Paul Éluard

French poet, 1895-1952

"Paul Éluard, who grew up in a Parisian middle-class home, contracted tuberculosis in his adolescence and had to undergo several treatments. During treatment in Davos he met his first wife and muse Gala. While at the Sanatorium Éluard published his first poems in 1913. Jean Paulhan introduced Éluard to André Breton and his circle in 1919. After Breton published the ""Surrealist Manifesto"" in 1924, Éluard adapted his poetry to the principles of surrealism. In 1937 Paul Éluard described surrealism as a state of mind and as an insurrection against the bourgeoisie. Poets and writers, to him, are society's conscience."

Source: Wikipedia

Éluard, Paul

Dichter (1895-1952). "Le mirage". Autograph poem. O. O. u. D. 1 S. Gr.-4to.
$ 2,694 / 2.500 € (49330/BN33665)

"Est-ce dit | Le regard de torture | Le regard plus inquiet qu'un rat chez les bêtes | Inquier d'une femme cachée | Refusée | Qui ressemble à ce que je n'écris pas." - Éluard's poem was first published in "La vie immèdiate" in 1932. - Formerly framed and strongly browned.

buy now

Éluard, Paul

French poet (1895-1952). "Le temps d'un éclair". Autograph poem signed. N. p. Folio (ca. 267 x 407 mm). 1 p. (17 lines). Framed and glazed (457 x 599 mm).
$ 9,160 / 8.500 € (88864/BN58807)

Spectacular manuscript written on paper with a gilt-stamped border and illustrated with a photograph pasted and captioned by Paul Éluard. The poem "Le temps d'un éclair" was published in Éluard's anthology "La Vie immédiate" (1932): "Elle n'est pas là. / La femme au tablier guette la pluie aux vitres / En spectacle tous les nuages jouent au plus fin / Une fillette de peu de poids / Passée au bleu / Joue sur un canapé crevé / Le silence a des remords [...]". - The small photograph (60 x 42 mm), pasted to the left of the first verse, shows the head and torso of a nude young woman.

Éluard quotes his poem in the caption: "Une fillette de peu de poids / Passée au bleu" ("A young girl of little weight / Vanished into the blue"). The slight fading of the photograph even underscores its appropriateness as a congenial illustration of Éluard's poem: the allegory of a young girl's disappearance. - Traces of folds. With minor stains due to abrasions. Formerly in the collection of André Breton..

buy now