private life [...]”.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), physicist and Nobel laureate. ALS. N. p., 15 Oct. 1926. Folio. 1 p. In German. To his first wife, Mileva Einstein-Maric (1875–1948), to whom Einstein was married between 1903 and 1919. Einstein is critical about the upcoming wedding of his son Hans Albert and mentions “a presence of parallel hereditary defects in both families”. He also intervenes on behalf of Mileva’s brother, who was taken prisoner of war by the Russians in WWI: “[…] I receive your letter after a month of absence. I was in Düsseldorf (the naturalists’ convention), then in Holland and in Kiel with Anschütz [Hermann A., the engineer; 1872–1931]. I enjoyed the pictures of the cacti. It’s a proud collection. My business has not yet permitted me to get you your ‘Empress’. Biske wasn’t there and didn’t let out as much as a peep, either. I think I missed a European-Asian attraction here. I will make the inquires about your brother via the Russian ambassador here, whom I know rather well. I include Blenler’s letter. He mentions the presence of parallel hereditary defects in both families and advises against children. Albert has said that in such a case he would exercise reason. Anschütz is still very interested in him. He says – quite rightly – that to achieve a success matching his talents in his practical profession, Albert must acquire some form and polish. To judge by his old man and lady, there’s little enough hope for that. I’d be quite content if he didn’t engage in this precarious child-production business […] I look forward to Tete’s letter. Anschütz wants him in Lautrach again next year. If he goes, I will go there, too […]”. – Hans Albert married Frieda Knecht in 1927.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), physicist, Nobel laureate.ALS “Papa”. Zurich, 31 March 1928. Large 8°. 2 pp. To his son Hans Albert (“My dear Albert”), who had asked him for help in finding a job, and about his work on an ice machine: “[...] Your letter gave me much pleasure. I, too, would very much like to have you near me, and I shall seriously try to find you a position in Berlin. The difficulty is that others will have to do this, as one cannot well recommend one’s own son. Unfortunately, I cannot visit you, as I am diagnosed with a severe heart problem (dilation of the heart with high blood pressure and a low pulse). It is unknown whether I will improve substantially. In any case I shall have to lie in bed for months. This letter, too, is written in bed. Tete has developed splendidly. I see him almost every day, but I don’t live with Mama because my wife is with me. I am glad that you will be visiting us in June. You will be our guests, but we will have to accommodate you somewhere outside our apartment. The ice machine is coming along rather nicely. The A.E.G. are very interested. We have devised three very different types, one based on evaporation of methyl alcohol through water-jet pumps, the second one an electrical mercury pump which pumps the refrigerant with the mercury by the same principle as the water-jet pumps, the third a special kind of absorption machine [...]”. – Due to overexertion, Einstein developed a heart condition in 1928 and was required to stay in bed for several months. His recovery was slow and lasted nearly a year.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), physicist, Nobel laureate. ALS. N. p., 4 June 1928. Folio. 1 p. To his first wife Mileva Einstein-Maric (1875–1948), to whom Einstein was married from 1903 to 1919, regarding their children Hans Albert and Eduard: “[...] I will be happy to have Albert examined when he comes, which will probably be next Sunday. He can get a piano from me, I can work that out all right. However, I think it would be a better idea to get him a rather ordinary, cheap affair right now, as he won’t be staying in Dortmund forever. And later I’ll give him a good instrument, and we’ll resell this one. Don’t you also think that makes sense? So just leave the money in America. Now I understand why Koppel gave me that advice. I am doing better not not yet well. I still spend most of the day in bed. On the oether hand I can live quietly without the eternal duties and determents, which greatly helps me in my scientific work. Many greetings to Tetel. So he’ll be spending this year’s vacation at Scharbeutz near Lübeck, where we have rented a villa right on the sea together with Mrs. Mendel [...] I have just received Tetel’s long letter. Unfortunately, I cannot even think of traveling alone. I’m much too ill for that. But I’m convinced that the sojourn to the pure air of the Baltic Sea would to Tetel a lot of good. It’s mild on the Baltic, quite different from the North Sea, and the treatment they give you isn’t bad at all [...]”. – Due to overexertion, Einstein developed a heart condition in 1928 and was required to stay in bed for several months. His recovery was slow and lasted nearly a year. – After finishing school, Hans Albert studied engineering at the Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH) in Zurich and for some time worked as a construction engineer in Dortmund.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), physicist, Nobel laureate. ALS. N. p., 10 July [1943]. Folio. 1 p. Folded; with punched holes. In German. To hin son Hans Albert, who apparently wanted to join the Navy: “[...] That was to be expected. It ist true that I have a sort of advisory position for the Navy. But it won’t do much good because I have only very incomplete knowledge of the actual duties and other, able young men are working on the matter together on the spot. [...] It would be better for you, too, to find a more respectable association. So we did two things: 1) phone Trenton in order to speed up your citizenship papers. If it’s in Trenton or Philadelphia, all will be dealt with quickly; but if you’ve still got the papers down with you, you’ll have to keep poking to get the papers moved on. I’ll be able to let you know the state of affairs very soon. 2) I spoke to Prof. [Oswald] Veblen, who is in the war research organization, about your case. He has agreed to take an interest in it and requires a) an extensive curriculum stating your previous activities and achievements b) a statement of the addresses of all persons who can provide information about you. If one of them can be easily reached, you can ask him to write to Veblen about you himself, but this is not a requirement [...]”. – Einstein’s son Hans Albert emigrated to the US in June 1938. He worked as a research engineer at the Clemson Agricultural Experiment Station. Afterwards, he woked (until 1947) at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.


Einstein, Albert

Brief m. e. U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. Brief m. e. U. „Papa“, Princeton, 4. Januar 1945, 1 Seite Folio. Auf blindgedrucktem Briefkopf; gelocht. An seinen Sohn Hans Albert „Adu“, dem er Auskunft über verschiedene Personen erteilt sowie über die „Greenviller Idee“, an der er gerade arbeite: „[…] Frau Israel ist eine feine Person, die ich von Deutschland her kenne. Ihr Sohn Wilfried ist im Krieg tragisch umgekommen (Flugzeug). Wenn Du sie siehst, grüsse Sie herzlich von mir. Fred Hirsch ist eine flüchtige Bekanntschaft und ich habe keine Meinung über ihn. Karman war neulich da, ist immer noch der feine Kerl, schien aber gealtert und müde. Mit der Arbeit geht’s sehr gut, indem ich nun endlich die richtige Form für die Greenviller Idee gefunden habe, nachdem ich Berge von Papier mit missglückten Versuchen vollgekritzelt habe. Es wird bald so weit sein, dass ich einen Vergleich mit den Tatsachen machen kann […]“


Einstein, Albert

Brief m. e. U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), physicist, Nobel laureate. ALS “Papa”. Saranac Lake, 3 August 1945 (“Saturday”). Folio. 2/3 p. Folded. With envelope. In German. To his son Hans Albert, regarding an experiment which he discusses in detail: “[...] I think your model is very pretty and I have now understood what it’s about. A shaft drives two bodies going back and forth [...] Now I still do not know what purpose you envisage for it. Is it meant to control the valves of a motor? Or is the body with the adjustable amplitude meant to adjust the pumping capacity for the fuel supply to a cylinder? What problem made you come up with this pretty construction? Must one not expect an uncomfortably long response time for the adjusting lever? I hope you have quite dismissed your beer-born notion of ‘Albert as a political instructor’ [...]”.


Einstein, Albert

Brief m. e. U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. Brief m. e. U. „Dein Albert”, Princeton, 7. September 1947, 1 Seite Folio. Blindgeprägter Briefkopf. An seine erste Frau Mileva Einstein-Maric (1875-1948): „[…] Ich habe heute Deinen Brief vom 3. September wegen der für die Verkaufsverhandlung nötigen Papiere erhalten und sofort an unsere Anwälte Auftrag gegeben, diese Papiere zu verschaffen und an Dich zu senden. Auch habe ich – wegen der Abwesenheit von Dr. Nathan – einen zuverlässigen Freund in New York beauftragt, dafür zu sorgen, dass die Angelegenheit nicht verschleppt wird. Den Brief an Dr. Robert Meyer muss ich diesem Briefe beilegen, da uns dessen Adresse nicht bekannt ist. Ich bin Dir dankbar, dass Du trotz der für Dich bestehenden körperlichen Schwierigkeiten die Angelegenheit soweit gebracht hast, dass das Haus verkauft wird. Hoffentlich ist es Dir gelungen, dafür zu sorgen, dass Du in Deiner Wohnung bleiben kannst. Wenn aber nicht, so wird sich auch ein Weg finden lassen. Es ist gut wenn das Geld einstweilen auf den Namen der Corporation auf einer Bank deponiert wird. Sobald wir hier wissen, wo die Verkaufssumme hinterlegt wird, werden wir dafür sorgen, dass Du das Verfügungsrecht darüber erhalten wirst. Es wird gut sein, wenn Du uns mitteilst, in welcher Form dies zu geschehen hat, damit nicht wieder formale Schwierigkeiten eintreten. Ich habe gehört, dass mein Kollege Bargmann bei Dir gewesen ist, der, bezw. dessen Frau, es freundlicherweise übernommen hat, die von Albert gewünschte Geige hierher mitzunehmen. Es sind absolut zuverlässige Leute, sodass es keiner irgendwelcher Vorsichtsmassregeln bedarf. Es tut mir leid zu hören, dass Tetels Zustand noch immer zu wünschen übrig lässt und ich nehme an, dass er noch immer in der Anstalt ist. Hoffentlich wendet es sich wieder zum Besseren, wie es ja schon oft der Fall war. – Mir geht es soweit ordentlich, wenn ich auch nicht mehr so arbeitsfrisch bin wie früher. Ich möchte nicht gern erleben, dass ich für nichts mehr gut bin, aber jeder hat es zu nehmen wie es kommt […]“ – 1930 erkrankte Eduard „Tete“ an Schizophrenie. Er starb 1965 im „Burghölzli“, einem psychiatrischen Sanatorium in Zürich.


