Arthur Conan Doyle

Doyle, Arthur Conan

britischer Schriftsteller (1859-1930). Eigenh. Brief mit Unterschrift. Crowborough, Sussex. Gr.-8vo. 1 1/2 pp. Gedr. Briefkopf.
$ 3,812 / 3.500 € (94937)

An einen Allerton Cushman vermutlich wegen einer Gerichtssache: „Your visit was a great pleasure to me. I shall get to work on Hope presently but I want to know more about that 5th plate. It is the one & only snag. The theory of the prosecution is that the marked plate was kept after abstraction, that Hope used them not knowing it was marked and that it is now a damning witness aginst him. So I read it. I don’t see much forcd in the objection „If a fifth where is the sixth?“ They answer „What matter? He grabbed the nearest, used it, and here it is „It is perfectly deadly if they can produce a marked plate with the figure of a sitter on it who sat after Feb 24th. Our line of inquiry is to follow up every plate sent out by Hope - he is not in the habit of sending out plates.

Then, if we can account for all their one is a fraud. It should not be difficult to trace them all. That is the only safe line. Could you give me a paragraph about your experiment with Hope and Carrington? That would be useful as a quotation. Also a paragraph about the Deans experiments with Lodge. I should make a shattering reply if I could get my material.’.

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Doyle, Arthur Conan

British writer and physician (1859-1930). Autograph envelope (fragment). No place or date. 79 x 45 mm.
$ 272 / 250 € (83049/BN54466)

To the American educator and supporter of women's suffrage, Mrs. (Helen Rolfe Hopkins) Thom, Hillside, Roland Park, Baltimore (MD). Neatly trimmed.

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Doyle, Arthur Conan

British writer and physician (1859-1930). Autograph postcard signed. Crowborough. Oblong 8vo. ½ page (5 lines). With autograph address.
$ 1,634 / 1.500 € (90405/BN60100)

To the Bristol brewer and businessman Frederick William Bennett (d. 27 Sept. 1941): "Dear Sir / It does seem most disgraceful / Yours sincerely / A Conan Doyle [...]". - Doyle in his later life turned to spiritualism and in 1918 published his first spiritualist book "The New Revelation". - Slightly browned due to paper.

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Doyle, Arthur Conan

British writer and physician (1859-1930). "The Bully of Brocas Court". Autograph manuscript signed twice ("A. Conan Doyle"). Windlesham, Crowborough. 4to (161 x 202 mm). 27 pp. Ink on lined paper, numbered in pencil in another hand. Fastened with brass tack at upper left corner. Stored in a quarter morocco clamshell case. (With:) The Strand Magazine. London, George Newnes, November 1921 issue (No. 371,.
$ 81,675 / 75.000 € (91346/BN60378)

The complete autograph manuscript of a work widely considered one of Doyle's best ghost stories. The macabre tale unites two of the author's great passions, boxing and Spiritualism, to create the tale of a sinister prize fighter whose physical brutality does not die. The present manuscript contains mostly minor edits, though a handful of pages include more substantial excisions and additions: on page nine, for example, "the man who accosted them" has been replaced with simply "him", and the description of "a surly red face" has been expanded to include "with an ill-fitting lower lip".

On page 13, nearly twenty words have been crossed out. Includes a fine, bright copy of the "Strand Magazine" issue in which the story was first published. - Some spotting and soiling, most visible on first and final pages. Centre crease throughout. Ink a little faded in some places; final page with a little creasing and a couple short closed tears. Provenance: Sotheby’s New York, 10 Dec. 1993, lot 320. Latterly in the collection of the U.S. lawyer Edward R. Leahy (b. 1947)..

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Doyle, Arthur Conan

Autograph letter signed.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar


Doyle, Arthur Conan

Autograph manuscript (unsigned).
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Rare manuscript, written entirely in Doyle's hand. At the head of the first sheet, it is entitled "General Outlines of first lecture". Doyle begins by discussing the fundamental import of the questions addressed by spiritualism in the western world: "This subject which we have met to consider is far the most important in the world. It is one which ultimately concerns the fate of every one of us. There is a certain natural impatience that so huge and engrossing a question should be raised at a time when so many mundane problems seek a solution, but there are two very good reasons for this / 1. Unless we get the spiritual lessons while still under the influence of war shock we may relapse into pre[-] war materialism. 2. These religious questions are at the base of all things, and no permanent reconstruction is possible until you get a permanent base. Therefore mundane problems really depend upon the spiritual ones. Let me say at once that I speak with all humility. It is true that I have studied the matter for 34 years, that I have had a wide personal experience of investigation and that I have some knowledge both of science and possibly of detection. But granted all that, I know how complex the matter is. I speak of my own experiences and my own conclusions and I give you my reasons for the faith - or I would rather say the knowledge - to which I have attained…I appeal to you would I not be a stock and a stone if I were not convinced of spirit return - if I not know it - and if I did not devote all that is in me to getting other people to know it. Look at what it means. See how the shadow of death thins away until it is no longer a dark cloud but rather a sun-tinted haze. It is a grand support for a man who is in danger [...]". Doyle cites several examples, including: "There is immensely interesting dialogue, which is reported a verbatim by a stenographer, between Dr. Hodgson after his death, and his friend & collaborator Hyslop, who has now joined him, but was then alive. Mrs. Piper was the medium. Hodgson was using her mechanism, and was speaking direct to Hyslop, giving reference after reference to things between them which were unknown to Mrs. Piper [...] talking of his death he said 'It is delightful to go through the cool ethereal atmosphere [...] [of] this life and shake off the mortal body [...] It is all so much better than I anticipated'. He recommended prayer as an expansion of the soul [...]". - With deletions and corrections in Doyle's hand. Doyle publicly announced his belief in spiritualism, which was strengthened by his son's wartime death in 1917. He expended a great deal of time and money to advance spiritualism - often lecturing as part of his efforts in this regard. This lecture manuscript offers fascinating and profound insight into Doyle's thoughts on the matter to which he was so devoted. - Age-toning, fold wear, and file hole at upper left of each page, otherwise very good. Accompanied by letter from James Lowe certifying authenticity of the manuscript.


Doyle, Arthur Conan

Autograph letter signed.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar