Winston S. Churchill

Churchill, Winston S.

Staatsmann (1874–1965). Eigenh. U. am Titelblatt des "Life-Magazins" vom 29. IV. 1940. O. O. 315:265 mm. Randmängel.
1.500 € (25306)

Sehr selten.

jetzt kaufen

Churchill, Winston S.

Staatsmann (1874-1965). Ms. Brief mit eigenh. U. Whitehall. 1½ SS. auf Doppelblatt. 4to.
6.500 € (33289/BN28304)

Gestrenges Schreiben des damaligen Rüstungsministers an seinen widerspenstigen Kollegen, Joseph Paton Maclay, 1st Baron Maclay (1857-1951), damals Schifffahrtsminister, über die Beschaffung von Rohstoffen aus Spanien und Narvik (Norwegen): "Your letter of the 22nd inst. does nothing to relieve my anxiety. Whether importations of Ore from Northern Spain or from Narvick are considered, it is perfectly clear that shipments are now proceeding at a rate which must lead to a complete breakdown in the Iron and Steel production and so affect every industry concerned in the prosecution of the war.

The Nitrate position is even more serious than the iron and steel, because in this case the whole supply is seaborne, and the entire process of ammunition filling will come to an abrupt arrest. It is, further, very difficult for me to proceed without any idea of what the future has in store. I failed entirely to obtain any answer on this point from your Department. I have to make an enormous series of arrangements for the supply of the Army which depend absolutely upon Raw Material, and we cannot be told even generally within what limits we may expect to be supplied. I have been pressing for information on this vital point for more than three months without receiving anything in return except your invariable courtesy. I really do not know what to do [...] As it is we weem to be moving forward to a complete administrative breakdown [...]". - Auf Briefpapier mit gepr. Briefkopf des Rüstungsministeriums; am linken oberen Rand etwas eingerissen..

jetzt kaufen

Churchill, Winston S.

Staatsmann (1874-1965). Vertrag mit eigenh. U. O. O. 2 SS. auf 2 Bll. Folio.
5.500 € (33290/BN28306)

Interessantes Dokument zu der von Churchill letztlich nicht verfaßten "Geschichte Europas seit der Russischen Revolution" ("Europe Since the Russian Revolution"), eines der wenigen literarischen Vorhaben, die Churchill aufgegeben hatte. Wie aus dem Vertrag mit dem Verleger George Harrap hervorgeht, hätte Churchill für das Werk insgesamt eine Summe von £13,500 erhalten sollen, davon £1,500 bei Vertragsunterzeichnung, £2,000 bei Abgabe von Teil I, weitere £3,000 bei Abgabe von Teil II und £7,000 nach Abschluß des dritten Teils.

Absatz 10 regelt, daß im Falle von Streitigkeiten oder Meinungsverschiedenheiten diese vor dem Schiedsgericht auszutragen wären - wo die Kontrahenten schließlich um 1943 auch landen sollten: Churchill, der durch den Ausbruch des Weltkrieges anderes zu tun gehabt hatte, als sich historischer Forschung zu widmen - "I suppose I have not read a dozen books in the last five years" -, argumentierte auch ganz in diesem Sinne, daß er jegliches Interesse an Europa nach der Russischen Revolution verloren hätte und daß überdies durch eine Geschichte Rußlands aus seiner Feder eine Gefährdung der kriegsbedingt notwendig gewordenen Allianz mit Stalin nicht von der Hand zu weisen sei. Auch neuerliche Anläufe Harraps zu noch großzügigeren Konditionen führten zu keinem Ergebnis, so daß Harrap schließlich im September 1944 sich eingestehen mußte, daß es, gleich ob sein Verlag nun im Recht sei oder nicht, unangenehm sei, einen Prozeß mit einem Mann zu führen, dem jeder von ihnen so viel schulde ("it is distasteful to us, whether we are right or not, to litigate this matter with a man to whom every one of us is so much indebted", zit. in: Reynolds, In Command of History, SS. 19-20). Die erste Rate seines Honorars zahlte Churchill freilich zurück; mit Harrap sollte er keinerlei Geschätsbeziehung mehr eingehen, seine Kriegserinnerungen "The Second World War" erschienen bei Macmillan und Cassells. - Bl. 1 von Churchill eh. paraphiert, Bl. 2 mit den Unterschriften von Churchill und seinem Verleger sowie von dessen Sekretärin; etwas angestaubt und eingerissen..

jetzt kaufen

Churchill, Winston S.