Einstein, Albert

E. Postkarte mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Postkarte m. U., Berlin, 7. Januar 1920, 1 ½ Seiten. An den Staatsanwalt Dr. Zürcher in Zürich: „[…] Auf Wunsch meiner Frau habe ich das Geld, was ich bisher bei Herrn Karr für meine Familie liegen hatte, in Ihre Hände gelangen lassen. Hoffentlich haben Sie es erhalten. Heute schicke ich weitere 5000 M[ark] an Sie ab zu dem gleichen Zweck. Das Geld soll jetzt nur im Notfall umgewechselt werden, da das reale Wertverhältnis Mark/Franc doch erheblich grösser ist als das Kursverhältnis (11/100), sodass Umwechslung wahrscheinlich unvorteilhaft. In einigen Monaten kann ich Ihnen wieder Schweizer Geld senden, da ich im Ausland verschiedentlich etwas Geld verdienen werde. Ich zweifle sogar immer noch daran, ob ich meine Familie umziehen lassen soll. Vielleicht kann ich es doch einrichten, dass sie dort bleiben. Ich bitte Sie inständig, mich über den Stand meiner dortigen Familie so aufzuklären, dass ich weiss, was ich Zangger [Einsteins Freund, der Gerichtsmediziner u. Physiologe Heinrich Zangger; 1874-1957] in Wirklichkeit an Geld schuldig bin. Von ihm kann ich es nicht herauskriegen. Wenn nötig komme ich einmal eigens nach Zürich, um alles zu besprechen und zu ordnen […] Auch was ich meiner Frau schuldig bin, möchte ich gerne wissen. Sie darf unter keinen Umständen zu Schaden kommen.“


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), physicist, Nobel laureate. ALS. N. p. o. d. [c. 1932]. Narrow folio. 1 ½ pp. Browned; folded; tear to edge. In German. Important letter to his first wife, Mileva Einstein-Maric (1875–1948): “[...] I am very sorry that Tetel’s illness has worsened so much. I still will not be coming to Zurich because I have the certain feeling that you are not keeping an honest relationship with me. I shall express it clearly for the last time: you can then settle on your course of action with yourself and your own conscience. When I received the Nobel prize, I left it to you with the purpose of ensuring your future and that of the children. I wanted to convey quite clearly that this sum – which was all I had in those days – was to be taken into account for the children’s inheritance upon my death. This is the only way how I can remain in a position to provide sufficiently for other people close to me. I neglected to make this clear. I have frequently written to you and Tetel, trying to clear up this point, but received nothing but evasive answers. Instead, you have tried to worm money out of me at every opportunity, which only makes my situation worse and worse. Several years ago I lent you a sum which you never repaid me. Under these circumstances it is not surprising that I have come to the conviction that you are taking a dishonest position towards me. It is up to the three of you to re-establish my faith by sending me a legally binding declaration which either states that the Nobel prize is to be credited against the children’s inheritance or that you will not contest my will. As long as I am not in possession of such a legally binding declaration I must assume that you entertain dishonest designs against me, and I am determined to adjust my actions accordingly. I know that you have not told the children at all that I gave you the Nobel prize in its entirety. Quite the contrary – in Zurich you kept trying to create the impression that I was discriminating against you and the children. I am sending a copy of this letter to Albert so that I can be sure that your behavior towards me is based on everyone’s complete knowledge of the circumstances. Tetel shall be involved in the matter only when you and Albert have agreed on the attitude that you wish to adopt [...]”.


Einstein, Albert

2 Schriftstücke m. e. U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), physicist, Nobel laureate. 2 DS “Albert Einstein”. Berlin, 1 Feb. 1924. Folio. 3 pp. 1 letter on typing paper; slightly waterstained; folded; both letters stapled together. In German. Letter to his first wife Mileva Einstein-Maric (1875–1948): “[...] I am sending you the second copy of my letter to Messrs. Ladenburg, Thalmann & Co. in New York, which you will please read carefully and then send to the said company after adding your instructions regarding the interest. I am adding a copy of the letter to the company for your records. By these instructions to the bank I am fulfilling that paragraph of our contract stipulating that in the event of our divorce and my receiving the Nobel prize, the prize money shall become your property. The letter also conforms to the provision [...] that you shall have free disposal of the interest, but can dispose of the capital only with my consent. My actions are at variance with the contract only in that I have deposited the capital in a North American and not a Swiss bank, because I think this safer and more advantageous for you and the children in view of the circumstances which have arisen due to the war after the conclusion of the contract [...]”. – The second letter to Ladenburg, Thalmann & Co. in New York in the same matter: “[...] I hereby request you to note that the property of all assets on this account has been transferred by agreement to Mrs. Mileva Einstein, with the qualification that Mrs. Mileva Einstein or, respectively, in the case of her death, her children, can freely dispose of the interest, but can dispose of the capital only with my consent during my lifetime. My consent to such directives regarding the capital will be expressed by my counter-signature on the relevant letters by Mrs. Mileva Einstein [...] Upon my death, all such restrictions placed on Mrs. Mileva Einstein or, after her death, on her children, are to be dropped [...]”. – Includes: letter by Ladenburg, Thalmann & Co. to Mileva Einstein; New York, 28 Feb. 1924; 4°, 1 p. With printed letterhead. In German: “We are in receipt of your correspondence of Feb. 9, the content of which we have noted in its entirety, and will act according to your instructions. As we have notified Professor Dr. Albert Einstein in Berlin by today’s mail, we are satisfied by your having quoted Professor Einstein’s letter of Feb. 1, 1924 verbatim, and therefore do not require you to send us your copy of this letter [...]”.


Einstein, Albert

Ms. Brief m. eigenh. Unterschrift „A. Einstein“.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Einstein writes to Blanch H. Schlick, widow of Moritz Schlick. In full (translated): “I thank you for sending the most interesting lectures of your esteemed husband, who has made a lasting contribution to the philosophy of science in our time and whose influence continues unabated into the present. I repeatedly and carefully studied this lecture shortly after a severe operation, and had much pleasure in the clarity and sharpness of the arguments and no less in the masterful style. I would think that engaging with his literary estate is a beautiful life-work for you, which compensates you somewhat for the bitter and tragic loss, which you share with philosophically interested contemporaries.” In fine to very fine condition, with unobtrusive intersecting folds and a censorship stamp to left blank area.

When the up-and-coming German philosopher Moritz Schlick published his Space and Time in Contemporary Physics in 1917—which he described as an ‘elucidation of the thesis that space and time have now forfeited all objectivity in physics’—he found an instant fan in Einstein. Touting the work as ‘masterly,’ Einstein recognized him as one of the first commentators to see that space and time have no existence or reality prior to the metric field, and the two began a correspondence that would last a lifetime. Securing the prestigious position as chair of Naturphilosophie at the University of Vienna in 1922 (with a recommendation from Einstein), Schlick surrounded himself with luminaries in philosophy, physics, and mathematics, heading the legendary Vienna Circle of thinkers, lecturing internationally, and publishing numerous influential essays. When he was assassinated by a former student on the steps of the University in 1936, the shaken intellectual world mourned the loss of one of the greatest minds of their time. Ensuring that her husband’s literary legacy would persevere, Blanche Hardy Schlick undertook the organization of his estate, editing and publishing past works, letters, and lectures, and sharing with the figures who helped shape his work. Thanking Schlick’s widow for her work and praising her husband’s “clarity and sharpness of the arguments” and “masterful style,” this is a remarkable letter connecting two legendary minds.


Einstein, Albert

Typed letter signed „A. Einstein“.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar


Einstein, Albert

Autograph Letter Signed ("A. Einstein"), in German.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar


Einstein, Albert

Typed Postcard Signed ("A. Einstein") with Autograph Salutation and Postscript, in German.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar


Einstein, Albert

A group of material related to Albert Einstein and the family of Adolph Stern
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar


Einstein, Albert

Autograph manuscript signed ("A. Einstein").
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

An important working manuscript apparently representing Einstein’s notes for a paper entitled “On a Generalization of Kaluza’s Theory of Electricity” which he wrote jointly with Peter Bergmann, and which was published in the Annals of Mathematics, vol. 39, no. 3, July 1938, pp. 683-701. Although the manuscript differs in many details from the published article (written in English), there are enough correspondences in wording, and also with respect to the equations to the section of the article headed "The Space Structure" to suggest very strongly a link between it and the 1938 paper. In sum, the manuscript details part of Einstein’s attempt to construct a unified theory of electromagnetism, gravitation and quantum mechanics based on a curved five dimensional spacetime with five spacetime coordinates x1, x2, x3, x4, x0 and four spatial coordinates, one of which, x0, is periodic. Through every point it is assumed that there passes a closed geodesic given by x1, x2, x3, x4 constant. This particular approach is sometimes referred to as "Projective Relativity" and is a type of unified theory pioneered by T. Kaluza and later by O. Klein in the 1920s. Kaluza's and Klein’s ideas play a key part of modern Super String theory and are currently being extensively pursued by theoretical physicists. - After obtaining his doctorate at the German University in Prague in 1936 under the direction of Philipp Frank, Peter Bergmann (1915-2002) collaborated with Einstein, as his research assistant, at the Institute for Advanced Study between 1936 and 1941. In 1942, Bergmann published a textbook on General Relativity, Introduction to the Theory of Relativity, which contained a foreword by Einstein. We understand that Einstein presented this manuscript to the daughter of Luther P. Eisenhart, Chairman of the Mathematics Department at Princeton University. - Remains of mount on verso, light browning towards edges.


Einstein, Albert

3 eigenh. Zeilen mit U. ("A. E.").
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Einstein is responding (in German) to the question put by his correspondence partner "What is the best way for an individual to contribute to a world of better understanding?": "Dem A. in ruhiger Art sagen, wie wohl der B. unter den obwaltenden Umständen denken und fühlen mag" ("To tell A. in quiet way how B. would think and feel under the prevailing circumstances"). - Henry D. Isaac, the one who wrote to Einstein on September 15, 1954, tells of himself: "[...] I come from Berlin [...] my late father was the closest friend of Dr. Carl Heinrichsdorff, the brother-in-law of your late cousin, Mr. Rudolf Moss, whom I personally knew too".


Einstein, Albert

Maschinenschriftlicher Brief mit eigenh. Unterschrift „A. Einstein“.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar


Einstein, Albert

Gedruckte Karte mit Danksagung für Glückwünsche u. eigenh. Unterschrift „A. Einstein.“
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

„May I send you my warm thanks for your gracious message of congratulation on the occasion of my birthday. It was most thoughtful of you to remember me“.


Einstein, Albert

Bildpostkarte mit eigenh. Unterschrift „Albert Einstein Kaputh 1930“.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar


Einstein, Albert

Group of 4 letters Signed, "A. Einstein," each to Helmut L. Bradt, in German, including an Autograph Letter Signed, in green ink, and 3 Typed Letters Signed.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar


Einstein, Albert

E. Bildpostkarte mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Bildpostkarte m. U. „Papa“, Dahlem [Berlin], 10. September 1914 [Poststempel], 1 Seite kl.-8°. Kurz nach seiner Trennung von seiner ersten Frau Mileva an seinen Sohn Hans Albert „Albert Einstein junior“: „[…] Ich packe gerade alle Sachen für Euch ein. Sei herzlich gegrüsst und schreib auch alle 2 Wochen. Ich werde Dir regelmässig antworten. Sei mit Tete geküsst von Deinem Papa“. – Die Bildpostkarte zeigt ein gemaltes Motiv der Prager Innenstadt. – Im Jahr 1914 zog Einstein mit seiner Frau Mileva und deren Kinder nach Berlin, wo er die Stelle des Direktors des zu gründenden Kaiser-Wilhelm-Instituts für Physik angeboten bekommt. Im Juni 1914 trennen sich Albert Einstein und Mileva. Sie fährt mit den Kindern zurück nach Zürich.


Einstein, Albert

E. Postkarte mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Postkarte m. U. „Papa“, o. O. [Berlin], 25. Dezember 1915, 1 Seite 8°. An seinen Sohn Hans Albert (1904-1973) in Zürich nach der Trennung von seiner Frau Mileva im Jahr zuvor: „[…] Schon lange hat mich nichts mehr gefreut wie Deine Karte mit Eurem und des kleinen Zürchers wohlgelungenen Bildern. Immer wieder nehme ich sie aus der Brieftasche und betrachte sie. Du musst Dich nun aber noch die paar Monate gedulden, mein Sohn. Ich bin für die viele Fahrerei zu ermüdet, habe nur kurz Zeit und scheue auch die grosse Geldausgabe. Dafür werde ich mich im April umso mehr mit Dir beschäftigen. Du kannst vorläufig auf dem Zürichberg herumpurzeln auf Deinen neuen Rutschhölzern; geh nur recht viel hinaus, dass Du kräftig wirst. Nimm sicher mit Tete das Chlorkalzium, von dem ich Dir gestern schrieb […]“


Einstein, Albert

E. Postkarte mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Postkarte m. U. „Papa“, o. O. [Berlin] u. D. [16. März 1916], 1 ½ Seiten 8°. An seinen Sohn Hans Albert (1904-1973) in Zürich: „[…] Die kuriose Unterschrift in meinem letzten Schreiben ist dadurch zu erklären, dass ich öfter in meiner Zerstreutheit statt mich selber die Person unterschreibe, an die der Brief gerichtet ist. Anfang April werde ich also versuchen, nach Zürich zu kommen. Wenn man mich nicht hinauslässt, treffen wir uns an der Grenze (Gottmadingen bei Schaffhausen). Ich wohne jedenfalls im Gasthaus, sodass wir ganz allein sein werden, ohne dass ein Fremder dabei ist. Ich gratuliere Dir zu dem bestandenen Examen. Welche Schule besuchst Du jetzt? Du machst noch so viele Fehler beim Schreiben. Du musst in dieser Beziehung aufpassen; es wirkt zu komisch, wenn einer die Worte falsch schreibt. Am liebsten wäre ich ausserhalb Zürichs mit Dir beisammen, weil in Zürich zu viele Menschen sind, die ich kenne. Die Hauptfrage ist, ob ich hinüber kann. Küsse an Tete […]“ – Im Juni 1914 trennten sich Albert Einstein und Mileva. Sie zog mit den Kindern zurück nach Zürich.


Einstein, Albert

E. Postkarte mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Postkarte m. U. „Papa“, Berlin, 26. September [1916], 1 Seite 8°. Mit e. Absenderangabe „A. Einstein“. An seinen Sohn Hans Albert (1904-1973) in Zürich: „[…] Ich schreibe Dir jetzt das dritte Mal, ohne von Dir eine Antwort zu bekommen. Erinnerst Du Dich nicht mehr an Deinen Vater? Sollen wir uns nicht einmal wieder sehen? Von meinen Freunden Zangger und Besso höre ich mit grosser Befriedigung, dass es Mama wieder besser geht. Ich habe der Tante zweimal nach Neusatz geschrieben […] Wenn Sie noch nicht bei Euch ist, so schreibt ihr recht bald. Sie hängt sehr an Euch und erhält nie einen Brief […]“ – Im Juni 1914 trennten sich Albert Einstein und Mileva. Sie zog mit den Kindern zurück nach Zürich.


Einstein, Albert

E. Postkarte mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Postkarte m. U. „Papa“, Zürich, „Donnerstag“ [Poststempel:6. April 1916], 1 Seite kl.-8°. An seine Söhne Hans Albert (1904-1973) und Eduard (1910-1965) in Zürich: „[…] Soeben bin ich hier angekommen. Ich wohne im Hotel Gotthard Bahnhofstr. ganz neben dem Bahnhof Zimmer No. 50 und freue mich unbändig, Euch zu sehen. Ich erwarte Euch morgen (Freitag) Vormittag zwischen 9 und 12 Uhr im Hotel […]“ – Im Juni 1914 trennten sich Albert Einstein und Mileva. Sie zog mit den Kindern zurück nach Zürich.


Einstein, Albert

E. Postkarte mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Postkarte m. U. „Euer Papa bzw. Albert“, Zürich, 12. Januar o. J. [1919], 1 Seite 8°. An seine erste Frau Mileva Einstein-Maric (1875-1948) und seinen Sohn Hans Albert (1904-1973): „[…] Euer Brief hat mich sehr gefreut. Ich will auf die Angelegenheit mit dem raren Vogelfutter gern zurückkommen, wenn ich wieder nach Zürich komme. Einstweilen (bis zum 19.) muss ich in geschäftlicher Angelegenheit verreisen. Wenn ichs einrichten kann, gehe ich für ein paar Tage zu Tete [sein Sohn Eduard] nach Arosa. Als gestern Adu [sein Sohn Hans Albert] mit dem Brief ankam, war ich zuhause, aber man suchte nicht richtig nach mir. In 2 Stunden geht mein Zug ab. Mit der Gesundheit geht es mir übrigens unvergleichlich besser als letztes Jahr […]“ – Sein Sohn Eduard befand sich zu dieser Zeit in einem Sanatorium in Arosa.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), physicist and Nobel laureate. ALS. N. p., 13 June 1919. Large 4°. 1 2/3 pp. Folded. In German. To his son Hans Albert (1904–1973): “[…] Yesterday I received your kind, long letter. I write back immediately since there would be no time otherwise, for on July 1st I aim to be in Zurich. I will be coming alone this time and will again stay at the ‘Sternwarte’ guesthouse. I hope I don’t forget the photographic plates documenting your childhood! I greatly look forward to seeing you again. My doctor won’t permit me a proper hike because he says I wouldn’t get the right food. But we could take a room somewhere high up from where one can take nice walks (or somewhere we could go sailing)? Early August would be an option, as my lectures finish just before then. Unfortunately, my mother is dying in Lucerne. She will die within a year and is suffering dreadfully. So I will have to be there frequently, of course. Your question about the sail is not as simple as you imagine. I will tell you about it and many other things when we’re together. I find your remark about Heller’s compositions very funny. Tell Mama to plan her finances because I will not be able to send the money as promptly as usual this July. The foreign exchange is being tremendously difficult. It’s a good thing that I receive something for my lectures in Zurich, even though it’s not much. My health is fine because I am very well taken care of. But I must keep a strict diet and may not over-exert myself physically. I am pleased by your detailed account of your school. I had not much use for history myself; but I think that has more to do with the way it’s taught than with the subject proper. Taken for itself, after all, it’s very interesting what people were up to in former days. Perhaps we could take Tete along, as I’m not allowed to walk so much anyway. But let’s not go to Rheinfelden, that would not be at all recreational for me, and this is to be my only recreation this year […]”. – With a note to his son Eduard with birthday wishes: “[…] Your letter gave me much pleasure. It does really contain everything really important. I look forward to seeing you in Zurich soon […]”. – Einstein’s mother Pauline died in February 1920. She spent the last months of her life with her son in Berlin.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Brief m. U. „Papa“, o. O., 28. November o. J. [1924], 1 Seite gr.-4°. Einstein schreibt an seine beiden Söhne Hans Albert (1904-1973) und Eduard (1910-1965) „Meine lieben Kinder“ über deren Tätigkeiten er sich sehr freut: „[…] Dir l[lieber]. Tete vor allem meinen Glückwunsch zu der so wohlgelungenen Zeichnung bezw. zu der durch sie erlangten Uhr. Dies Talent hast Du sicher nicht von Deinem Vater. Und über Deinen Schaffenseifer, l[ieber]. Albert hab ich mich nicht minder gefreut, über das gute Examen, vor allem aber darüber, dass Du die ganzen Vermessungs-Rechnungen ohne vollständige Anleitung allein gemacht hast. Ich weiss, was dies für eine Energie Leistung bedeutet. Ob ich Euch noch besuchen kann vor meiner Reise nach Südamerika, weiss ich nicht. Das Schiff geht am 5. März in Hamburg ab. Schade, dass ich keinen von Euch mitnehmen kann, da es doch die Schule nicht zulässt. So reise ich ganz allein. Im Sommer komme ich dann auch nach Kiel, wo wir alle drei zusammen sein wollen. Tete muss auch einmal tüchtig segeln. Das ist die beste Stärkung für die Gesundheit. Ich liege gerade an einer bockigen Influenza im Bett. Es ist aber schon besser. Du hast recht, dass Du im Sommer nach Kiel gehst, l[ieber]. Albert. Das verpflichtet Dich zu nichts, und Du lernst […] dabei. Für das Theoretische bin ich zu Deiner Verfügung. Ich freue mich viel mehr darauf als auf die Reiserei nach Amerika […] Ich war neulich in der ‚heil[igen]. Johanna’ von B. Shaw. Es ist ein grossartiges Stück, das Ihr lesen oder sehen müsst […]“