British statesman (1874-1965). Typed letter signed. 10 Downing Street. 4to. 1½ pp. on 2 ff.
7.500 € (34046/BN29760)

To Mrs Cowper, written on his re-accession to power in 1951: "I have been preoccupied with national problems since becoming Prime Minister so that it is only just recently that I have been able to consider my personal affairs, and how they affect all the people who have been working for me over the past years [...] I know how efficiently and happily you have looked after my affairs and interests in my constituency over the past years, and I wish you to know how much Mrs Churchill and I have valued your services and your loyalty [...]. - On engraved headed paper bearing the seal of the Prime Minister and blind-stamp of George VI, filing-hole at head.

jetzt kaufen

verkauft

 
Churchill, Winston S.

Ms. Brief m. e. U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Winston Churchill (1874–1965), Staatsmann. Ms. Brief mit e. Anrede u. U., London, 21. Dezember 1940, 1 Seite 4°. An eine Amerikanerin “Mrs. Sears”: “Thank you very much for your kind letter. It is encouraging to feel that we have the ever-increasing sympathy and support of the people of the United States, and especially of New England, in this great struggle.” – Am selben Tage bombardierten Deutsche Flugzeuge Victoria Station.


Churchill, Winston S.

Typed letter signed ("Winston").
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

To his aunt Leonie Leslie on his first flat and a trip to Paris. Churchill rejoices in being established in his first bachelor quarters, a set of "beautiful rooms" in Mount Street which have been passed on to him by his cousin Sunny (9th Duke of Marlborough); he is now much more comfortable than when living with his mother at Cumberland Place, "but of course I no longer live for nothing". He asks his aunt to help him improve the rooms on her return from Ireland, being himself indifferent to this sort of "material arrangement [...] so long as my table is clear and there is plenty of paper, I do not worry about the rest". He has just returned from Paris with Sunny and his other cousin, Ivor [Guest], and reports unfavourably on the Exposition Universelle, criticising the lack of "cleverness" in the arrangements, comparing large parts of the exhibition to "parts of Whiteley's shop", and in particular finding fault with the inefficiency of the characteristically French trio of ticket seller, ticket puncher and ticket collector at the door of each stall. - Until moving into Mount Street, Churchill had continued to use his mother's house at 35a Cumberland Place as his London home; he was to remain in Mount Street until 1905. The 1900 Paris Exposition Universelle inaugurated a number of Paris's most celebrated buildings, including the Grand and Petit Palais, the Pont Alexandre III and the Gare (now Musée) d'Orsay, as well as the first line of the Paris Metro. - On headed paper; previously laid down (fol. 1 missing lower right corner)


Churchill, Winston S.

Letter signed.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

To A. W. MacKenzie, acknowledging a letter which evidently faulted him for neglecting the private side of Lord Randolph Churchill in the masterful political biography he had published the previous year; Churchill accepts that the work was "somewhat too severely circumscribed in its social and private side from the fact that it was written by a son", citing a natural hesitancy in treating private matters which are of course of considerable interest to the family but which "may appear trivial to the general public". - Fol. 1 recto marked by Churchill as "private"; on stationery with embossed letterhead "Colonial Office, Downing Street, S. W.".


Churchill, Winston S.

Autograph memorandum and typed memorandum, both signed with initials.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

The first, asking who is responsible for an order that officers are to attend regimental dinners in service uniform; the second, pointing out that the order is not always being obeyed, noting that as a regimental dinner is a "private affair", it is "undesirable to make the change to uniform", but that if it is to be done, "there ought to be compliance". - Punch holes, minor soiling, edges slightly frayed; slight ruststains from old paper clip.


Churchill, Winston S.

Brief m. e. Anrede u. U.
Autograph ist nicht mehr verfügbar

Winston Churchill (1874–1965), Staatsmann. Ms. Brief mit e. Anrede, Grußzeile und U., Chartwell (Kent), 28. Februar 1939, 1 Seite 8°. – An den britischen Filmproduzenten Reginald Fogwell von der British Empire Film Productions: „I thank you for your letter of February 25, but regret that I am much too occupied at the present time to entertain the proposition you have kindly made to me [...]“. – Auf Briefpapier mit gepr. Briefkopf.