Einstein, Albert

E. Postkarte mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Postkarte m. U. „Papa“, o. O. [Berlin], 22. Juni 1925, 1 ½ Seiten 8°. Gebräunt. An seinen Sohn Eduard „Lieber Tete“ (1910-1965): „[…] Eben kam Brief von Bergson des Inhaltes, dass es noch ganz unbestimmt sei, wann unsere Sitzung stattfinden kann. Also lade ich Mama und Dich ein, gleich zu Beginn Deiner Ferien zu uns zu kommen und bei uns zu wohnen. Wenn sie es so nicht will, dann komme Du allein zu uns; wenn sie auch das nicht will, dann wohnst Du in der Katzenstein’schen Klinik. Ich kann im Juli noch nicht von hier weg, teils, weil ich so lange abwesend war, teils weil mich wichtige wissenschaftliche Arbeiten hier festhalten. Die Kakteen sind meist in gutem Zustand und werden von Margot gut behandelt. Einige sind an den Reisefolgen nachträglich gestorben. Die anderen werden im Zimmer gehalten und kriegen nur alle paar Tage etwas Wasser. Es wäre aber sehr gut, wenn Mama den Transport nach Zürich selbst besorgte. Anfang August gehen wir noch nach Kiel, sodass wir dort noch einige Zeit zu 3 sind […]“


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), physicist and Nobel laureate. ALS “Papa“. [Berlin], 22 June [1925]. Large 8°. 2 pp. In German. To his first wife, Mileva Einstein-Maric (1875–1948): “[…] On the 11th we start the session, which will last until the end of July. I will probably be free between the 13th and the 20th. I therefore suggest that you go away with Tete until August 1 and then turn him over to me. I’d then like to take him somewhere in the mountains for 2 weeks, perhaps to the Engadine, but some place where it’s not so expensive. The main thing is the altitude and the sun. You might also want to make inquiries. I am told to seek the mountains for my health, and it will surely do Tete a lot of good, too. Do you agree? You could also come along for a bit if you aren’t worried about the talk it would raise; personally, I don’t mind these things at all (I have become completely hardened in this respect). Albert wrote to me twice, but only when he wanted something from me, not out of an inner need. But I understand that rather well. I acted quite similarly when I was in his position. Tete’s letters give me much pleasure. I think it is very important for me to spend as much time as possible with him during this time of his turbulent development. […] Tetel shall not be angry with me for not writing to him. I am so busy that time and strength will not suffice. But I am happy every day when I think of him […]”.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), Nobel laureate in physics. ALS “Papa”. N. p., 23 Feb. 1927. Large 4°. 1 p. Folded. In German. To his son Hans Albert, regarding his fiancée and later wife Frieda Knecht: “[…] I am pained to hear that you now want to let your wife come. She will never let go of you and will draw you from one disaster to the next. If you find it so boring in Dortmund, why don’t you give up your position there and come here. It will be interesting and a change of pace for you. It all comes from her having seized you first, which is why you now view her as the embodiment of femininity. It is, after all, a common way for sillies to fall victim to fate. In any case: never send or bring Miss Knecht to me, for the way things are, I simply could not bear it. If, however, you ever feel the urge to separate from her, then do not be proud, but confide in me, so that I may help you. For that day will come. Think about whether you really want to stay in Dortmund, or whether I should look for something for you here. That would not be difficult for me; and it would be much more interesting and educating than in Dortmund. If so, must it be in steel engineering, or would a wider field do as well? Where do you take your meals? Are you staying at a boarding house? Be careful not to ruin your stomach, this is so often the case with young persons who are unaccustomed to taking care of themselves [...]”. – Hans Albert studied engineering at the Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH) in Zurich and for some time worked as a construction engineer in Dortmund. He married Frieda Knecht in 1927.


Einstein, Albert

E. Postkarte mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger. E. Postkarte m. U., Berlin, 8. Juli 1920, 1 Seite quer-kl.-8°. Berieben u. knitterig, 3 geklebte Einrisse. An den Philosophen, Physiker u. Mathematiker Philipp Frank (1884-1966) in Prag: „[…] Es freut mich sehr, dass Sie mir Ihren Besuch in Aussicht stellen. Ich bin stets hier ausser am 12. und 18. Juli (Vortrag in Hamburg). Ich bin auf Ihre neue Gedanken sehr neugierig […]“


Einstein, Albert

Typed letter signed.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

To Herman Schulman, ending their correspondence: "Ihre Andeutungen sind so geheimnisvoll, dass Sie einem handfesten Physiker Angstträume verursachen können. Ich gehe nicht näher drauf ein, weil ich den Eindruck habe, dass Sie die Sache selber nicht ernst nehmen" (translation: "Your intimations are so mysterious that they could cause a true physicist to have nightmares. I will not pursue this further because I have the impression that you yourself do not take the issue seriously").


Einstein, Albert

Portraitphotographie m. e. U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), physicist, Nobel laureate; father of the Theory of Relativity. Portrait photograph with autogr. dedication signed, n. p., 1934, 25 x 20 cm. Small tear; wrinkled and brownstained at the edges. Uncommon head-to-knee portrait of Einstein, standing before a building with the housekeeper. Elsa Einstein is gaily laughing into the camera, holding a parasol. Dedication: “For Mrs. Martha, the wizard | with warm thanks | Albert Einstein | 1934.“ On the reverse, autogr. dedication signed by Elsa Einstein: “For Mrs. Martha in gratitude for many good things! Elsa Einstein”. – The picture was taken in the Spring of 1933 in front of the house of the New York lawyer Samuel Untermeyer in Palm Springs.


Einstein, Albert

1950 Princeton autograph book with entries by Einstein, Oppenheimer, von Neumann, Bohr, Pauli, and many others.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

An album signed by numerous luminaries from Princeton's Institute for Advanced Study, including Albert Einstein, John von Neumann, J. Robert Oppenheimer, Niels Bohr, Wolfgang Pauli, Abraham Pais, George Kennan, Oswald Veblen, James Waddell Alexander II, Hermann Weyl, Harold F. Cherniss, Ivan M. Linforth, Kurt Reidemeister, Walter W. Stewart, E. A. Lowe, Erwin Panofsky, Herbert Feis, Atle Selberg, Arnold J. Toynbee, Max Radin, David Mitrany, Y. K. Wong, and others. A vintage candid oblong 8vo portrait of Einstein is loosely inserted at the end. The entries are inscribed to the then twenty-year-old physicist William R. Bennett, Jr. (1930-2008), who received his bachelor's degree at Princeton before taking a doctorate in physics from Columbia. In 1960, Bennett co-invented the first gas laser at Bell Labs, then in 1962 joined the newly formed department of physics and applied science at Yale. In 1964, he was named a professor of physics and applied science at Yale, and remained there for the rest of his career. - Front cover gilt-stamped "W. B. Jr.". In fine condition, with some wear to the album's covers and vertical creases to the photograph.


Einstein, Albert

Postkarte mit eigenh. Zusatz und Unterschrift.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar


Einstein, Albert

Albumblatt mit eigenh. Unterschrift und eigenh. Angabe seines Geburtsdatums.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar


Einstein, Albert

Letter signed.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar


Einstein, Albert

Masch. Brief mit eigenh. Unterschrift. „A. Einstein“.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar


Einstein, Albert

Autograph letter signed (‘A. Einstein’) to Hugo Bergmann.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar


Einstein, Albert

Typed letter signed ('A. Einstein') to Paul Epstein, Institute for Advanced Study.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar


Einstein, Albert

Typed letter signed ('A. Einstein') to Paul Epstein.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar


Einstein, Albert

Autograph letter signed (‘A. Einstein‘) to Otto Juliusburger
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar


Einstein, Albert

Autograph letter signed „A. Einstein“.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar


Einstein, Albert

Eigenh. Brief mit Unterschrift „Albert“.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar


Einstein, Albert

Eigenh. Postkarte mit Unterschrift.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar


Einstein, Albert

2 Originalphotographien.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar


Einstein, Albert

Photographie mit eigenh. Grußzeile und Unterschrift auf der Rückseite.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar


Einstein, Albert

Ms. Brief mit eigenh. U. ("A. Einstein").
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

To Dr. Friedrich Simon Archenhold (1861-1939), the German astronomer and founder of the observatory that now bears his name. Einstein writes this friendly, brief letter in response to a scientific article Archenhold has sent him, which he analyzes in light of his theory of relativity. "I have read your friendly article and the submitted manuscript with interest. The error of the latter is that a pendulum clock alone is not a 'clock' in the sense of relativity theory, but merely the combination of a pendulum clock with a gravitating celestial body. Failure to ignore this circumstance gives rise to the error of the authors" (transl. from the German original). - Horizontal and vertical folds; short splits starting at each end of horizontal fold; two holes punched along left edge covered with scraps of paper at verso, along with a short tear and tiny hole; small pencil mark at upper left corner; minimal soft rumpling around edges. Small stain at verso; mild darkening along creases. Overall in good condition.


Einstein, Albert

E. Postkarte mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), Physiker und Nobelpreisträger. E. Postkarte mit U. [Berlin, 30. November 1915]. 1 Seite 8°. Mit e. Adresse. – An seinen Sohn Hans Albert (1904–1973): „Soeben erhielt ich Deinen Brief, über dessen lieblosen Ton ich sehr betrübt bin. Ich sehe aus Deiner langen Wartezeit und aus der Unfreundlichkeit Deines Briefes, dass Dir mein Besuch wenig Freude machen würde. Ich halte es deshalb nicht für richtig, mich dafür 2.20 Stunden in die Eisenbahn zu setzen, um damit niemand eine Freude zu machen. Erst dann werde ich Dich wieder besuchen, wenn Du mich selbst darum bittest [...] Das Weihnachtsgeschenk werde ich auf Deinen Wunsch in Geld senden. Ich finde allerdings, dass ein Luxus-Geschenk, das 70 fr kostet, unseren Verhältnissen nicht entspricht [...]“.


Einstein, Albert

E. Bildpostkarte mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), Physiker und Nobelpreisträger. E. Bildpostkarte mit U. [Zürich, 15. April 1916]. ½ Seite quer-8°. Mit e. Adresse. – An seinen Sohn „Adu“, d. i. Hans Albert (1904–1973): „Ich erwarte Dich Montag 10h im physikal. Institut [...]“. – Die Bildseite mit einer Ansicht des Vierwaldstättersees.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), Physiker und Nobelpreisträger. E. Brief mit U. O. O., 16. November 1919. 1¼ Seiten 4°. – An seine geschiedene Gattin Mileva Maric (1875–1948): „Deine Reklamation wegen der 2000 M ist vollkommen berechtigt. Ich habe das Geld irrtümlicherweise überwiesen bekommen, werde aber dafür sorgen, dass Du ein gleichwertiges Papier (oder das Geld) auf Dein Konto erhältst, nachdem dasselbe Deinem Wunsche gemäss bei der Züricher Kantonalbank untergebracht ist [...] Umso mehr muss das bis[s]chen Schweizergeld geschont werden, das doch seinen Wert in der Hauptsache behalten hat. Dazu solltet Ihr eben so bald nach Deutschland ziehen nach meiner Meinung. Sobald als möglich werde ich Schritte thun, um Euch in einer geeigneten Stadt im Badischen Wohnung zu suchen, was bei der entsetzlichen Wohnungsnot keine Kleinigkeit ist. Am sympathischsten wäre es mir, Ihr würdet die Züricher Wohnung möbliert vermieten, weil man so den fürchterliche Umzug sparen könnte. Jedenfalls aber müsste man versuchen, durch Wohnungstausch mit einer badischen Familie, die in die Schweiz will, Unterschlupf zu kriegen [...] Eine Vermeidung des Meubeltransportes wäre auch insofern sehr erwünscht, als man ja bei den heutigen unsicheren Zeiten doch nicht weiß, was der morgige Tag bringen wird [...]“.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), Physiker und Nobelpreisträger. E. Brief mit U. O. O., 1. August 1920. 1 Seite 4°. – An seinen Sohn „Tete“, d. i. Eduard (1910–1965): „Dein ausführlicher Brief mit den herzigen Bildern hat mich ausserordentlich gefreut. Es thut mir auch oft weh, dass ich Euch so wenig habe. Aber ich bin ein vielbeschäftigter Mann und kann nur wenig von hier weg. Ausserdem ist es unter den jetzigen schwierigen Verhältnissen in der Schweiz für mich zu teuer. Ich bin schon froh, wenn ich Euch dort ernähren kann. Nun freut mich aber sehr, dass wir uns am 5. Oktober in Benzingen bei Sigmaringen sehen werden. Wir wohnen dort entweder beim Pfarrer, mit dem ich gut befreundet bin[,] oder bei einer dortigen Frau, die er uns empfiehlt. Ich hoffe, dass wir mindestens 10 Tage dort beisammen bleiben können. Ich muss dann nach Holland fahren, um einen Vortrag zu halten; ich bin aber in der Zeit nicht gebunden, es muss nur alles im Oktober sein. Wir beide waren noch so wenig beisammen, dass ich Dich noch gar wenig kenne, trotzdem ich Dein Vater bin. Du hast gewiss auch nur eine ziemlich unbestimmte Vorstellung von mir. Ich will mir aber Mühe geben, dass dies anders wird. Zum Teil kommt es daher, dass Du so viel krank warst. Wir treffen uns dann in Sigmaringen [...] Es ist nett, dass Du ein guter Schüler bist; das Schönschreiben war auch bei mir eine schwache Seite. Sei in der Schule nicht ehrgeizig. Es schadet nichts, wenn andere bessere Schüler sind, als Du [...]“.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), Physiker und Nobelpreisträger. E. Brief mit U. Leiden, 5. Mai 1922. 2 Seiten 8°. – An seinen Sohn Hans Albert (1904–1973): „Vor allem entgegen meiner Gewohnheit herzliche Glückwünsche zum Geburtstag im Voraus, weil ich gerade daran denke. Ich freue mich schon sehr auf die Ferien. Was nun die Verpflegung anbelangt, will ich Anna zu bekommen suchen. Wenn sie nicht kann, müssen wir uns vielleicht selbst zu helfen suchen in Verbindung mit Wirtshaus. Das Schiff wird noch lackiert und dann geht’s los. Wie werden wir vergnügt herumkutschieren. Tröste Mama wegen Deiner Studiererei; es wird schon zur Maturität langen, und glänzend brauchts ja nicht zu sein [...] Wir können im Sommer sehr gut bei Katzenstein [d. i. Einsteins langjähriger Freund, der Chirurg Moritz Katzenstein, 1872–1932] musizieren, zu dessen Haus wir gar nicht weit zu fahren haben [...] Vielleicht finden wir aber auch da draußen ein Klavier [...]“.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), Physiker und Nobelpreisträger. E. Brief mit U. Kiel, 12. Mai 1924. 2 Seiten auf Doppelblatt. 8°. – An seine geschiedene Gattin Mileva Maric (1875–1948): „Ich bin ja immer dafür gewesen, dass Ihr ein Haus kaufen sollt. Ich kann die Sache selbst nicht so gut beurteilen und bin nie für vieles Fragen gewesen. Wenn aber Zangger [d. i. der Ordinarius und Direktor des Instituts für Gerichtliche Medizin in Zürich Heinrich Zangger, 1874–1957] die Suche befürwortet, so kauft das Haus ruhig; ich gebe hiemit meine Einwilligung [...] Meine Unfreundlichkeit im Sommer kam daher, dass ich über Deinen und Alberts Brief beleidigt war. Ich habe aber jetzt den Eindruck, dass ich insofern Unrecht hatte, als keine unfreundliche Gesinnung dahintersteckte. Von ferne nimmt sich alles anders aus, und es mischt sich leicht Galle in die harmlosesten Angelegenheiten aus Missverständnis. Ich will einmal in absehbarer Zeit nach Zürich kommen, und wir wollen alles Vergangene, soweit es schlecht ist, vergessen sein lassen. Du musst auch nicht immer so bärmeln, sondern Dich über das Schöne freuen, das Dir das Leben geschenkt hat, z. B. die prächtigen Kinder, das Haus, und dass Du – nicht mehr mit mir verheiratet bist. Anschütz [d. i. Einsteins Freund Hermann Anschütz-Kaempfe, Wissenschafter und Erfinder des Kreiselkompasses, 1872–1931] möchte einmal seine Fabrik in Alberts Hände legen Ich habe eine große Meinung von der Zukunft seines Unternehmens und glaube, dass Albert sehr befähigt dafür wäre [...]“.


Einstein, Albert

E. Postkarte mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), Physiker und Nobelpreisträger. E. Postkarte mit U. Berlin, 27. Oktober 1924. 1 Seite 8°. Mit e. Adresse. – An seinen Sohn Hans Albert (1904–1973): „[...] Ich schiffe mich also am 3. März wirklich nach Buenos Aires ein. Nach der Schweiz komme ich nun leider nicht so viel [...] Schreib dem Anschütz [d. i. Einsteins Freund Hermann Anschütz-Kaempfe, Wissenschafter und Erfinder des Kreiselkompasses, 1872–1931], dass Du (im Sommer?) in seiner Fabrik praktizieren willst – wenn Du dazu entschlossen bist. Es wird ihn freuen. Mir geht es gut. Mama habe ich bei Ehrenfest [d. i. der Physiker Paul Ehrenfest, 1880–1933, Einsteins bester Freund] entschuldigt. Hier gibt es viel Arbeit. Piccard [d. i. August Piccard, 1884-1962, Professor für Physik an der Universität Zürich und später Brüssel], der früher in Zürich war, jetzt in Brüssel[,] wird elektr. Experimente für mich machen, die mit dem erdmagnetischen Problem zusammenhängen [...]“.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), Physiker und Nobelpreisträger. E. Brief mit U. Berlin, 16. Juli 1925. 1 Seite auf Doppelblatt. 8°. Mit einem zweiseitigen e. Gedicht seines Sohnes „Teddy“, d. i. Eduard (1910–1965). – An „Mizu“, d. i. seine geschiedene Gattin Mileva Maric (1875–1948): „Wir sind recht vergnügt zusammen. Ich finde, dass Tete körperlich und geistig gut entwickelt und dass er ein guter Kamerad ist. Musiziert haben wir auch schon tüchtig. Gestern u. heute hatte ich ziemlich viel zu thun, doch waren wir schon zusammen im zoologischen Garten. Morgen wollen wir segeln. Leider muss ich am 25. abends nach Genf abreisen. Es wäre hübsch, wenn Albert ein paar Tage vorher hier sein könnte, dass wir hier noch ein paar Tage zusammen sind [...]“.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), Physiker und Nobelpreisträger. E. Brief mit U. O. O., 6. März 1926. ¾ S. 4°. – An seine geschiedene Gattin Mileva Maric (1875–1948): „Ich freute mich sehr mit Deinem ausführlichen und freundlichen Briefchen. Ich begreife auch Deine Angst wegen Albert. Wenn er keine Kinder von dem Mädchen zu erwarten hätte, würde ich nicht so energisch Stellung nehmen. Aber die Erbmasse unserer Kinder ist sowieso nicht einwandfrei. Wenn nur noch eine Belastung hinzukommt, dann ist es ein wahres Unglück. Bitte doch Albert, einmal mit Prof. Hans Meyer im Burghölzli zu sprechen. Es wäre ein Segen wenn er es thäte. Wenn ich nicht alles thäte, um dem Unglück vorzubeugen, müsste ich mir schwere Vorwürfe machen. Wenn er dann doch auf seinem Willen beharrt, nachdem man ihm alles vorgestellt hat, so trägt er eben allein die Verantwortung [...]“.


Einstein, Albert

E. Nachschrift mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), Physiker und Nobelpreisträger. E. Nachschrift (11 Zeilen) mit U. auf einem e. Brief seines Sohnes Hans Albert. Berlin, 27. Januar 1927. 1 Seite 4°. – An seine geschiedene Gattin Mileva Maric (1875–1948): „Der Adu [d. i. Hans Albert, 1904–1973) ist ein Prachtskerl [!], ein richtiger Mann geworden, der weiss was er will (leider auch thut was sie will). Ich hab ihn nicht viel geplagt, aber ihm doch meine Meinung wegen der Nachkommenschaft mit grossem Ernst gesagt. Ob es hilft, weiss ich nicht, da er sich nicht ausspricht [...]“. – Hans Albert berichtet in seinem Brief an die Mutter, daß er „am 1. Februar in Dortmund bei Aug[ust] Klönne eintrete [...] Papa hat sich sehr gefreut, dass ich die Stellung allein gefunden habe, d. h. ohne ihn [...]“. – Hans Albert Einstein war in besagter Stahlbaufirma August Klönnes als Konstrukteur und Statiker u. a. an Stahlwasserbauten – etwa für das Schiffshebewerk Niederfinow – beteiligt; durch Vermittlung seines Vaters sollte er 1931 nach Zürich zurückkehren und wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter an der 1930 eingerichteten Versuchsanstalt für Wasserbau an der ETH Zürich werden.


Einstein, Albert

E. Nachschrift mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), Physiker und Nobelpreisträger. E. Nachschrift (14 Zeilen) mit U. auf einem e. Brief seines Sohnes Eduard. O. O., 2. April 1927. 1 Seite 4°. – An seine geschiedene Gattin Mileva Maric (1875–1948): „Ich habe viel Freude mit Tete. Wir sprechen und musizieren gern und viel miteinander. Aber er frisst zu wenig und hat etwas Halswe. Hoffentlich werden wir ihn bald wieder flott haben, so daß wir ein wenig aufs Land können. Sogar zum Reger-Spielen hat mich der Kerl schon gebracht! Von Albert hatte ich nun auch wieder einen Brief, aber einen ohne irgendwas Persönliches [...]“. – Aus dem Brief Eduard Einsteins (1910–1965): „Gestern machten wir mit Bekannten eine Autofahrt nach Potsdam. Es war sehr schön. Sobald es mir ganz gut geht, werden wir in einem kleinen Ort unweit von hier auf’s Land gehen [...]“.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), Nobel laureate in physics. ALS. N. p., 12 March [probably spring 1919]. 8°. 3 pp on double leaf. In German. To his divorced wife Mileva Maric (1875–1948): “I have not yet answered your last letter but one because I am rather overwhelmed with work on various manuscripts. You must not be worried at all. For you, it is a mere formality, for me an unavoidable duty. Try to consider yourself in my place. Elsa [Einstein’s cousin and since June 1919 his second wife, formerly Elsa Löwenthal (divorced), 1876–1936] has two daughters, of which the elder is 18, that is to say, of age. This child, already greatly handicapped by the loss of an eye, suffers under the rumors concerning my relationship to her mother. I regret this and wish to remedy it by a formal marriage. For you, too, this formal change of circumstances would mean an improvement, as your legal rights would thus be laid down clearly. I am prepared to do even more than I once agreed to: 1) 5600 Marks annually for your personal allowance. 2) Payment of my Prague funds as well as of 6000 Marks of savings accumulated here into an account agreed upon by the both of us for the benefit of our children. 3) Payment of at least 3000 Marks annually to create the planned reserve fund. By thus reducing myself to a state of semi-poverty I prove to you that the well-being of my boys is my principal concern before everything else in the world. Also as a person I shall always be there for them first and foremost. Our divorce has nothing to do with my relationship to the boys. This is an exceedingly strange view of yours. However, I would like to stipulate one condition, one which no one can think unjustified. When peace has returned, I want to have the right to see my children not only on journeys, but also have them in my household during the short time I am granted with them; they would be alone with me and would not be subjected to the influence of strangers. For I have come to appreciate the conditions of living alone, which have revealed themselves to me as an indescribable blessing, and I shall never again give them up. I have forgotten something. 4) In the case of my decease you will be entitled to the pension in such a form that you would even receive it from Else’s estate in the case of her decease. And finally 5) The new marriage will have a full separation of property, so it cannot mean any financial harm to you. You can therefore be content and look to the future with calmness. After you have let me know you decision, I will transfer the matter to a servant of justice, who will take care that all is done correctly [...]”. – Insignificant tear to fol. 1.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), Physiker und Nobelpreisträger. E. Brief mit U. O. O., 29. Juni o. J. 1 Seite 8°. – An seine geschiedene Gattin Mileva Maric (1875–1948): „Ich komme am 9. Juli zu Euch mit einem Zug, der hier am 8. Juli abends abgeht. Am 10. werde ich wahrscheinlich nach Genf weiterfahren müssen. Es ist allerdings möglich, dass ich von 14.–19. Juli frei habe. Aber dies ist nicht einmal sicher. In dieser Zeit werde ich zu Euch nicht reisen können. Wenn Ihr ans Meer geht (nach Frankreich), so könntet Ihr vielleicht am 1. August wieder zurück sein. Dann gehe ich mit Tete [d. i. Einsteins Sohn Eduard, 1910–1965] wohl nach Chamonix. Das liegt günstig, und es sind dort einige Männer, mit denen ich einiges zu besprechen habe [...]“. – Die Verso-Seite mit einigen, wohl a. d. Hand Milevas stammenden Berechnungen.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), Physiker und Nobelpreisträger. E. Brief mit U. O. O. u. D. „Samstag“. 1 Seite 4°. – An seine geschiedene Gattin Mileva Maric (1875–1948): „Ich werde Eurem Wunsch, der mich sehr freut, dadurch nachkommen, dass ich mich auf der Rückreise, d. h. auf der Reise zwischen Bologna und Leiden in Zürich aufhalte. Ich würde am liebsten in Eurem Haus wohnen, wie ich es in Aussicht genommen hatte. Aber ich kann es nicht thun wegen des öffentlichen Skandals, der damit verbunden wäre. Ich bin schon ohnedies zu viel im Mittelpunkt des Geredes. Ich kann ja in der Pension neben Euch wohnen. Wir können dann über alles reden. Hauptfrage: Wo soll Albert [d. i. Einsteins Sohn Hans Albert, 1904–1973] studieren? Ich bin nicht mehr so unbedingt dafür, dass Ihr nach Deutschland ziehet. Es hat seine zwei Seiten. Ich reise Samstag 15. [m]orgens ab und komme nachts um halb zwei nach Innsbruck. Dort übernachte ich in der ‚goldenen Sonne’. Am besten wäre es, ich würde Albert dort finden. Wenn er aber nicht da ist, warte ich dort Sonntag auf ihn. Wir reisen dann wahrscheinlich direkt nach Florenz ev. mit Aufenthalt in Verona. In Florenz ist Maja [d. i. Einsteins Schwester Maria Winteler-Einstein, 1881–1951]. Sie wird sich sicher sehr freuen, Albert nach so langer Zeit wiederzusehen. Abends am 20. spätestens muss ich in Bologna sein. Am 26. habe ich dort meinen letzten Vortrag [...]“.


Einstein, Albert

Ms. Brief mit eigenh. U. ("A. Einstein").
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

In German, to the Austrian politician and writer Heinrich York-Steiner, a pioneer of Zionism, in answer to a request for permission to reprint a statement on Palestine. Einstein expresses his deepest admiration for York-Steiner's book "Die Kunst als Jude zu leben" (1928), which he has read in its entirety, fully agreeing with its analysis and finding it gratifying that the book has attracted so much interest. Einstein writes that he has published various items about recent conflicts with the Arabs and is unaware to which one York-Steiner refers, but gives permission to reprint whatever he finds appropriate. Einstein writes that he became acquainted with the concept of Zionism only in 1914, at the age of 35, after moving to Berlin, having previously lived in a totally neutral environment. "But ever since then it has been clear to me that to maintain, or rather regain, an existence in decency, we Jews have an urgent need to revive a sense of community. I recognize Zionism as the only effort that brings us closer to this goal. However, it is now necessary to ensure that this movement avoids the danger of degenerating into blind nationalism. Foremost, I feel, one must seek to replace resentment towards the Arabs with psychological understanding and an honest desire for co-operation. In my opinion, overcoming this difficulty will be the final touchstone on which will depend our community's right to exist in a higher sense". Unfortunately, Einstein must acknowledge that the attitude in official circles and the majority of published statements leave much to be desired in this regard. - On headed paper; small tears to centerfold re-backed.


Einstein, Albert

Copy of typewritten script of the episode "The Atom" of the TV programme "Your World Tomorrow" by Joseph Mindel, signed by "A. Einstein".
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar


Einstein, Albert

Autograph letter signed ("A. E.").
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar


Einstein, Albert

Autograph letter signed ("A. Einstein").
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar


Einstein, Albert

Autograph manuscript for "Bivector Fields II" (1944).
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar


Einstein, Albert

Autograph letter signed ("A. E.").
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar


Einstein, Albert

Faksimilierte Dankeskarte mit 5 eigenh. Zeilen und U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

A word of thanks to a well-wisher on the occasion of his 50th birthday.


Einstein, Albert

Ms. Brief mit eigenhändiger Unterschrift.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U. [Bleistift]
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), Physiker und Nobelpreisträger. E. Brief (in Bleistift) mit U. O. O. u. D. [Zürich, 1909 bis 1911], 1 Seite quer-kl.-8°. – Wie e. auf der Verso-Seite vermerkt an Prof. Dr. B in Karlsruhe: „Um 11 Uhr von einem Spaziergang heimgekehrt finde ich Ihre Karte vor. Nun suchte ich Sie im Institut und in Ihrer Wohnung. Da ich Sie nicht finden konnte, bleibt nichts anderes übrig, als dass ich in meiner Wohnung (Moussonstr. 12) warte, ob Sie mir nicht vielleicht eine zweite Mitteilung zugehen lassen. Es ist Telephon im Haus (Notar Güller), das benutzt werden kann [...]“. – Einstein war von 22. Oktober 1909 bis 30. März 1911 unter der erwähnten Adresse (heute Nr. 10) gemeldet. – Am unteren Rand gelocht (keine Textberührung).


Einstein, Albert

Maschinenschriftlicher Brief mit eigenh. Unterschrift „Papa“.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar


Einstein, Albert

Portraitphotographie m. e. U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879–1955), Nobel laureate in physics. Half-length portrait photograph with autogr. dedication signed. N. p., 1845. 257 x 202 mm. – For Dr. Haussner. Caption on the reverse by a different hand: “Dr. Albert Einstein. Princeton. Feb. 1945. Photo by Alan W. Richards. Palmer Lab. Princeton NJ”.


Einstein, Albert

Typed letter signed ("A. Einstein").
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar


Einstein, Albert

Typed letter signed ("A. Einstein").
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar


Einstein, Albert

Typed letter signed ("A. Einstein").
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar


Einstein, Albert

Typed letter signed ("A. Einstein").
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar


Einstein, Albert

Typed letter signed ("A. Einstein").
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar


Einstein, Albert

Typed letter signed ("A. Einstein").
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar


Einstein, Albert

Typed letter signed ("A. Einstein").
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar


Einstein, Albert

Autograph letter signed ("A. Einstein").
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar


Einstein, Albert

Eigenh. Postkarte mit Unterschrift „A. Einstein“.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar


Einstein, Albert

Brief m. e. U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. Brief m. e. U., Princeton, 22. Januar 1954, 2/3 Seite 4°. Blindgeprägter Briefkopf. Gefaltet. Mit Briefumschlag. An Hanne Walz in Hannover, die ihn zu dem wohl berühmtesten Bild Einsteins mit ausgestreckter Zunge (Fotografie: Arthur Sasse) befragt hatte: „[…] Ihr Brief […] hat mich besonders gefreut nicht nur wegen des munteren Stiles, sondern auch weil er einen sehr zutreffenden Gedanken äussert. Mein Verdienst an dem Bild ist allerdings insofern gering als es an jenem Tage nicht an die Haupthandlung sondern nur eine unbeachtete Nebenszene angeschlossen war. Ihr Vorschlag dürfte darum in den beteiligten Zirkeln keine begeisterte Aufnahme finden, weil da meist kein moralisches Gewicht übrig bliebe, wenn man den tierischen Ernst wegnähme. […]“ Beiliegt: Kopie des Gegenbriefes. – Das „Zungenbild“ entstand am Rande seines 72. Geburtstags, am 14. März 1951 in Princeton. Man hatte eine Feier für ihn ausgerichtet. Einstein wurde an diesem Ehrentag immer wieder von Fotografen bedrängt - schließlich war Einstein ein Medienstar. Die Journalisten wollten hören, was der große Physiker und Nobelpreisträger zur Weltpolitik zu sagen hätte. Doch Einstein war der ganze Medienrummel zuwider. Beim Verlassen der Feier nach dem Lunch konnte er den Kameras aber nicht mehr entgehen. Er sollte sogar in Geburtstagspose in die Kamera lächeln. Schon hatte er im Fond der Limousine des ehemaligen Chefs am Institute of Advanced Studies Platz genommen. Links von ihm warteten Frank Aydelotte, rechts dessen Ehefrau Marie. Immer wieder sagte Einstein: „Es ist genug, es ist genug“, aber die Paparazzi gaben keine Ruhe. Sich der Konsequenzen durchaus bewusst, streckte er mit seinem schalkhaften Lachen dem verblüfften Fotografen Arthur Sasse die Zunge heraus. Der drückte auf den Auslöser und so entstand das Foto, das um die Welt gehen würde.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Brief m. U. „Albert”, o. O., 8. April 1926, 2/3 Seite 4°. An seine erste Frau Mileva Einstein-Maric (1875-1948): „[…] Ich sende Dir hier einen Brief von Zangger, in dem von einer Hypothek auf das Haus die Rede ist. Aber genauer werde ich nicht klug daraus, hauptsächlich, weil ich den Brief nicht entziffern kann. Schreib mir dann wieder, was lost ist, damit ich Euch raten kann. Ich bin besorgt wegen Albert, da ich gar nicht mehr höre. Er scheint blind in das Verderben zu laufen, ohne dass wir was thun können. Ich schreibe Zangger, auch wegen Albert. Im Juli komme ich, um mit Tete die Ferien zuzubringen. Erkundigt Euch nach einem Ort in beträchtlicher Höhe, mindestens 1500 m, wo nicht ein geschwollener Fremdenverkehr ist. Ich muss ein paar Tage wieder nach Genf, wohin ich aber Tete mitnehmen könnte. Wann beginnen und endigen Tetes Ferien? Ich möchte möglichst lange mit ihm sein. Ich freue mich sehr darauf […] Übermorgen Abend bin ich mit der Mutter Deiner Freundin bei Moszkowskis zusammen […]“ – 1930 erkrankte Eduard „Tete“ an Schizophrenie. – Einstein macht sich Sorgen um die Beziehung seines Sohnes Hans Albert mit seiner späteren Frau (Hochzeit 1927) Frieda Knecht, die er lange Zeit abgelehnt hatte.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Brief m. U. „A. E.”, o. O. [Zürich], 8. April o. J., 3 ½ Seiten gr.-8°. Doppelblatt. Kleiner Einriss am Mittelfalz. Hotelbriefkopf. An seine erste Frau Mileva Einstein-Maric (1875-1948) kurz nach Ihrer Trennung; vorwiegend über Scheidungsfragen: „[…] meine Hochachtung wegen des guten Zustandes unserer Buben. Sie sind körperlich und seelisch in bester Verfassung, wie ich mirs nicht besser wünschen könnte. Und ich weiss, dass dies grösstenteils Deiner richtigen Erziehung zu verdanken ist. Ebenso bin ich Dir dankbar dafür, dass Du mir die Kinder nicht entfremdet hast. Sie kamen mir frei und nett entgegen. Ich freue mich sehr, einige Tage mit Albert allein verbringen zu können. Eine Besprechung zwischen uns hätte keinen Zweck und könnte nur geeignet sein, alte Wunden wieder aufzureissen. […] Eine Scheidung zwischen uns kann – soviel mir bekannt ist – nur auf Grund einer von Dir ausgehenden Klage erfolgen. Denn da ich als der schuldige Teil figurieren muss, und ich mich selber nicht verklagen kann, scheint die erste Frage: Bist Du prinzipiell geneigt, eine Scheidungsklage gegen mich einzureichen? Wenn nein, so entfallen die folgenden Fragen. Es scheint mir, dass Du dabei nichts riskierst. Denn Du kannst ja selbst die Bedingungen angeben, unten denen Du mit einer Scheidung einverstanden wärest. Wenn Du prinzipiell geneigt bist, eine Klage einzureichen, nach dem wir uns über die Bedingungen verständigt haben, entsteht die Frage, ob die Verhandlungen hier oder in Berlin stattzufinden haben. Soviel ich weiss, ist es unsicher, ob dies hier sein kann. In Berlin ist es sicher möglich, und weniger langwierig. […] Alles wird offen und ehrlich gemacht werden. Ich erwarte also Antwort auf folgende Fragen. 1) Bist du bereit, falls wir uns über die Bedingungen einigen, die Klage einzureichen? 2) Welchen sind im Ja-Falle etwa Deine Bedingungen 3) Bist Du im Falle des Einverständnisses bezüglich 1) und 2) bereit, mit der Ausführung der Formalitäten den schon avisierten Berliner Anwalt zu betrauen.


Einstein, Albert

E. Postkarte mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Postkarte m. U. „Euer Papa”, Berlin, o. D., 1 Seite 8°. An seinen ersten Sohn Hans Albert „Mein lieber Albert“: „[…] Es ist so schwer, über die Grenze zu kommen, dass mehrere hiesige Bekannte wieder zurück mussten, ohne in die Schweiz reisen zu können. Deshalb kann ich jetzt nicht zu Dir kommen. Ostern aber besuche ich Dich wieder, ich werde dann solange an der Grenze warten bis ich hinüber darf […]“


Einstein, Albert

E. Postkarte mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Postkarte m. U. „Papa”, Berlin, 15. November 1915, 1 Seite 8°. An seinen ersten Sohn Hans Albert „Mein lieber Albert“: „[…] Ich will um Neujahr in die Schweiz kommen, um mit Dir ein paar Tage zuzubringen. Prof. Zangger hat Dir gewiss schon den Vorschlag gemacht. Wohin möchtest Du am liebsten mit mir? Natürlich nicht weit von Zürich weg. Prof. Zangger meinte, mir sollten zu Herrn Besso. Ich weiss aber nicht, ob Du das gern hast […]“


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Brief m. U. „Albert”, o. O. u. D., 2 Seiten gr.-8°. An seine erste Frau Mileva Einstein-Maric (1875-1948) nach Ihrer Trennung: „[…] ich […] bin auch sachlich mit dem Inhalte sehr einverstanden. Tete schreibt wirklich geistvoll, aber es ist gefährlich für ihn, wenn man ihm ‚den Hof macht’. Erstens nämlich ist es verderblich für ihn, wenn sein Ehrgeiz angestachelt wird. Er könnte die Beschaulichkeit verlieren, ohne die eine tiefere Entwicklung unmöglich ist. Sodann wird er leicht selbstzufrieden, verliert die Kritik gegen sich selbst und wird später verbittert, wenn er in der grossen Aussenwelt nicht die Resonanz findet. Mann mus ihm einprägen, dass er auf einen normalen Beruf hinarbeiten muss, der ihm eine gewisse Sicherheit der sozialen Position gibt, die ihm [sein] inneres Gleichgewicht sichert. Die schöpferische Beschäftigung mit literarischen Dingen ist als Hauptberuf ein Unding wie etwa ein Tier, das nur Lilien frisst. Du kannst ihm sehr viel Gutes erweisen, wenn Du ihm dies oft und eindringlich sagst. Es wäre doch gut, wenn Du mir ihn schicktest […] Albert thut mir leid. Er schrieb mir neulich einen unverschämten Brief unter dem Einfluss der weiblichen Macht. Er kann sich nur so innerlich retten, dass er mich von sich selbst in jeder Weise herabsetzt; das thut er auch. Durch seine Sache muss er durch, zu retten ist da nichts mehr. Es thut mir leid, dass Du auch sonst so viel Sorgen hast: die alte Mutter mit der hoffnungslos kranken Tochter. […] Ich hatte auch das ewige Nasenbluten wie Tete. Ich fürchte, es hängt mit der Jugend-Tuberkulose zusammen […]“


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Brief m. U. „von Deinem gestrengen Vater”, Berlin, 27. März o. J., 2/3 Seite 4°. Auf gedrucktem Briefpapier. Kleinere Randläsuren. An seinen zweiten Sohn Eduard „Tete“: „[…] Dein Brief erscheint mir nicht nur verständig, wondern ich ertappe mich darauf, schon oft Ae[h]nliches gefühlsmässig im Busen genährt zu haben. Aber bisher war doch der Schwerpunkt Deiner Auffassung die Lehre von der Negierung der gegenseitigen Hilfe und Förderung der Menschen. Wenn Du Dich gegen die Überschätzung des Geistigen wendest, so gebe ich Dir völlig recht. Ach hier haben die Griechen vorbildlich das richtige Mass gefunden. Ich habe an Deiner Schreiberei viel Vergnügen. Wir wollen uns darüber unterhalten, auch über das Frauenstimmrecht. Dafür kämpfen unter den Weibern eigentlich nur solche mit männlichem Einschlag […]“


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Brief m. U. „Euer Papa”, o. O. [Berlin], 23. März 1929, 1 Seite 8°. Auf der Rückseite seine faksimilierte Danksagungskarte zum 50. Geburtstag. An seine Kinder Hans Albert und Eduard: „[…] Hier mein Geburtstag-Gedicht. Wir erwarten Euch also in dieser Woche. Schreibt, sobald als möglich, den Tag Eurer Ankunft. Tetel kommt auch zu meiner grossen Freude. Ein Häuschen haben wir aber nicht bekommen, sondern den Platz für ein solches […]“


Einstein, Albert

E. Postkarte mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Postkarte m. U. „Euer Papa”, Zürich, 14. März 1930, 1 Seite 8°. An seinen Sohn Hans Albert: „[…] Wir haben hier 6 schöne Tage zusammen verbracht, die ich bei Gelegenheit des Zionistenkongresses hier zubrachte. Tetel […] geht im Herbst zu meiner Schwester nach Florenz. Grossmann traf ich in desolatem Zustand. Heut Abend geht’s wieder nach Berlin oder vielmehr nach Kaputh bei Potsdam, wo ich Euch das nächste Mal in eigenem Häuschen zu empfangen hoffe. Es ist in etwa einem Monat fertig. Da wartet auch ein stolzes Segelschiff, das mir geschenkt wurde. Mein Problem macht schöne Fortschritte […]“ – Auf der gleichen Karte mit Grüßen von Ilsa Einstein.


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Brief m. U. „Dein Papa”, o. O., 13. November 1930, 2/3 Seite 4°. Faltspuren. An seinen Sohn Hans Albert: „[…] Anbei die Abschrift eines Briefes Deines ehemaligen Lehrers. Mama riet, an ihn zu schreiben, was ich that; berichte ihr sofort, da sie natürlich sehr interessiert ist […] Ich glaube, das es eine gute Sache wäre, aber die Entscheidung liegt bei Dir. Ich würde an Deiner Stelle lieber mündlich die Hauptverhandlung mit ihm führen, da das Geschriebene starr ist und leicht zum Bruch führt. Es handelt sich um eine Stellung als Ingenieur am eidgen[össischen]. wasserbautechnischen Institut in Zürich […]“ – Beiliegt: e. Briefentwurf (Bewerbungsschreiben) von Hans Albert Einstein an den Professor, 2 Seiten quer—gr.-8°. Eng beschrieben.


Einstein, Albert

E. Postkarte mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Postkarte m. U. „Albert bezw. Papa”, Leiden, 29. November 1931 1 ¼ Seiten 8°. An seine erste Frau Mileva Einstein-Maric (1875-1948) nach Ihrer Trennung: „[…] Ich habe den Brief sogleich besorgt. Man kann der Firma den schlechten Einkauf nicht ankreiden, da die Weltkrise in ihren Folgen nicht vorauszubestimmen war. Ich glaube, dass die Werte sich wieder erholen werden. Den Radioapparat will ich Euch gern geben. Ich habe keinen und die Schickerei ist heutzutage nicht vorteilhaft. Kauft Euch einen Apparat mit Netz-Anschluss (ohne Akumulator) und schicket die Rechnung an Prof. Ehrenfest, Witte Rogen Str. Leiden. Dieser schickt dann das Geld direkt der Firma. Albert soll Euch beim Auswählen helfen, weil er es gut versteht. Dies ist gewissermassen ein Ersatz für die unterbliebene Reise mit Tetel […]“


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Brief m. U. „Dein Albert”, o. O., 17. November 1931, 2/3 Seite 4°. An seine erste Frau Mileva Einstein-Maric (1875-1948) nach Ihrer Trennung: „[…] Nun kann ich leider doch nicht zu Euch kommen, da ich nach Amerika abreisen muss nächste Woche, und zwar wieder nach Pasadena (Instit. Of Technologie). Ich bleibe dort Januar und Februar. Ich würde gerne Tetel mitnehmen; ich glaube aber sicher, dass es für ihn besser ist, wenn er in seiner regelmässigen Thätigkeit ist. Hoffentlich lebe ich noch, wenn er mit dem Studium fertig ist; dann könnte es besser nachgeholt werden. Tetel entwickelt sich sehr gut. Ich hoffe, dass sich bei ihm bald der Ehrgeiz in Freude am Schaffen umsetzt. Dann wird er wirklich ein ganzer Kerl […]“


Einstein, Albert

E. Brief mit U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Brief m. U. „Dein Papa”, Caputh, 6. Oktober 1932, 1 Seite gr.-4°. Eng beschrieben. An seinen Sohn Hans Albert: „[…] Du musst es begreifen, dass mein Vertrauen sich allmählich erschöpft hat und dass ich keine Lust habe, nach Zürich zu fahren, worum sie mich gebeten hat. An Tetel kann ich nicht wegen seines Zustandes auch nicht mehr wenden. Thue nun Du nach Rücksprache mit Deiner Mutter und wenn möglich mit Tetel, was Du für richtig hältst. Ich warte ab und werde mein künftiges Verhalten danach ausrichten. Tetels Zustand halte ich für ernst. Du weißt ja selbst, welche Gefahren Deiner Mutter Descendenz mit sich bringt. Ich habe Dir alles ohne Erfolg wiederholt dargelegt, als es für die Verhütung künftigen Unheils noch Zeit war. Nun heisst es Tragen, was nicht mehr zu ändern ist. Es thut mir leid, dass ich Dich mit alledem belasten muss; aber es geht nicht anders, weil Klarheit unbedingt für mit nötig ist, damit ich mich richtig verhalten kann. […]“


Einstein, Albert

E. Postkarte
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Albert Einstein (1879-1955), Physiker, Nobelpreisträger; Schöpfer der Relativitätstheorie. E. Postkarte, Berlin, 26. Oktober 1925, 1 ½ Seiten 8°. An seinen Sohn Eduard „Lieber Tete“: „[…] Neulich sandte ich dem alten Banquier Fürstenberg, der viele glänzende Witze gemacht hat ein Glückwunschschreiben zu seinem 75. Geburtstag. Ich sende Dir eine Abschrift damit Du siehst, dass Dein alter Herr auch was für die holde Muse übrig hat. Glück wünsch’ ich dem Finanz-Magnaten | Dess Leben voller Ruhmesthaten | S’gab viel gewalt’ge Geldesleute | Ob stark am Ende oder pleite | So sehr ihr mächt’ger Name glänzt’ | Die Pracht war zeitlich sehr begrenzt. | Doch Fürstenberg im Gegenteil | Ward die Unsterblichkeit zuteil, | Erreicht’ sie nicht durch vieles Sitzen | Und über tief Problemen schwitzen | Viel lose Witze liess er fliegen | Dass man vor Lachen sich muss biegen | Herrn Fürstenberg thu ich verschreiben | So lang als sie mobil zu bleiben. […] Dies Schreiben kommt wohl etwas spät | Die Kuh nur Milch gibt, wenn sie hat. […]“